Change names for the books of the Bible

I have a Bible that doesn’t have the same names for all the books, or thay are spelled different, than the newer Bibles.

About 27 Old Testament and one New Testament books.

Can anyone tell me when and why these names change?:hmmm:

[quote=rickwrn]I have a Bible that doesn’t have the same names for all the books, or thay are spelled different, than the newer Bibles.

About 27 Old Testament and one New Testament books.

Can anyone tell me when and why these names change?:hmmm:
[/quote]

The bible is a document penned, over time, by several dozen different authors. It is no surprise to me that the names of books have changed, much as it is no surprise that inconsistencies, oddities, and outright fallacies have been introduced as well.

[quote=Cosmo]The bible is a document penned, over time, by several dozen different authors. It is no surprise to me that the names of books have changed, much as it is no surprise that inconsistencies, oddities, and outright fallacies have been introduced as well.
[/quote]

Not a Catholic huh??

There is only one author of the Bible.

You used the word… so give this forum a fallacy you have found or been told about in the word of God !

Mr S

[quote=rickwrn]I have a Bible that doesn’t have the same names for all the books, or thay are spelled different, than the newer Bibles.

About 27 Old Testament and one New Testament books.

Can anyone tell me when and why these names change?:hmmm:
[/quote]

Most modern bibles use Anglisized names for the books. Many older bibles would have used the Latin names.

Matthew, Mark, Luke and John were NOT the names of the sacred authors. They were…Mattai, Marqus, Luqa and Yukhanan and of course they used the west Aramaic alphabet to spell them with. Then the names went into Greek then Latin and now English. Same with all the books.

[quote=MrS]Not a Catholic huh??

There is only one author of the Bible.
[/quote]

Well, wait a second here. There is ample historical evidence that shows the bible as having been penned by a number of humans (I believe the number is close to 40) over a period of perhaps two or three hundred years. I am acquainted with a number of catholic persons who maintain this view as well.

How, then, can there only be one author of the Bible? Your assertion seems to be in direct disagreement with historical fact.

Oh man, you hit my pet peeve! My first bible was an RSV with all the names in it spelled with phonetics, only I had no clue at that age how to read them. So a simple word like Levite, which I could have pronounced just fine became Le’ vite with bars over the e and the i. I had no clue what that was.

You just have to go back to the 1950’s to find interesting spellings for the prophets’ names. Guess who Abdias is? That would be Obadiah. Obadiah is closer to the hebrew, so maybe Adbias is closer to latin.

At least some of it relates to that the latin translation of the bible used one set of names and the hebrew copy uses another set for the same books.

I hate to bust anyone’s bubble, but the fact of the matter is that there are TWO authors of the Bible. Now this may seem semantic, but it is important to understand: there is a Primary and a Secondary author. Guess who’s Primary. Ding Ding Ding, Yes that’s right GOD THE ALMIGHTY is the primary author. He used (mysteriously), the secondary authors, us, to write down the teachings of God in our own language in our own way with our own culture. God’s WORD doesn’t change, but the way we express it may, for example - We may say Tobias instead of Tobit but they are one in the smae person and have the same meaning, jsut spelled differently. In OLD OLD bibles, Genesis was called the First Book of Moses. does that change revelation, NO. Did the books even have titles in their original form, NO!

The point is, God choose us for His revelation vbecause He created us for it. He uses us for His love. That is why many theologians say we don’t create a new human being, we cocreate a new human being - we can’t forget that God’s hand is in the entire process!

Are there mistakes in the bible? Yes, if you read the bible wrong and understand it with a biased mindset. Sure there is lots of them, but only for those lacking in faith. It is a lot like a stain glass window. From the outside, it look neat, but dull and not crafted very well(full of mistakes) but once you enter inside a church(Faith baby!!!) you see the stained glass window for what it is in all its beauty and splendor(Complete Truth.)

So I ask all, are you inside the the proverbial Church?

p.s. if anyone wants to know where these “errors” are or “contradictions” just let me know and I’ll show you a few. Muslims are really good about pointing these things out. We should also be good at finding them in the Quran, as a matter of study! Take care and God Bless!

The Challoner Douay-Rheims Bible was the standard Catholic bible in English since the 16th c, revised in 18 c by Bishop Challoner, trans from Latin to French, and then to English, which is why names of biblical names and authors have French spelling (which are pretty much the same in Spanish) such as Noe for Noah, Elias for Elijah, Jonas for Jonah, etc. The Confraternity version, English translation of the 1940s & 50s for Catholics followed this usage for the most part. The Revised Standard Version, based like most English language translations on the King James and its revisions, used British spellings and usages. The whole history of translations into English is very capably detailed in the intro to the New American Bible, and well worth study.

I used to have something called the "Catholic Action Edition of the Bible. No idea what the actual translation was. But, it called 1 and 2 Kings, and 1 and 2 Chronicles as 1, 2, 3, and 4 Paralipominon. I have not seen that name outside of that edition. I have also noticed that Ecclesiasticus is now usually referred to as Sirach.

[quote=Pug]Oh man, you hit my pet peeve! My first bible was an RSV with all the names in it spelled with phonetics, only I had no clue at that age how to read them. So a simple word like Levite, which I could have pronounced just fine became Le’ vite with bars over the e and the i. I had no clue what that was.

You just have to go back to the 1950’s to find interesting spellings for the prophets’ names. Guess who Abdias is? That would be Obadiah. Obadiah is closer to the hebrew, so maybe Adbias is closer to latin.

At least some of it relates to that the latin translation of the bible used one set of names and the hebrew copy uses another set for the same books.
[/quote]

The New Catholic Encyclopedia uses forms which are half-way between the semi-Hebrew and the Greco-Latin forms, so “Obadiah” of the Protestant English and modern English versions started life as “Abdias” in the LXX and Vulgate and DR-Challoner, is the “Abdia” of the NCE, and then becomes “Obadiah” in NAB & RSV-CE.

The differences in numbering of Kings & naming of Chronicles is an eye-opener - and now we have the change in the order of the books of the OT to contend with. DR-Challoner puts them in a roughly historical order; modern versions order them by literary type: history, then wisdom books, then the Prophets.

Quite apart from the numbering of the Psalms…

The ordering of the books in the Bible familiar since the Reformation was not all that old - sometimes James came directly after Acts. (And sometimes the apocryphal “Prayer of Manasseh” is included in 2 Chronicles.) At least for the NT, once the books are sorted by their type, Gospel-history-letters-Apocalypse, the longer tend to precede the shorter. That’s why the letters to the Corinthians precede the letters to the Thessalonians, even though 1 Thessalonians is probably the earliest of the letters to be written ##

Hi You Rick,

You said: "I have a Bible that doesn’t have the same names for all the books, or thay are spelled different, than the newer Bibles.

About 27 Old Testament and one New Testament books.

Can anyone tell me when and why these names change?:hmmm:"

My comment: I use the Douay-Rheims and some of the Old Testament books have different names from the newer versions such as 1st and 2nd Chronicles is Paralipomenon in the Douay which comes from the Greek. Nehemiah is 2 Esdras in the Douay continuing the previous book to it which is Esdras. Tobit is Tobias in the Douay. 1st and 2nd Samuel is 1st and 2nd Kings in the Douay and 1st and 2nd Kings in the modern translations is 3rd and 4th Kings in the Douay. They make sense and they are all there. The Douay was translated from the Latin Vulgate of St. Jerome and I’m sure this was the name of the books there. I would guess that anyway. The Douay gives an explanation of the title of each book at the beginning.

May God bless,

James224

Ok, I can’t help this:

Paralipomenon??? That is such a cool name! I wish we still used it in our Bibles today!!!

:smiley:

Thanks to everyone who has reply.

I never though much of the different names untill someone at work asked me about it.

Thanks to all of you I have a few ideas of what to tell them.

Again I want to say THANK YOU!!:slight_smile:

[quote=rickwrn]I have a Bible that doesn’t have the same names for all the books, or thay are spelled different, than the newer Bibles.

About 27 Old Testament and one New Testament books.

Can anyone tell me when and why these names change?:hmmm:
[/quote]

I’ll need a little more information. What language is it in? How old is this Bible? If it is over 400 years old, it probably used something other than English names for the Books. Can you please be more spicific; give the titles of the books which are different. Thank you.

[quote=Cosmo]Well, wait a second here. There is ample historical evidence that shows the bible as having been penned by a number of humans (I believe the number is close to 40) over a period of perhaps two or three hundred years. I am acquainted with a number of catholic persons who maintain this view as well.

How, then, can there only be one author of the Bible? Your assertion seems to be in direct disagreement with historical fact.
[/quote]

God is the actual author.

[quote=MichelleTherese]Ok, I can’t help this:

Paralipomenon??? That is such a cool name! I wish we still used it in our Bibles today!!!

:smiley:
[/quote]

I believe “Paralipomenon” was the Greek word for “things left out” or “omitted.” Bishop Challoner’s introduction to the Paralipomenon (or Chronicles) states “they are a kind of supplement of such things as were passed over in the books of the Kings.”

[quote=Cosmo]The bible is a document penned, over time, by several dozen different authors. It is no surprise to me that the names of books have changed, much as it is no surprise that inconsistencies, oddities, and outright fallacies have been introduced as well.
[/quote]

Cosmo, I would guess you are a Mormon, right? Mormons believe the bible to be “hopelessly corrupted” and “untrustworthy”.

We Catholics believe in the inerrancy of scripture, and that God miraculously preserved the sacred texts through the centuries by means of His Church.
Paul

[quote=rickwrn]I have a Bible that doesn’t have the same names for all the books, or thay are spelled different, than the newer Bibles.

About 27 Old Testament and one New Testament books.

Can anyone tell me when and why these names change?:hmmm:
[/quote]

Some Catholic editions of the bible (the Douay-Rheims version, for instance) use the Greek names from the Septuagent Old Testament that was in common use among the Jews of Jesus’ time. The Septuagent was a Greek-language translation of the Hebrew bible, to make it accessable to the many Greek-speaking Jews who no longer read or spoke Hebrew. Our Catholic bibles also use all of the OT books included in the Septuagent. The Protestants deleted 7 OT books from their bibles in the 17th century.
Most modern bibles these days use the Latin/English names for the books.
Hope this helps,
Paul

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