Charismatic Movement:Love it or hate it?


#1

I would like to know what you people think about the charismatic movement. Since I’ve converted, I’ve been going to a charismatic catholic church for mass and prayer groups (not the parish I belong to or “registered under” though). I was raised in a pentecostal denomination, but it didn’t really appeal to me at the time. I’ve now been really drawn to that form of worship. What do all of you think of it?


#2

[quote=Corpus Cristi]I would like to know what you people think about the charismatic movement. Since I’ve converted, I’ve been going to a charismatic catholic church for mass and prayer groups (not the parish I belong to or “registered under” though). I was raised in a pentecostal denomination, but it didn’t really appeal to me at the time. I’ve now been really drawn to that form of worship. What do all of you think of it?
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One of the best kept secrets in my oppinion. :thumbsup:


#3

I was baptized on an Assemblies of God church so I am no stranger to the charasmatic ways. I also attend a charasmatic parish and absolutely love it. For me personally I feel I am able to worship in a much deeper fashion. My parish is what I would consider charasmatic light, meaning you wont see or hear anyone standing up a speaking in tongues. You will hear it at our prayer meetings though. We do raise our hands up while singing the praises of God, and by the way, we do sing at my parish. Loudly, and beautifully! Our pastor has a pretty strict rule against lip synching.


#4

I’m very suspicious of it. It’s origins are suspect as are it’s effects, it tends to dissolve doctrine. Also there seems to be an obssession with gifts and outward manifestations to the detriment of the life of virtue. In short, it should be wholly suppressed.


#5

[quote=Jim ov Cov]I’m very suspicious of it. It’s origins are suspect as are it’s effects, it tends to dissolve doctrine. Also there seems to be an obssession with gifts and outward manifestations to the detriment of the life of virtue. In short, it should be wholly suppressed.
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Jim, the Lord said there will be those who come to stifle the spirit. Great example. :eek:


#6

I thoroughly dislike it! (I will not use the word “hate” - I will try to only hate evil.)

I find the particular hymns irritating and, in the main, rather childish, and I dislike the raising of hands, the swaying and clapping. To me, it is all very superficial and not at all reverent.

I went to a Life in the Spirit Seminar twice. The first time, I droped out when they started urging people to pray aloud, and the second time, I didn’t last past the first session. It just is not for me.


#7

[quote=Joan M]I thoroughly dislike it! (I will not use the word “hate” - I will try to only hate evil.)

I find the particular hymns irritating and, in the main, rather childish, and I dislike the raising of hands, the swaying and clapping. To me, it is all very superficial and not at all reverent.

I went to a Life in the Spirit Seminar twice. The first time, I droped out when they started urging people to pray aloud, and the second time, I didn’t last past the first session. It just is not for me.
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Joan, I appreciate your honesty. I would just say that as a supporter of the charasmatic movement, in regards to being reverent, there is a time to be silent and solemn in front of the Lord, and there are also times to be joyous and outward in your expression of love and worship to Him. You are right though, it isn’t for everyone.


#8

I don’t hate it, but it’s not for me. I went to SteubieU, and would go to the early masses that were more traditional. When my parents came to visit, I made sure not to take them to a Charismatic Mass–it’s totally different from everything they had ever experienced, and would have freaked out. A lot of my friends were Charmismatic, and they gained a lot from the environment there. For me, not so much.


#9

One of my pet peaves is stuff that the charismatics do is tolerated yet the Tridentine Mass is surpressed unless the Bishop allows it, and it’s not used where I live.


#10

I’ve been a Charismatic for over 30 years and I love it.


#11

[quote=Voice_Of_Reason]One of my pet peaves is stuff that the charismatics do is tolerated yet the Tridentine Mass is surpressed unless the Bishop allows it, and it’s not used where I live.
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First of all, what we charasmatics do is not “tolerated”, it is allowed. As far as the Tridentine Mass being surpressed, I’m sorry to hear your bishop isn’t allowing it. I’ll pray for you.


#12

Well, I’ve gotten some info on the charismatic movement, and it actually came out of the Catholic Church. A man, who went on a retreat in Ducesne, along with others, experienced the power of the holy spirit when they’re water wouldn’t work. They called someone to fix it, but they couldn’t come. The retreat was about to end, because of the water problem. They went up to the chapel, where the blessed sacrament was exposed, to pray. He suddenly blurted out, "thank you God for fixing the water."He went downstairs to find out that the water had been fixed. After that, he went back upstairs to thank God and when he reached the top, he fell out. He was “slain in the spirit”. He went back down to the last step, and then doubted. He went back up again. Bam. The same thing happened. The same thing happened once more after he talked to a priest about what happened. The priest told him that this was biblical and that this was an act of God. 15 people experienced the Holy Spirit on this retreat, while about 15 didn’t, (there were about 30 to begin with). Something, that isn’t that obvious, is that charismatics are very strong in their faith and on fire for Jesus Christ. I don’t find ANY of those nominal types in the charismatic parish. They just wouldn’t fit in. I’ve observed that it’s usually at the more “traditional” parishes that you get the nominals, the people who you see at midnight mass on Christmas and they say “Bye, see you next Easter”, the kinds of people who just go to mass every Sunday, but they don’t think to go to confession that often, or the people who might even think “well, mass isn’t that horrible, but if I was only obligated to go for the coffee and donuts after, I would”, or they just come to “knock elbows” like it’s a social event-type Catholics. I’m not complaining. :slight_smile:


#13

[quote=Voice_Of_Reason]One of my pet peaves is stuff that the charismatics do is tolerated yet the Tridentine Mass is surpressed unless the Bishop allows it, and it’s not used where I live.
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Tolerated? Our bishop has given us special permission to worship in the way we do. If you want the Tridentine Mass, why don’t you ask for it, that is, if you haven’t already.


#14

[quote=Joan M]I thoroughly dislike it! (I will not use the word “hate” - I will try to only hate evil.)

I find the particular hymns irritating and, in the main, rather childish, and I dislike the raising of hands, the swaying and clapping. To me, it is all very superficial and not at all reverent.

I went to a Life in the Spirit Seminar twice. The first time, I droped out when they started urging people to pray aloud, and the second time, I didn’t last past the first session. It just is not for me.
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Well, I’m sorry you feel that way. To make this clear, so that people won’t be educated about the Charismatic Renewal by a biased opinion, we don’t worship in the way that makes us look like we’re just having a good time, we worship with reverence. You’ll see people with their hands raised and usually, with their eyes closed. The worship, I wouldn’t find childish. These people are worshiping God in spirit and in truth, in an outward expression of their love for God. I just happen to like more traditional liturgies AND charismatic ones. The mass at my parish isn’t all that wild and crazy as you might think. There’s only speaking in tongues after the Gloria, and after communion, and I don’t think everybody even does it. A lot of times, people are praising in English. Do you have to make that much of a contrast in traditional worship and charismatic worship to put one down and put another up? Aren’t they both good in their own ways? Like you said, it’s just not for you. I doesn’t have to be. It’s not like it’s right to be only one, or it’s right to be only the other. It’s just a way for Catholics to experience the holy spirit in their worship of the triune God. Nothing bad or dangerous about that.


#15

[quote=Corpus Cristi]Well, I’m sorry you feel that way. To make this clear, so that people won’t be educated about the Charismatic Renewal by a biased opinion, we don’t worship in the way that makes us look like we’re just having a good time, we worship with reverence. You’ll see people with their hands raised and usually, with their eyes closed. The worship, I wouldn’t find childish. These people are worshiping God in spirit and in truth, in an outward expression of their love for God. I just happen to like more traditional liturgies AND charismatic ones. The mass at my parish isn’t all that wild and crazy as you might think. There’s only speaking in tongues after the Gloria, and after communion, and I don’t think everybody even does it. A lot of times, people are praising in English. Do you have to make that much of a contrast in traditional worship and charismatic worship to put one down and put another up? Aren’t they both good in their own ways? Like you said, it’s just not for you. I doesn’t have to be. It’s not like it’s right to be only one, or it’s right to be only the other. It’s just a way for Catholics to experience the holy spirit in their worship of the triune God. Nothing bad or dangerous about that.
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Whats amazing is when your open to Gods Spirit He will draw you closer to His Heart. Come taste and see the Godness of the Lord. The charismatic movement is open to all not just the select few. I praise God for those who have been drawn in by His Spirit.I know thier lives have been transformed and drawn closer to the Lord. Its all about intimacy. God Bless.


#16

What of the more reserved person? I simply can’t make a spectical of myself. I admire those who can but I’d be sooo uncomfortable.


#17

Love It… It brings many new and fallen away Catholic back to church especially the youth.


#18

[quote=Mijoy2]What of the more reserved person? I simply can’t make a spectical of myself. I admire those who can but I’d be sooo uncomfortable.
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Well, I can relate. I was raised in a pentecostal denomination, and if you think Charismatic Catholics are crazy, you haven’t seen anything yet until you’ve gone to one of the services at my old church. I felt really uncomfortable trying to worship there. When I converted, I went to a more traditional Catholic parish where there wasn’t all that. It felt better because to them, it didn’t “take all that”. When I went to mass at Christ The King, I felt kind of the same way, only, this time, I was sort of drawn to it. It drew me closer to God, a little bit closer than I had been. The people are wonderful, and the worship is great. When you let go and you release yourself to let him take control, it doesn’t really take all that. You’re not doing anything by yourself. It’s basically letting the spirit take control as you worship. :slight_smile:


#19

it’s definitely not for me, OK for some people, but I fear it has a tendency to become protestantized really fast. And I second the comment that it’s crazy that charismatic masses are allowed freely but one has to get the bishop’s permission to celebrate mass in the tridentine rite.


#20

[quote=Corpus Cristi]Well, I’ve gotten some info on the charismatic movement, and it actually came out of the Catholic Church.

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You got the wrong information.

The contemporary Charismatic Movement began in a small protestant sect in Topeka, Kansas. Anybody, any website, any individual, any literature that tells you otherwise has been either misled or is lying to you.

It began with Catholics receiving a Protestant mock-sacrament of ‘baptism of the spirit’, not through the established sacramental channels of grace, but through association with heretical sects. From Pittsburgh it spread to Notre Dame, from Notre Dame it spread to Michigan. Within four years the Catholic Pentecostal movement spread all across the USA and Canada. Ralph Martin was one of the first traveling Pentecostal salesmen who began to spread the new baptism to laymen, priests and religious. Many priests and religious, not willing to wait for Ralph Martin’s arrival went out and found some local Pentecostals to pray over them and so they too began to spread the “Spirit” among Catholics in their area. If you take a close look at the testimonials of other traveling salesmen of the Renewal, you will find that many of them did just that, they got their first anointing from their “Pentecostal brethren”. Is this Catholic? NO!

“In 1966 Pentecostalism entered the Roman Catholic Church as the result of a weekend retreat at DuquesneUniversity led by theology professors Ralph Keiffer and Bill Story. As glossolalia and other charismatic gifts were experienced, other Catholic prayer groups were formed at Notre DameUniversity and the University of Michigan. By 1973 the movement had spread so rapidly that thirty thousand Catholic Pentecostals gathered at Notre Dame for a national conference. The movement had spread to Catholic churches in over a hundred nations by 1980. Other prominent Catholic Pentecostal leaders were Kevin Ranaghan, Steve Clark, and Ralph Martin. The most prominent leader among Catholics, however, was Joseph Leon Cardinal Suenens, who was named by popes Paul VI and John Paul II as episcopal adviser to the renewal.

In order to distinguish these newer Pentecostals from the older Pentecostal denominations, the word “charismatic” began to be used widely around 1973 to designate the movement in the mainline churches. The older Pentecostals were called “classical Pentecostals.” By 1980 the term “neo - Pentecostal” had been universally abandoned in favor of “charismatic renewal.”

Unlike the rejection of the earlier Pentecostals, the charismatic renewal was generally allowed to remain within the mainline churches. Favorable study reports by the Episcopalians (1963), Roman Catholics (1969, 1974), and the Presbyterians (1970), while pointing out possible excesses, generally were tolerant and open to the existence of a Pentecostal spirituality as a renewal movement within the traditional churches.”
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