Charity against falsehood


#1

I am coming across many in the faith who are not faithful in their beliefs to the magesterium.

I have found that even after sincerely informing them of their errors they still refuse to accept church teaching mainly on the moral issues of divorce/contraception/abortion. Even with regard to simple reverence to the Blessed Sacrament, they are indifferent at best.

Is it uncharitable to keep reminding them of their errors or is it better to just pray for them and say no more on the matter?


#2

This is the reason I believe that the unity we seek must come from ‘the image’, or rather the perfect marriage of image and sound. The door to our subconscious mind seems to be guarded by an alien force that interprets all the things we perceive.

I believe that it is ‘the movies’ that has caused this to happen. The sense of the faithful has been destroyed. The remedy had to come through the avenue of movies. And it did… :slight_smile:


#3

We can be charitable to those who are in error, but not towards the error itself, which is why it is important to remind them (firmly but courteously) that what they believe is inconsistent with what, as Catholics, they are supposed to believe.

Gerry :slight_smile:


#4

i didn’t choose an option, because i don’t see them as mutually exclusive. of course we should be nice to everyone all the time. that doesn’t prevent us from pointing out, gently and kindly, when people are wrong about something. and sometimes, i think it means loving them through other means, being consistent in what we live and teach, but being kind and loving to them all the while.

sometimes, i think, it means ‘letting it rest’. beating people over the head with something they can’t accept (at this time) i don’t think does much good. letting them know what you believe, what the church teaches, and then loving them whether they accept it or not, being there for them and doing what you can to let them know you love them, may one day open the door for them to accept the truth.

in any case, we should love one another. if someone understands what you’re saying to them as condemnation and not love, then perhaps a rephrase is in order.


#5

Admonishment is not required if it is unlikely to be of any use. For example, if the person is already going to beat themselves up over something they did wrong, don’t add an admonishment to the mix. You might dishearten them. If a person is just going to ignore your admonishment or be tempted to get angry with you for bugging them, don’t admonish them on that matter again until something changes.

Reverence to the Blessed Sacrament might better be dealt with by always showing it as you pass the tabernacle, etc. You know, by example.


#6

I likewise didn’t choose an option because option 1 and 2 are not inconsistent and can be reconciled, that is, truthfulness can be done with charity.

Gerry :slight_smile:


#7

Could we say “none of the above” or combine some of the answers?

We’re supposed to be nice to people AND tell the truth AND admonish sinners AND avoid conflict if possible.


#8

Tell the TRUTH with lots of love…:love:


#9

[quote=Gunner]I have found that even after sincerely informing them of their errors they still refuse to accept church teaching mainly on the moral issues of …contraception…
[/quote]

Have you discussed this with any priests who dissent?


#10

I have discussed this issue with many priests. Sadly most of them appear afraid to instruct and admonish on the moral issues. They appear to be afraid to upset people in their sins.

I find this in conflict with the Gospel as we are told to “Teach All” not just the nice bits of the Gospel.


#11

[quote=Gunner]I have discussed this issue with many priests. Sadly most of them appear afraid to instruct and admonish on the moral issues. They appear to be afraid to upset people in their sins.

I find this in conflict with the Gospel as we are told to “Teach All” not just the nice bits of the Gospel.
[/quote]

Trying to be nice without trying to be truthful, amounts to consent.

Gerry :slight_smile:


#12

[quote=Gunner]I am coming across many in the faith who are not faithful in their beliefs to the magesterium.

I have found that even after sincerely informing them of their errors they still refuse to accept church teaching mainly on the moral issues of divorce/contraception/abortion. Even with regard to simple reverence to the Blessed Sacrament, they are indifferent at best.

Is it uncharitable to keep reminding them of their errors or is it better to just pray for them and say no more on the matter?
[/quote]

All you can do is get close to them & be their Catholic friend. Our example is a really big part of our witness.


#13

Romans 16:17 I urge you, brothers, to watch out for those who create dissensions and obstacles, in opposition to the teaching that you learned; avoid them.

St. Paul says ***avoid ***opposers of good teaching and he also says purge from your midst those who are actively immoral:

1 Corinthians 5:9-13 I wrote you in my letter not to associate with immoral people, not at all referring to the immoral of this world or the greedy and robbers or idolaters; for you would then have to leave the world. But I now write to you not to associate with anyone named a brother, if he is immoral, greedy, an idolater, a slanderer, a drunkard, or a robber, not even to eat with such a person. For why should I be judging outsiders? Is it not your business to judge those within? God will judge those outside. "Purge the evil person from your midst."


#14

[quote=Pace]This is the reason I believe that the unity we seek must come from ‘the image’, or rather the perfect marriage of image and sound. The door to our subconscious mind seems to be guarded by an alien force that interprets all the things we perceive.

I believe that it is ‘the movies’ that has caused this to happen. The sense of the faithful has been destroyed. The remedy had to come through the avenue of movies. And it did… :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Well yeah living here my whole life I can see your point - to most people here your not gonna stand out unless you look like Colin Farell and drive an X5 rolling on 22’s with four T.V. screens

How about the perfect unity of image and substance?

The movies are an extension of an already existing problem, people are attracted to form over substance.


#15

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