China wants US citizen extradited for pro-democracy ties as Germany suspends its treaty to protect a refugee | Items thought to be made from hair of Muslims in China labor camps seized | OP: The end of Hong Kong's semi-autonomous status

“When you intend to pass laws that seriously affect the lives of seven million people, you make sure you have open consultation. You listen to opinions and you are ready to modify the content of it,” Hong Kong barrister Margaret Ng told DW. “This whole process is secretive because Beijing doesn’t want to hear any objection and Chinese authorities don’t want to give anyone a chance to criticize the law.”

Local media reports have suggested that the Chinese government is looking to finalize and implement the security law before July 1, which many suspect could allow Beijing to interfere with Hong Kong’s upcoming legislative council election in September.

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Simply put:

DO NOT TRAVEL TO CHINA OR ANY COUNTRY WITH AN EXTRADITION TREATY WITH CHINA OR TRANSIT IN THOSE COUNTRIES FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY. HIGH-PROFILE OR AVERAGE JOE YOU MAY WIND UP BEING A HOSTAGE.

Anyone literally can be punished by China for wrongthink and wrongspeak.

Chilling:




am I reading this right???

Article 38: The law applies to persons who do NOT have permanent resident status in HK and commit crimes under this law OUTSIDE Hong Kong.

Did Beijing just grant itself sweeping extraterritoriality to…everyone on the planet?

  1. China has at times used Interpol red notices to go after people it deems “terrorists.” Beijing has also used extradition requests to go after targets.

We could potentially see these uses of this provision.

But all very, very hard to say at this point.

And 4) Although this is likely targeted at people of Chinese heritage—a theme we have long seen in China’s extraterritoriality—the case of the Canadian political hostages Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor indicate Beijing’s growing willingness to apply to non-Chinese.

But if my analysis of this provision is correct, this is truly stunning. Even mainland China’s de factor application of their laws to Chinese nationals and ethnic Chinese abroad isn’t LITERALLY CODIFIED INTO WRITTEN LAW. Not like this.

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are we really any different?

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Very different. But the silent majority is terrible at organizing and unwilling to stand up. The people at the top are too easily intimidated because they like their careers (can’t blame them but there are wider consequences). JK Rowling showed you can stand up and they’ll go away. Stand your ground. Stand firm.

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wrongthink and wrongspeak are still punished by the liberal left.

one rich person isn’t enough to say it isn’t happening here

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It’s getting pretty bad here too though.

Sometimes I think people overstate the freedoms people actually have in the US (and to a certain extent, understate those people have in China).

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Simple answer: DON’T GO THERE!

China is an entire 10 levels above other countries.

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But by the state?
There are still free elections. People don’t get arrested for booing national anthems. Making fun of politicians doesn’t land you in jail. The problem here is Woke Capitalists are gaining control. But their power can be curbed if people bothered with boycotting like stop going to Starbucks, McDonald’s and watching the latest movie and stop buying pro-sports team jerseys. Buy books without using Amazon and etc.

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True, but at least the liberal left is not always the government. In China the liberal left (yes you read that correctly, there is nothing so intolerant and dictatorial as a liberal) is always in power.

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Here all the liberal left can do is shout at you or say bad things about you on social media.

They haven’t put you in prison and haven’t tortured you, put you to death and have your organs harvested. Not yet anyway.

I’d rather be shouted at than tortured and killed. Big difference.

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tell that to the scores that have lost their livelihood.

Lost their livelihood due to the left?

What did the left do?

I lost my job too but that was because of the pandemic not because some liberal didn’t like my opinion.

I don’t think that’s a fair comparison to make considering what’s happened to dissenters in China.

On the topic of the thread, stuff like this law is why I don’t post much about China anywhere. It’s probably a little irrational on my part, but the odds that I travel to the country within the next seven years are pretty good, and I’m not eager to have something bad happen because of a tweet I’ve made. I doubt something like that would actually happen, but it’s one of those anxieties I get when I read about something enough times.
I admire the Hong Kong protestors, but it looks like the movement has tragically come to a screeching halt. I hope everything gets resolved without people disappearing.

Some countries still with an active extradition treaty with Hong Kong:
:us: US
:new_zealand: New Zealand
:uk: UK
:australia: Australia
:ireland: Ireland
:netherlands: Netherlands
:de: Germany
:philippines: Philippines
:kr: South Korea
:india: India
:portugal: Portugal

Pressure your elected officials to cancel any extradition treaty with Hong Kong. Now that Hong Kong is just an extension of the Communist regime, they’ll be more than happy to abuse those treaties.

You’re really stretching here. You haven’t defined terms, but you seem to be using “liberal left” to apply to anything left of US Republican… which apparently includes everything from US Democrats to Chinese Communists. It’s hard to take that seriously… talk about painting with a broad brush.
China is definitely Leftist, but I would never describe them as “liberal”. Socially liberal? Don’t think they’re Ok with homosexuality by and large…to give one example.
The United States was founded on classical liberal principles. It is by definition a liberal nation…and was deliberately founded as such. Communist China was founded on Leftist / Marxist principles, but not liberal principles.

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The US has done this on laws against other nations trading with Iran or Cuba. In that respect, are the US and China really that different?

Aren’t those based on foreign companies wanting to have access to the US and their capital? That’s rather different than a non-citizen expressing an opinion in a different country.

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