Chinese boy can't hear his cartoons, cuts high-rise worker's safety rope


#1

Saturday cartoons are very, very, very important to one 10-year-old Chinese boy.

A worker was installing lighting on the outside of a high-rise apartment building when a boy appeared at an eighth-floor window and began sawing through the worker’s safety rope. Apparently, the construction racket was drowning out the kid’s cartoons, and he decided this would be an effective way to restore some silence.

“I shouted at him to stop, but he didn’t listen and soon after, the rope was broken,” the worker told Chinese new outlet Xinhua. “That’s when I called to my workmate for help.”

theweek.com/article/index/267342/speedreads-chinese-boy-cant-hear-his-cartoons-cuts-high-rise-workers-safety-rope

Crazy world we live in. Alhamdulilah! The worker is okay.


#2

Good grief! What is the world coming to?
Glad to hear the worker is OK>

Mary.


#3

What a brat! :mad: And why wasn’t anyone home with him at the time?


#4

Wow. I am shocked that this boy would have done something so stupid. It makes me wonder if he doesn’t have some sort of medical condition which impairs his empathy or judgment.


#5

Yeah, like being a brat :smiley:

Seriously though, you could be right.


#6

Not medical, but social, the Little Emperor Syndrome. From Wikipedia:

The Little Emperor Syndrome (or Little Emperor Effect) is an aspect of China’s one-child policy where only children gain seemingly excessive amounts of attention from their parents and grandparents. Combined with increased spending power within the family unit and parents’ general desire for their child to experience the benefits they themselves were denied, the phenomenon is generally considered to be problematic. Andrew Marshall even argues that it is shaping Chinese society in unexpected ways[1] that may culminate into a future “behavioral time-bomb.”[2]

Little Emperors are primarily an urban phenomenon. The one-child policy generally only applies to urban communities and, given the value of labor, only children are not prevalent within rural communities. Economic development has not had as large an impact outside of urban centers.

Of course we have no way of knowing if this kid is a “little Emperor” of just a brat.


#7

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