CHRISMUKKAH


#1

[left]CHRISMUKKAH IS A MULTICULTURAL MESS: Hanukkah begins on December 7 at sundown and ends at nightfall on December 15. Chrismukkah begins at the same time as Hanukkah, but does not end until December 25, Christmas day. Chrismukkah is a new hybrid holiday that seeks to conflate Hanukkah and Christmas. It is a reflection of the high degree of intermarriage, especially in recent times, between Christians and Jews. Catholic League president William Donohue addressed this issue today: “Chrismukkah is a multicultural mess that glosses over the historical significance of both Hanukkah and Christmas. Not surprisingly, it is most popular with secular Jews and their equally non-observant Christian counterparts. Though the idea of Chrismukkah comes from a teen soap, ‘The O.C.,’ the person behind the marketing of Chrismukkah is Ron Gompertz. He readily admits that Chrismukkah is taking the secularization of ‘The Holidays’ one step further. “No doubt the motivation behind such so-called Merry Chrismukkah cards and Yamaclaus hats is benign, but that doesn’t empty the issue. Unlike Kwanzaa, which was created in the 1966 out of whole cloth (it is not an African tradition and it has nothing to do with religion), Chrismukkah merges two religious holidays. The effect of this blending is to dilute the distinct meaning of both Hanukkah and Christmas, thus ill-serving the interests of observant Jews and practicing Christians.[/left]
“In this vein, we would agree with the recent statement on mixed marriages prepared by the U.S. Catholic- Jewish Consultation Committee. It branded attempts to raise a child simultaneously as both Jewish and Catholic a ‘violation of the integrity of both religious traditions, at best, and, at worst, syncretism.’ From a Catholic perspective, anything which contributes to this phenomenon should be resisted, and that would include Chrismukkah.”
CATHOLIC LEAGUE AND NEW YORK BOARD OF RABBIS
Dr. William Donohue, President and CEO of the Catholic League, and Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, Executive Vice President of the New York Board of Rabbis, issued the following statement today on Chrismukkah: “We are deeply concerned about the spiritual misrepresentation of a newly created ‘holiday’ called Chrismukkah. While we as Jews and Christians practice our particular traditions, we also want to see the spiritual integrity of all faiths fully protected. Chanukah and Christmas celebrated during the same period should not be fused into some cultural combination that does not recognize the spiritual identity of our respective faiths. Historically, Chanukah recalls the battle for religious independence that would permit all groups to freely practice their separate traditions without compromise or coercion. Christmas marks a most sacred period announcing the birth of the Christian Messiah, and the beginning of a sacred relationship between Jesus and the Christian people. “Copying the tradition of another faith and calling it by another name is a form of shameful plagiarism we cannot condone. Frankly, those who seek to synthesize our spiritual traditions may be well intended, but they are insulting both of us simultaneously. “We Jews and Christians respect one another realizing that there is a time to be separate and a time to be together. We see each other as separate spiritual brothers and sisters who will work together to better the human family.”


#2

I found this to be really absurd and an indictment on how little people know about their own faith. I mean, c’mon, a menorah with candy canes sticking out of it? Candy canes don’t have anything to do with Christmas. A dreidl with a snowman and a reindeer? Please.

The entire concept is insulting to people of faith.


#3

[quote=condan]I found this to be really absurd and an indictment on how little people know about their own faith. I mean, c’mon, a menorah with candy canes sticking out of it? Candy canes don’t have anything to do with Christmas. A dreidl with a snowman and a reindeer? Please.

The entire concept is insulting to people of faith.
[/quote]

Unfortunately, people in mixed Marriages like these are going to uncritically embrace this marketing scheme as though it had a divine origin–because of their hearts’ desire to be closer to God as they understand Him. I have relatives in such a marriage and it will be very interesting to see how they react to this. They live in an atmosphere that is very sensitive to the novel and trendy.

On the other hand the Jewish member of my family long ago said to me something like this:

“I grew up in a Jewish family in New York. At Christmas there were Christmas trees everywhere. I loved Christmas. Which would you rather have, a Christmas tree with presents under it, or a Dreidl?”

So I can understand the ‘reasoning’ or the desire for a “blend” even as I heartily agree with its critics as cited here.

I also understand that it ultimately stems from materialism and not noticing the ‘Christ’ part of Christmas.


#4

What about Ramadan? The Muslims are still being left out. Maybe we should change the name to Chrismukkahn. :rolleyes:


#5

[quote=JMJ_Pinoy]What about Ramadan? The Muslims are still being left out. Maybe we should change the name to Chrismukkahn. :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Sorry, JMJ you’re missing a few. I think the Syncretism Express reads more like this:

Chrismukkahnzaa.

Solstice.


#6

[quote=JMJ_Pinoy]What about Ramadan? The Muslims are still being left out. Maybe we should change the name to Chrismukkahn. :rolleyes:
[/quote]

The next step is maybe Chrismukkanzaamadan


#7

[quote=jimmy]The next step is maybe Chrismukkanzaamadan
[/quote]

:rotfl:


#8

Correction Bob, its ChristmaKwanzukkah. You left out Kwanza. I still can’t find a nifty way to fit Solstace into the word. Christmakwanzukkace?


#9

Actually, there is a national radio personality by the name of Glenn Beck that has been talking on this subject for at least two years now. He calls it RamaHanuKwanzMas.

PF


#10

When I was a kid things where so much simpler!


#11

[quote=condan]I mean, c’mon, Candy canes don’t have anything to do with Christmas. QUOTE]

Actually, yes they do! It’s been a long time since I’ve read the story of the origin of candy canes, but they were made by a Christain candy maker. They are in the shape of a staff to represent Jesus the good shepherd, and if you turn the cane upside down it makes a “J”. Also the red and white stripes represent His blood and forgiveness/purity.

This is one part of Christmas that doesn’t have a secular origin, so definitely don’t write it off!
[/quote]


#12

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]Correction Bob, its ChristmaKwanzukkah. You left out Kwanza. I still can’t find a nifty way to fit Solstace into the word. Christmakwanzukkace?
[/quote]

Chrismukkanzaamadastace?


#13

[quote=JMJ_Pinoy]What about Ramadan? The Muslims are still being left out. Maybe we should change the name to Chrismukkahn. :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Wait…we’re still not there yet. Didn’t you mean Chrismukkahnawanza!


#14

There’s a commercial that combines most of the major religions in promoting a certain store. It’s almost like a parody of itself.

As for Chrismukkah and those who are supporting it, it just goes to show that P.T. Barnum was right that there is a sucker born every minute.

And in a fit of political incorrectness, may everyone have a merry, merry Christmas. Jesus is the reason for the season.

John


#15

Ack!! What a mess!! Only in America!!! :wink:


#16

I still have that Nickelodeon commercial in my head:

Happy HanuChrisRamaSolstKwanzaa to all!

How sad… :whacky:


closed #17

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