"Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again," but He's already right there on the altar?

Why at mass do we say “Christ will come again” when Jesus is already there? Wouldn’t it be more accurate to say “Christ will judge the world”?

We Catholics act like we’re waiting for Jesus to return to the world in his Second Coming, but we also believe that he is right there in front of us at mass, body blood soul and divinity. It seems to me that saying that Christ will come again is implying that he is somehow not here already. I feel like I’m supposed to feel that Jesus is really present at mass and in the tabernacle, yet I’m supposed to anxiously wait for when he really returns to earth.

Any help?

Well we are not supposed to be using that any longer because it is confusing and inaccurate. However He is Sacramentally present, at the end of time He will be physically present, just like he was in the upper room after the resurrection with the Apostles.

Catechism:

1402 In an ancient prayer the Church acclaims the mystery of the Eucharist: “O sacred banquet in which Christ is received as food, the memory of his Passion is renewed, the soul is filled with grace and a pledge of the life to come is given to us.” If the Eucharist is the memorial of the Passover of the Lord Jesus, if by our communion at the altar we are filled "with every heavenly blessing and grace,"239 then the Eucharist is also an anticipation of the heavenly glory.

1403 At the Last Supper the Lord himself directed his disciples’ attention toward the fulfillment of the Passover in the kingdom of God: "I tell you I shall not drink again of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom."240 Whenever the Church celebrates the Eucharist she remembers this promise and turns her gaze “to him who is to come.” In her prayer she calls for his coming: “Marana tha!” "Come, Lord Jesus!"241 "May your grace come and this world pass away!"242

1404 The Church knows that the Lord comes even now in his Eucharist and that he is there in our midst. However, his presence is veiled. Therefore we celebrate the Eucharist "awaiting the blessed hope and the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ,"243 asking "to share in your glory when every tear will be wiped away. On that day we shall see you, our God, as you are. We shall become like you and praise you for ever through Christ our Lord."244

1405 There is no surer pledge or dearer sign of this great hope in the new heavens and new earth "in which righteousness dwells,"245 than the Eucharist. Every time this mystery is celebrated, “the work of our redemption is carried on” and we "break the one bread that provides the medicine of immortality, the antidote for death, and the food that makes us live for ever in Jesus Christ."246

Yes and yes. Both/and. Parousia - Presence - Here and Now and yet - Maranatha, Come, Lord Jesus.

Christian faith is all about paradox.

Read Scott Hahn’s The Lamb’s Supper for a really nice look at this.

Christ will come again. This time in his glory. Not under the appearance of bread and wine.

Thanks for the replies, it makes more sense now.

Perhaps Jesus exists with us now under the appearances of bread and wine, because if he were physically present the Last Judgment would have to occur.

I accept with information:The Church knows that the Lord comes even now in his Eucharist and that he is there in our midst. However, his presence is veiled. Therefore we celebrate the Eucharist "awaiting the blessed hope and the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ,"243 asking "to share in your glory when every tear will be wiped away.

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