Christian fantasy fiction?

I recently downloaded Light of Eidon (Legends of the Guardian-King) to my Kindle and was excited to read a Christian based fantasy story... until I got through Chapter 2 and realized while Christian themed it seems to present the Catholic Church (that's not what it's called in the book) in a very negative light. Telling the main character who is about to become part of it that he is looking for Eidon (God) in the wrong place.

Can anyone recommend a Christian themed fantasy story that is not also anti-Catholic?

Lord of the Rings, probably the most Catholic work of fiction ever written.

Harry Potter, while not overtly Catholic, is also not anti-Catholic - just Christian in general.

[quote="Sailor_Kenshin, post:2, topic:239734"]
Lord of the Rings, probably the most Catholic work of fiction ever written.

Harry Potter, while not overtly Catholic, is also not anti-Catholic - just Christian in general.

[/quote]

Sorry I was going to but didn't clarify, have read LOTR already and do intend to eventually read Narnia as I understand it also has Christian themes as well.

I've also read all the HP books. :thumbsup:

One of my favourite fantasy series was the Deryni series by Katherine Kurtz. The Catholic Church wasn't specified, but the characters celebrated Mass, and several main characters were priests and bishops who had a reverence for God. It's not for children though, there's some graphic violence. On the other hand, the characters were highly principled and demonstrated admirable morals and virtues.

[quote="seagal, post:4, topic:239734"]
One of my favourite fantasy series was the Deryni series by Katherine Kurtz. The Catholic Church wasn't specified, but the characters celebrated Mass, and several main characters were priests and bishops who had a reverence for God. It's not for children though, there's some graphic violence. On the other hand, the characters were highly principled and demonstrated admirable morals and virtues.

[/quote]

Added to my amazon wishlist :)

[quote="mdrummer5, post:3, topic:239734"]
Sorry I was going to but didn't clarify, have read LOTR already and do intend to eventually read Narnia as I understand it also has Christian themes as well.

I've also read all the HP books. :thumbsup:

[/quote]

Well, I got nothin'. :D

I would LIKE to be able to read more such fantasy, so am anticipating anyone else's recommendations.

[quote="Sailor_Kenshin, post:6, topic:239734"]
Well, I got nothin'. :D

I would LIKE to be able to read more such fantasy, so am anticipating anyone else's recommendations.

[/quote]

I would recommend the any of the Drizzt books by RA Salvatore there are quite a few and it's best to start from the beginning but any of the several trilogies can be read without reading the others. They aren't Christian per se but I've never read any of them that I would consider anti-Christian either. Some of the characters refer to their own gods but as far as I know they're all fictional as is the land it takes place in and all of the other races besides humans.

‘The Once and Future King’ by TH White, it has a lot of themes of interest to a Christian and is not explicity anti-Catholic at any points. Here’s a great exchange between a young Arthur and Merlin where the two of them are discussing whether might makes right which is one of the major themes of the book:-

"By the way. You remember that argument we were having about aggression? Well, I have thought of a good reason for starting a war."
Merlyn froze.
“I would like to hear it.”
"A good reason for starting a war is simply to have a good reason! For instance, there might be a king who had discovered a new way of life for human beings — you know, something which would be good for them. It might even be the only way from saving them from destruction. Well, if the human beings were too wicked or too stupid to accept his way, he might have to force it on them, in their own interests by the sword."
The magician clenched his fists, twisted his gown into screws, and began to shake all over.
“Very interesting,” he said in a trembling voice. “Very interesting. There was just such a man when I was young — an Austrian who invented a new way of life and convinced himself that he was the chap to make it work. He tried to impose his reformation by the sword, and plunged the civilized world into misery and chaos. But the thing which this fellow had overlooked, my friend, was that he had had a predecessor in the reformation business, called Jesus Christ. Perhaps we may assume that Jesus knew as much as the Austrian did about saving people. But the odd thing is that Jesus did not turn the disciples into storm troopers, burn down the Temple at Jerusalem, and fix the blame on Pontius Pilate. On the contrary, he made it clear that the business of the philosopher was to make ideas available, and not to impose them on people.”

The reference to Hitler obviously dates it but the points Merlin makes are still worthwhile. Merlin lives backwards through time by the way, I had best mention that it occurs to me as without that context his remarks become confusing.

There’s a book by the German writer Han Bermann ‘The Stone and the Flute’ which is also a book full of Christian themes. Although like LOTR it takes place in a world where Christ is not explicity named. He worked as an editor for an association of Catholic libraries. This book deserves to be far better known to be honest.

Also there’s C.S. Lewis’ ‘Cosmic Trilogy’ which is sometimes considered sci-fi but I’d say it’s more fantasy with a few scientific elements. That’s pretty grim at points though. It’s nothing like Narnia and although Lewis is tackling many of the same themes it’s not written towards children. It also has what I find the most horrifice description of damnation and Satan in the whole of fantasy literature. It’s one of only a very few books to actually manage to scare me. It also ties in loosely with Tolkien’s Middle Earth in the third book via some references. Tolkien also intended Middle Earth to be the distant past of our own world and Lewis builds on that for a couple of references and allusions.

Thanks! I want to read that now!

Charles Williams writes some beautiful, adult fantasy (adult meaning difficult, not porno).
The Place of the Lion, All Hallows' Eve, War in Heaven, 7 in all.
Also George MacDonald's books: At the Back of the North Wind, Lilith, the Princess and the Goblin.
These writers may be Anglican, Williams was a friend of CS Lewis, but definitely Christians.

Thanks for the responses all... now I just have to prioritize lol

I know an author who writes Christian fiction fantasy and is faithful to Church teachings (even about the rules on women clergy!) while holding ancient Judaism in a positive light.

Me! :)

The Twelfth Window and Heroes And Angels are part of a 3-book series that I wrote in 2007 and 2010, respectively. I haven't written the third one yet.

Check them out on Amazon, if you like.

[quote="BouncingBall, post:12, topic:239734"]
I know an author who writes Christian fiction fantasy and is faithful to Church teachings (even about the rules on women clergy!) while holding ancient Judaism in a positive light.

Me! :)

The Twelfth Window and Heroes And Angels are part of a 3-book series that I wrote in 2007 and 2010, respectively. I haven't written the third one yet.

Check them out on Amazon, if you like.

[/quote]

Both on my wishlist :)

I read through the "look inside" portion of The Twelth Window and so far so good :thumbsup: While I of course like the story of Jesus I'm curious about the high school parallel (which is what I assume it to be based on what I've read so far and the product description)

I have a decent sized list now... so you have plenty of time to write the third while I'm making my way through :)

Hey @mdrummer!

Well, I wrote the original skeleton of The Twelfth Window when I was in high school. So I kept the story in that setting because I wanted it to be accessible to high-school aged readers :) At the time, I was ministering more than normal to that demographic, too.

I am glad you liked what you saw! Cheers...:thumbsup:

I just finished A Canticle for Leibowitz--I'd had it for years and never read it; it had been on my "bucket list." Sci fi, and thoroughly 100 percent Catholic. An amazing book!

[quote="Luvadoxi, post:15, topic:239734"]
I just finished A Canticle for Leibowitz--I'd had it for years and never read it; it had been on my "bucket list." Sci fi, and thoroughly 100 percent Catholic. An amazing book!

[/quote]

Yes a brilliant book and a shame that Miller eventually lost his faith and committed suicide :( He was a man troubled with mental illness throughout his life sadly and wrote far less than should have been the case. But 'A Canticle for Leibowitz' is a towering work. If you want another work that is equally great but less overtly religious (although it has many thought provoking moments) try 'Earth Endures'.

Some of Ursula LeGuin's novels are very interesting on religious themes. She is not Christian, but she deals with the big questions in a very thoughtful way, including how society interacts with religion.

Madeline L'Engle was an Anglican writer, although much of her stuff is directed towards Young Adults it is very well done.

Some of Arthur C. Clark's novels are interesting on religion. Some of them are hard on religion, but they are, I think, never unfair.

That's so tragic about Miller; I read in the author info. that he had been in WWII as a tail gunner in one of the bombing runs that destroyed the monastery of St. Benedict (Monte Cassino?) I wonder if that continued to haunt him. Thanks for the other book reference--Earth Endures. This thread is great--I'm collecting a long list, too!

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