"Christian" hijacked by Protestants?


#1

Every time I arrive at a “Christian” website, it’s actually Protestant. ChristianAnswers.net, for example. I used to go there, until I found one of their sections that preached against the Catholic Church. Now, when I want to go to a Christian website, or read a Christian book, I need to make sure it has the word “Catholic” in it.

I suppose the word “Protestant” doesn’t sound so appealing. Any thoughts on this?


#2

[quote=Archbishop 10-K]Every time I arrive at a “Christian” website, it’s actually Protestant. ChristianAnswers.net, for example. I used to go there, until I found one of their sections that preached against the Catholic Church. Now, when I want to go to a Christian website, or read a Christian book, I need to make sure it has the word “Catholic” in it.

I suppose the word “Protestant” doesn’t sound so appealing. Any thoughts on this?
[/quote]

I understand your frustration, but stuff happens, and you just have to work around it, that’s how we got to be called Catholic.

***“Christian is my name, and Catholic my surname. The one designates me, while the other makes me specific. Thus am I attested and set apart…When we are called Catholics it is by this appellation that our people are kept apart from any heretical name.” * (St. Pacian of Barcelona, )

Joao
**


#3

The same thing has happened with Bibles. You never see a Bible that is labeled “Protestant,” but every Bible you pick up that is simply labeled “Bible” is missing the deuteros and is obviously the Protestant Bible. You have to specifically look for the phrase “Catholic Bible” or “with Apocropha” if you want a Bible with all the books in it.

Of course, historically speaking, I think that most of the time when the early Church Fathers refered to the Church, they called it either the “Church” or the “Catholic Church,” not the “Christian Church.” This was done to emphasize the unity in the one true Church. There were other heretics who considered their own congregations to be Christian churches, but they believed different doctrines and were not a part of the whole Church. So whenever people wanted to refer to the one true Church (even the heretics), they refered to it as the Catholic Church. St. Augustine puts it this way:

*“We must hold to the Christian religion and to communication in her Church, which is Catholic and which is called Catholic not only by her own members but even by all her enemies. For when heretics or the adherents of schisms talk about her, not among themselves but with strangers, willy-nilly they call her nothing else but Catholic. For they will not be understood unless they distinguish her by this name which the whole world employs in her regard” (The True Religion 7:12 [A.D. 390]).

“We believe in the holy Church, that is, the Catholic Church; for heretics and schismatics call their own congregations churches. But heretics violate the faith itself by a false opinion about God; schismatics, however, withdraw from fraternal love by hostile separations, although they believe the same things we do. Consequently, neither heretics nor schismatics belong to the Catholic Church; not heretics, because the Church loves God, and not schismatics, because the Church loves neighbor” (Faith and Creed 10:21 [A.D. 393]). *

So all things considered, I guess I don’t mind having to look for the word “Catholic” seeing as how the early Catholics kinda had to do the same.


#4

I don’t know if “Christian” was hijacked by the Protestant, but rather it is the more accepted form of Christianity in our society. The fact of the matter is that Catholics are not as prominent in the United States and could even be considered the minority compared to other cultures. Have you ever heard of the term WASP? This term sums up the reason why the Catholic sect of Christianity is not nearly as prominent. The point is that most of the material you are searching for is promoted by Protestants because this country was founded on Protestant ideals.


#5

I have an European online friend who happens to be living in the UK and she happens to be Catholic. She said she had never in her life heard the notion that Catholics were somehow not Christian until she and some Americans were discussing it. In Europe if you say ‘Christian’ …Catholicism is automatically included. She was shocked that it was divided like that here.

dream wanderer


#6

I learned that protestants ‘hijacked’ the word ‘Christian’ when I walked into a Christian bookstore last year to buy a ‘complete’ Bible. I looked around and only found incomplete Bibles with 66 books only. I asked the worker if they had any complete Bibles with the “Apocrypha” or “Deuterocanonical” texts. She looked at me like I was speaking Greek or Latin. Maybe I was?:whacky: She asked the owner and neither had ever heard of them. This was a rather large Christian bookstore too.

I told them that the ‘original’ KJV (the AKJV) had more then 66 books in it and if course they argued with me and said I was mistaken. They looked on their computer and low and behold, they were wrong and I was right. They said they would order me the Bible I wanted but I just took my business elsewhere. They were very polite and nice though.

This store also had nothing on the shelves relating to the Catholic Church. Some stuff might even have been viewed as anti-Catholic.:mad:

I went to another smaller “Christian” bookstore and they knew what I was wanting but did not stock it since they catered to protestant ‘Christians’ and not Catholics. They were nice though and would order the books I wanted. I said no and left.:frowning:

Now I just go to Amazon.com or “Catholic” bookstores. I have seen some “Christian” bookstores with Catholic sections in them but none in the area where I live. If I can find a “Christian” bookstore in the Tulsa area when I move that has a “Catholic” section I would be more then happy to give them my business, and will. I like some of what these “Christian” bookstores carry but I have a problem when I am discriminated against.:tsktsk:


#7

Do not make the mistake of thinking that the use of the tern “Christian” as opposed to Catholic or Protetsant is a purely anti Catholic thing. That is not always the case. The first time I heard this distinction was back in the 70s and it was from neighbors who were Evangelical Protestants of the Presbyterian flavor. Thay used it to refer to themselves before and after their “born again” od conversion experience. They said, “We used to be Methodists until we became Christians.” These are people who had been raised in Protestant churches and were regular church going people. For them the distinction was between nominal Christians, whether Catholic or Protestant, and “born again” Christian. They experienced their conversion or being “born again” while watching a Billy Graham Crusade on TV. Now, I will grant you that probably all Catholics fell into the first (non Christian) category, while not all other Protestants did, but it was not a strictly anti Catholic thing. It took me a while to figure out what they actually meant and even longer to get used to hearing them say it.


#8

The term Christian has not been hijacked by Protestants, it has been abdicated by Catholics. I love the way that relevant radio refers to their programing as “Catholic Christian.”

As I have said on other threads, when I was young and I asked my Catholic friends if they were Christian, they replied “no, I am Catholic.” Who can blame Protestants for thinking that Catholics are not Christian if Catholics themselves do not claim the name!

If you want people to know that you are a Christian, you need to use the term to refer to yourself and your church and teach your children to do the same! It can change, and I think it already is!


#9

[quote=iguana27]The term Christian has not been hijacked by Protestants, it has been abdicated by Catholics. I love the way that relevant radio refers to their programing as “Catholic Christian.”

As I have said on other threads, when I was young and I asked my Catholic friends if they were Christian, they replied “no, I am Catholic.” Who can blame Protestants for thinking that Catholics are not Christian if Catholics themselves do not claim the name!

If you want people to know that you are a Christian, you need to use the term to refer to yourself and your church and teach your children to do the same! It can change, and I think it already is!
[/quote]

You are exactly right. I would say 75-85% of my Catholic friends consider themselves Catholic and not Christian. And I am not talking about a handful of people either…

I find that sad.

~mango~


#10

If the Catholic Church wants the sole rights to the word “Christian” I do not have a problem with that… The last thing that I want to be is covetous over a collection of letters. People can call me whatever they want, it will have no effect on my beliefs in Christ or who I am.


#11

[quote=Archbishop 10-K]Every time I arrive at a “Christian” website, it’s actually Protestant. ChristianAnswers.net, for example. I used to go there, until I found one of their sections that preached against the Catholic Church. Now, when I want to go to a Christian website, or read a Christian book, I need to make sure it has the word “Catholic” in it.

I suppose the word “Protestant” doesn’t sound so appealing. Any thoughts on this?
[/quote]

What do you expect, satan is behind it, I couldn’t be bothered posting on a so called Christian website.


#12

[quote=Malachi4U]If I can find a “Christian” bookstore in the Tulsa area when I move that has a “Catholic” section I would be more then happy to give them my business, and will.
[/quote]

I don’t mean to “hijack” this thread, just wanted to tell Malachi4U that we have TWO Catholic bookstores in Tulsa! And they will be grateful for your business!

Brenda M.


#13

[quote=Archbishop 10-K]Every time I arrive at a “Christian” website, it’s actually Protestant. ChristianAnswers.net, for example. I used to go there, until I found one of their sections that preached against the Catholic Church. Now, when I want to go to a Christian website, or read a Christian book, I need to make sure it has the word “Catholic” in it.

I suppose the word “Protestant” doesn’t sound so appealing. Any thoughts on this?
[/quote]

This may come from the fact that there are groups of these “Christians” who don’t even consider Catholics as their brother Christians. Besides, using the generic term “Christian”, whether deliberate or not, serves to camouflage the fact that they **are themselves badly divided **into differing sects and denominations, which in itself is scandalous.

Gerry :slight_smile:


#14

[quote=RobedWithLight]This may come from the fact that there are groups of these “Christians” who don’t even consider Catholics as their brother Christians. Besides, using the generic term “Christian”, whether deliberate or not, serves to camouflage the fact that they **are themselves badly divided **into differing sects and denominations, which in itself is scandalous.

REPLY:
Don’t know that I agree with you.
Let me ask how you would classify someone who professes the Nicene Creed, but does not subcribe to all of the other dogma required by the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church.

I think Christian is not an incorrect term to describe them.
[/quote]


#15

I hate it when people say, “Are you Catholic, or are you Chirstian”

I tell them that is a stupid question, and walk away.


#16

[quote=Archbishop 10-K]Every time I arrive at a “Christian” website, it’s actually Protestant. ChristianAnswers.net, for example. I used to go there, until I found one of their sections that preached against the Catholic Church. Now, when I want to go to a Christian website, or read a Christian book, I need to make sure it has the word “Catholic” in it.

I suppose the word “Protestant” doesn’t sound so appealing. Any thoughts on this?
[/quote]

Absolutely, I have noticed the same phenomenon myself. And there is no doubt in my mind that it is intentional and it excludes Catholics. This use of “Christian” to mean “Protestant” almost always is by non-denominational Protestants. I sense that they view “Christian” as a term that is up for grabs because Catholics and main-line Protestant denominations use their own denomination designation. The non-denoms don’t want to be viewed in negative terms–non-denominational or Protestant–because those terms suggest what they are not (denominational) and protesting. They see Christian as much more positive and act like it only refers to whomever they say it does–that is people who have been “born-again” and “take the Lord Jesus as their personal savior”. As soon as someone tells me that they are “Christian”, my antennae go up because I am pretty sure they will get that “oooh” look on their face when I say I am Catholic. Actually, I almost always say that I am a “Catholic Christian” in response, though I sense that such people believe Catholic and Christian are contradictory terms.


#17

Help me here, good people.

What, in your mind, is the difference between ‘evangelical’ and ‘Christian?’

I had thought E was a subset of C, as I think RCC, Orthodox, Lutherans and Episcopalians are.

My sense from the thread is you disagree with the notion that enthusiastic evangelicals are in fact Christians.

Any thoughts? Do I misread?


#18

[quote=maisua]Help me here, good people.

What, in your mind, is the difference between ‘evangelical’ and ‘Christian?’

I had thought E was a subset of C, as I think RCC, Orthodox, Lutherans and Episcopalians are.

My sense from the thread is you disagree with the notion that enthusiastic evangelicals are in fact Christians.

Any thoughts? Do I misread?
[/quote]

No, we are not saying that evangelicals are not Christian. We are saying that evangelicals think they are the only Christians and evangelicals don’t consider Catholics, Episcopalians, Lutherans, Methodists, etc. to be Christians. And that is why we are saying that the Evangelicals have hijacked the term Christian as if they are the only Christians.


#19

[quote=maisua].

REPLY:
Don’t know that I agree with you.
Let me ask how you would classify someone who professes the Nicene Creed, but does not subcribe to all of the other dogma required by the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church.

I think Christian is not an incorrect term to describe them.
[/quote]

I believe Catholics would have no problems calling Protestants as our brother Christians. Official Church documents often refer to Protestants as our separated brethren, and I fully agree with that designation, although the Church does not refer to Protestant denominations as “churches” but rather as "ecclesial communities.

However, the problem here is that not all Protestants are charitable and courteous enough to extend the same designation of “brother Christians” to Catholics. Where do you think the phrase “Whore of Babylon” came from?

By the way, we don’t refer to the Church as the “Roman” Catholic Church. IT is simply called The Catholic Church.

Gerry :slight_smile:


#20

[quote=La Chiara]No, we are not saying that evangelicals are not Christian. We are saying that evangelicals think they are the only Christians and evangelicals don’t consider Catholics, Episcopalians, Lutherans, Methodists, etc. to be Christians. And that is why we are saying that the Evangelicals have hijacked the term Christian as if they are the only Christians.
[/quote]

I recollect a story told by a pastor–call him ‘Smith’-- one time about when he was in Bible College and had been sent out to do some street evangelism. He asked one person (call the person ‘Jones’) ,

Smith: “Sir: are you a Christian?”

Jnes: “Young man I have been a (denominational Protestant) minister for years!”

Smith: “Oh, I see. But are you a Christian?”

The upshot of the story is that, after had gotten over his umbrage at the question, ‘Jones’ came to realize that he was in fact NOT a ‘Christian’ in the sense of having the personal relationship with Christ that he had ought. Now ‘Jones’ was of a wholly-different denomination than ‘Smith’, who was attempting to evangelize him, but ‘Smith’s’ primary objective was not to make converts for his own denomination but to bring people to a personal saving knowledge of Christ. ‘Jones’ in fact went back to his own congregation and–as Smith told the story–transformed what had been a rather sedate and modest congregation into a lively and growing one.

Incidentally–similar stories are sometimes told by Roman Catholic spiritual leaders who were brought up short by the realization that at some point in their lives they did not know God as they ought. The language and style of the story is usually quite different, but there is a widespread and general understanding that it is possible to be a churchgoer for years without truly being spiritual. (continued).


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