Christian Prayer


#1

If I only intend on praying Matins, Vespers and Compline, would it work to get Christian Prayer instead of the more expensive 4-volume Liturgy of the Hours?

And on a similar note, does one pray the Invitiatory Psalm first no matter what, even if circumstances are hypothetically weird enough that Compline’s the first hour prayed?


#2

Christian prayer includes: Lauds, Vespers, Compline and a selection of office of readings, it does not carry Matins

Invitatory Psalm
for me:
Yes. Even though it seems to be the last prayer of the day, LOH is being prayed every time, everywhere.


#3

Office of Readings is often used as Matins particularly in religious communities.

That said, Christian Prayer alone does not allow one to recite that office completely unless one has a separate lectionary (biblical and patristic/hagiographic).

I do have a separate (approved) 2-year lectionary that I used (same as at my abbey) but I use the 4-volume anyway.


#4

IIRC the Invitatory may only be used with Office of Readings or Morning Prayer.


#5

From the General Instructions of the Liturgy of the Hours

  1. The invitatory is placed at the beginning of the whole sequence of the day’s prayer, that is, it precedes either morning prayer or the office of readings, whichever of these liturgical rites begins the day. The invitatory psalm with its antiphon may be omitted, however, when the invitatory is the prelude to morning prayer.

So the instructions are pretty clear I would say in that the invitatory only precludes the Office of Readings or Lauds.


#6

Yeah… I found out after posting that Morning Prayer is actually Lauds, not Matins like I thought it was. So I actually plan on praying Lauds, Vespers and Compline. Which mean that Christian Prayer should work.


#7

I would recommend you get Christian Prayer based on what your plans are. Within the next 5-10 years, the Liturgy of the Hours will be retranlated anyway, so it would make sense to me to go with the less expensive route.


#8

I hope they get there… but I’m not holding my breath. The project to produce a new lectionary using a bible based on the RSV lineage (initially a modified NRSV… then changed to ESV) has been halted at a very late stage (after vatican approval and printing started!!! - then the vatican recalled their permission and asked for further changes… then it looks like the bishops argued so much the project got called off). This was to be used in all english speaking countries outside the USA.

The copyright Holders of the NRSV and RSV (Same body the NCC) wont negotiate on using thier bibles, and the existing lectionaries using both those translations are out of print with no more scheduled. The Cardinal NRSV lectionary was halted after production of the 1st volume and the 2nd Volume was never finished. - The Ignatius RSV lectionary was fully approved for worldwide use, but is never going to be re-printed, and the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter was sold the entire remaindered stock. (They’re selling copies to other countries ordinariates.
It is in print in South Africa where the RSV is no longer a copyrighted translation, but those cant be sold in the US, UK, or other countries with more traditional copyright laws (99 years in the US, death of last author plus 70 years in the UK)

As the Psalter in the UK uses the Grail psalms, and the New Grail translation does not comply with Liturgiam Authenticam, there’s no need to produce a new version using the New Grail. The Scripture translations in the UK version are a mix of RSV and Grail, so again as there’s no prohibition on reprinting those I see no problem.
The other bits like the Antiphons, repeated prayers and other bits etc do vary between the US and UK editions. Frankly I very much prefer the translation used in the UK.
“Oh God come to our aid”… sounds nicer that “Our Assistance”… it’s also more rhythmical.
Similarly with the close:
“May God grant us a quiet night and a perfect end”
is far nicer to go to sleep to than
“and a perfect death”…

I’ll fully agree that these are minor issues. I also note that I very much prefer the UK translations of the gospel canticles (Grail) than the international ICPEL translations given as an optional variation in the UK but which form the official translation in the US.

I concede that these preferences are very personal. I like the musical translations. The Office is supposed to be sung, or recited in a manner that reflects the musical character of the psalms and canticles. That’s what the Grail translation is intended to maximise.
These are used for praying the psalms. A theological study of them can utilise the more formal equivalence translations of which there are many.

I wasn’t aware of that… I thought you were supposed to say the Invitatory for whichever your first Hour was… but that should be Matins (Readings) or (Lauds) Morning Prayer unless you don’t make it to prayer until after noon. (Matins, however, can be said at any time… but takes more than the 15 mins I would normally allow for my morning prayer.)
Can you link to the appropriate reference in the General Instruction or other suitable rule?


#9

Here’s the reference in the GILH:

  1. The invitatory is placed at the beginning of the whole sequence of the day’s prayer, that is, it precedes either morning prayer or the office of readings, whichever of these liturgical rites begins the day. The invitatory psalm with its antiphon may be omitted, however, when the invitatory is the prelude to morning prayer.

The instruction has no allowance for the Invitatory being used to open any other office besides the OOR or Morning Prayer.


#10

New Grail translation does not comply with Liturgiam Authenticam

Rome confirmed the Revised Grail Psalter (from Conception Abbey in Missouri) which had been approved by the US Bishops Conference. I have a copy and the appended confirmation letter states that it is to be used in all future liturgical books.


#11

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