Christian Universities: Will They Obey God or Man?

It’s by design. As I, and others, have repeatedly warned, the establishment of so-called “gay marriage” as a newfangled federal “right,” and the free exercise of religion as guaranteed by the First Amendment simply cannot coexist in harmony. Things diametrically at odds cannot possibly occupy, with any coherence, the same time and space.

The secular left is tripping over itself right now to prove my point. In the wake of last month’s Obergefell v. Hodges opinion – an opinion that somehow divined a top secret “constitutional right” for Patrick Henry to “marry” Henry Patrick – liberals are now demanding, as both Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito predicted, that Christian university’s immediately abandon recognition of, and obedience to, God’s unequivocal natural sexual order, and adopt, instead, the new pagan orthodoxy.

townhall.com/columnists/mattbarber/2015/07/20/christian-universities-will-they-obey-god-or-man-n2027261

Most “Christian” universities are already nominally so. Patrick Buchanan went so far as to there are no more truly Catholic universities (I’d beg to differ on a handful, like Steubenville, Ave Maria, and Benectine).

At the same time, I have friends whose faith has flourished at secular universities. One of the best Catholic Campus Centers I know of is, ironically, at the hippie-commune University of Kansas; many priests and seminarians in my archdiocese went there.

You realize that the free exercise clause is not absolute and has never been interpreted as being absolute.

Ask people who smoke peyote for Native American services or want to practice polygamy in accordance with their god’s law

Native Americans CAN smoke peyote for religious purposes. Federal laws were passed to specifically protect these constitutional rights.

Think about it this way. Christians who are against gay marriage for religious reasons are still a large proportion of this country. What purpose would it serve to alienate and marginalize those institutions? They aren’t harming anyone–least of all homosexuals–who can get secular and religious education at any institution.

There are two types of Christian in the U.S.: the worldly Christian and the true Christian. The worldly Christian believes in all Church doctrine except the ones that contradict the current flow of the waves of the world. The true Christian, of course, follows true, unchanging doctrine.

This isn’t new; the Church has always been in the same situation:

There was a man who sowed his field with clean seed; but while all the world was asleep, an enemy of his came and scattered tares among the wheat, and was gone. So, when the blade had sprung up and come into ear, the tares, too, came to light; and the farmer’s men went to him and said, Sir, was it not clean seed thou didst sow in thy field? How comes it, then, that there are tares in it? He said, An enemy has done it. And his men asked him, Wouldst thou then have us go and gather them up? But he said, No; or perhaps while you are gathering the tares you will root up the wheat with them. Leave them to grow side by side till harvest, and when harvest-time comes I will give the word to the reapers, Gather up the tares first, and tie them in bundles to be burned, and store the wheat in my barn (Matthew 13:24-30).

Christi pax,

Lucretius

I think you will find that the LCMS University system will stand by Biblical standards when it comes to the issues that are becoming social norms. My alma mater Concordia University, Ann Arbor, MI stands solid on God’s Word in its curriculum and standards for students, faculty and staff.

God bless all!!

Rita

Nope. People who follow Native American religions, who insist in consuming illegal drugs can very much be prosecuted and lose govt employment.

They cannot be prosecuted or discriminated against by the government. Federal law is quite clear:

42 U.S. Code § 1996a - Traditional Indian religious use of peyote

(1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the use, possession, or transportation of peyote by an Indian for bona fide traditional ceremonial purposes in connection with the practice of a traditional Indian religion is lawful, and shall not be prohibited by the United States or any State. No Indian shall be penalized or discriminated against on the basis of such use, possession or transportation, including, but not limited to, denial of otherwise applicable benefits under public assistance programs.

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