Christianity Vs. Catholicism


#1

What’s the difference between a Catholic and a Christian?


#2

[quote=jc91087]What’s the difference between a Catholic and a Christian?
[/quote]

There is no “versus.” There is no “difference.”

All Catholics are Christians.

Many Christians reject the teaching and discipline of the Church and are not Catholic.


#3

[quote=jc91087]What’s the difference between a Catholic and a Christian?
[/quote]

Catholic = Christian!

Protestant = Christian

We’re all Christians, k?


#4

Ok, let me rephrase this: What’s the difference between a Catholic and a Protestant?


#5

[quote=jc91087]Ok, let me rephrase this: What’s the difference between a Catholic and a Protestant?
[/quote]

What’s the real question?


#6

Hello,

I saw from your profile that you are around my son’s age.

For the first 1500 years of Christianity everyone was Catholic. Martin Luther broke away from the Catholic church in the 1500’s. The term Protestant is a form of the word Protest, meaning that they were protesting the Catholic church.

So the short answer is that just about any Christian who is not a Catholic is a Protestant.

As far as the difference, that depends on the denominations. Protestants are a group with vaired beliefs and practices. If you could be specific I could help more.


#7

[quote=jc91087]Ok, let me rephrase this: What’s the difference between a Catholic and a Protestant?
[/quote]

Sounds to me like you’re trying to figure out if a Catholic is a Christian or not or if a Protestant is not or is!
:confused:


#8

From reading some of the other posts I get the feeling that you guys think that anyone who isn’t a Catholic isn’t really a Christian.


#9

[quote=Paris Blues]Sounds to me like you’re trying to figure out if a Catholic is a Christian or not or if a Protestant is not or is!
:confused:
[/quote]

Maybe this is the first time that he has asked questions about religion. It could be that he is simply curious.


#10

[quote=jc91087]From reading some of the other posts I get the feeling that you guys think that anyone who isn’t a Catholic isn’t really a Christian.
[/quote]

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! Don’t go there!!! Protestants ARE Christian, yet they sometimes attack the CC!
:tsktsk:


#11

[quote=deb1]Maybe this is the first time that he has asked questions about religion. It could be that he is simply curious.
[/quote]

True, you’re right. Maybe I’ll get off my “high horse”. I’m just so “sensitive” when it comes to issues like this, that I may sound kinda harsh!

SORRY!
:crying:


#12

[quote=jc91087]From reading some of the other posts I get the feeling that you guys think that anyone who isn’t a Catholic isn’t really a Christian.
[/quote]

No, we do not believe that nonCatholics are not Christians. Pope John Paul 2 called Protestants 'our seperated brothers" so we do see that Protestants can be Christian.


#13

[quote=Paris Blues]True, you’re right. Maybe I’ll get off my “high horse”. I’m just so “sensitive” when it comes to issues like this, that I may sound kinda harsh!

SORRY!
:crying:
[/quote]

You didn’t sound harsh at all.:slight_smile: So, don’t worry.

There are so many fundamentalist who need convincing that Catholics are Christian that we can all be forgiven for being a bit oversensitive.


#14

The term “Christian” is often used to refer to all those who profess a belief in Christ.

However, only one Church was set up by Christ. We believe, as Catholics, it was this Church. The Catholic church. But, all believers in Christ are firm believers in the divinity of Christ, we simply disagree on teachings and so on.

We trace our roots to the apostles of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

The protestants dont.

It is a matter of seeking Truth.

Our Lord promised to lead all those who searched for Truth to it.

The main difference between catholics and protestants, is that Catholics believe that tradition AND the bible are important in determining our beliefs.

The protestants (in general) go only by the bible (which, incidentally, was pulled together by the early Catholic Church). Without the Catholic Church there would be no bible, and yet the protestants reject the authority of the Catholic church.

A very sad situation indeed.

Your brother in Christ

Andre.


#15

[quote=Magicsilence]The term “Christian” is often used to refer to all those who profess a belief in Christ.

However, only one Church was set up by Christ. We believe, as Catholics, it was this Church. The Catholic church. But, all believers in Christ are firm believers in the divinity of Christ, we simply disagree on teachings and so on.

We trace our roots to the apostles of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

The protestants dont.

It is a matter of seeking Truth.

Our Lord promised to lead all those who searched for Truth to it.

The main difference between catholics and protestants, is that Catholics believe that tradition AND the bible are important in determining our beliefs.

The protestants (in general) go only by the bible (which, incidentally, was pulled together by the early Catholic Church). Without the Catholic Church there would be no bible, and yet the protestants reject the authority of the Catholic church.

A very sad situation indeed.

Your brother in Christ

Andre.
[/quote]

You know it’s funny… one of the main things that I hear from the catholics about the protestants is that they can trace their lineage back to the apostles but the protestants can’t. Huh. Well, I do wonder about this. The thing is the Catholic Church was the main religion for christians up to a certain time right? Then there are those who broke off of that church because they felt that the CC had taken things a bit far and had strayed from the original truth. Am I correct so far? So in essence. We, as protestants, can trace ourselves back to the apostles. We didn’t just sprout out of nowhere we branched off of the CC.


#16

In my experience, I have found very few “Protestants” that will admit that at one time they were part of the CC.


#17

[quote=Singinbeauty]You know it’s funny… one of the main things that I hear from the catholics about the protestants is that they can trace their lineage back to the apostles but the protestants can’t. Huh. Well, I do wonder about this. The thing is the Catholic Church was the main religion for christians up to a certain time right? Then there are those who broke off of that church because they felt that the CC had taken things a bit far and had strayed from the original truth. Am I correct so far? So in essence. We, as protestants, can trace ourselves back to the apostles. We didn’t just sprout out of nowhere we branched off of the CC.
[/quote]

Ah. Anglican “branch theory.” But even branch theory holds to the necessity of Apostolic Succession.

Yes, Protestantism did migrate out of Catholicism. And Reformation-linked Protestants (as opposed to idiopathic eruptions of Christian faith groups) still hold to the first four ecumenical councils (or at least to the parts that define the doctrine of God).

But Catholic Ecclesiology requires organic physical and visible union with the Church through Apostolic Succession, so the break was catastrophic because it required abandonment of all Sacraments except Baptism, and abandonment of the essential concept of “Church,” with the consequent invention of the “invisible church of true believers.”


#18

[quote=Singinbeauty]You know it’s funny… one of the main things that I hear from the catholics about the protestants is that they can trace their lineage back to the apostles but the protestants can’t. Huh. Well, I do wonder about this. The thing is the Catholic Church was the main religion for christians up to a certain time right? Then there are those who broke off of that church because they felt that the CC had taken things a bit far and had strayed from the original truth. Am I correct so far? So in essence. We, as protestants, can trace ourselves back to the apostles. We didn’t just sprout out of nowhere we branched off of the CC.
[/quote]

If you reject the authority of the one true Church then you have left the institution. You can no longer claim to be part of those who have trace their roots back to Christ.

I can feel the anger that will be felt by both parties if we continue to argue over this position. May i humbly apologise for any bad sentiment stirred in you over my previous posting.

I think it best if i leave now this discussion, entrusting all to My Lord who knows what is best for all.

May Christ guide us both to Him.

Hail Christ Our King, Lord Of All.

In Him alone do I trust.

In Christ.

Andre.


#19

[quote=Magicsilence]If you reject the authority of the one true Church then you have left the institution. You can no longer claim to be part of those who have trace their roots back to Christ.
[/quote]

Yet, scripture teaches the the “church” isn’t an institution – it’s a body of true believers (a/k/a Christians). To be a part of the true church, you must believe that Jesus is our Lord and Savior… and there are some Catholics who hold this belief… and there are some Protestants who hold this belief.

If someone isn’t a part of the Roman Catholic Church, that doesn’t mean that the person can’t claim to be a part of the Church of Christ, because being a part of this exclusive Church depends on what’s in your heart and soul to believe; not where you congregate or what label you’ve affixed to yourself. A Christian is someone who has COMPLETELY trusted Jesus for their salvation.


#20

[quote=ChristianWAB]Yet, scripture teaches the the “church” isn’t an institution – it’s a body of true believers (a/k/a Christians). To be a part of the true church, you must believe that Jesus is our Lord and Savior… and there are some Catholics who hold this belief… and there are some Protestants who hold this belief.

If someone isn’t a part of the Roman Catholic Church, that doesn’t mean that the person can’t claim to be a part of the Church of Christ, because being a part of this exclusive Church depends on what’s in your heart and soul to believe; not where you congregate or what label you’ve affixed to yourself. A Christian is someone who has COMPLETELY trusted Jesus for their salvation.
[/quote]

Very true.

But this was never an either or scenario.

Why can you not accept that the Body Of Christ is both visible and invisible.

The Holy Spirit guides the Church, but that doesnt mean He cannot enter into the heart of a non-catholic.


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