Christmas a Non-Religious Holiday For Half of Americans


#1

huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/18/christmas-non-religious_n_4453828.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003

"The Pew Research Center's survey on Christmas observations, released Wednesday, shows a nation where Christmas continues to be incredibly popular, but also that the day is increasingly a non-religious cultural event, especially among younger generations."


#2

Of course it is!!!

You can get stuff AND not be bound by the chains of a man-made religion and a fairy-tale god.
**
~THE ABOVE STATEMENT IS MASSIVELY SARCASTIC~**

If any of my close friends were avowed atheists, I would not buy them CHRISTMAS presents, send them CHRISTMAS cards, or wish them a merry CHRISTMAS.

As a wise man once said; "in for a penny, in for a pound". If you refuse to acknowledge Christ, you can't possibly want to celebrate His Nativity, right?

:christmastree1:


#3

There was a story on the news where the neighbors were complaining about one family’s Christmas decorations on their house/lawn. They had a lot of lights and inflatable decorations, including reindeer, Santa, snowmen and a manger scene. The neighbors were complaining that they did not want to be exposed to that family’s religious views, and requested them to take it down. A boy, maybe 12 yrs old or so, was being interviewed on TV about it and he said something along the lines of “we don’t all celebrate their religion so we don’t want to be exposed to it everyday.” This kid was wearing a Santa hat. :banghead:


#4

This is new? I feel as if it's always been this way.


#5

Self-entitled people (apparently it’s perfectly ok to expose others to their non-religious views) make horrible neighbors.


#6

I understand your frustration and outrage, but I WOULD not only wish any friends of mine who are avowed atheists a Merry Christmas, but I would use Christmas as an opportunity to evangelize them, recalling Mark 2:17 and Luke 5:32.

Peace!


#7

Awwww... The poor neighbors. Hopefully they will move to an isolated island where they will not be exposed to other human beings and their awful religions.
;)


#8

Same over here. But there are glimmers of hope. A couple of years ago, the Christmas market set up a nativity scene in our city center, and when the Virgin Mary vanished, surprisingly (for this city) there was condemnation from all quarters. The Virgin Mary was quickly found (in someone’s front garden) and returned very quickly.

Personally, I think that those who view it as a non-religious holiday have been robbed - usually end up drunk (because it is expected), bored, discontent with expensive presents etc etc. The wonder and beauty of the Day is down to the celebration, remembrance and hope of the birth of Jesus. I am such a Christmas person in heart and soul (but not in wasting money on expensive presents or other trappings) and I just love waking up to that wonderful feeling of hush, peace and expectancy.


#9

Their loss.


#10

Certainly for a long time. I do think though that non-Christians and atheists used to avoid even the trappings of Christmas. You wouldn’t go into a Hindu house and see a tree. Or find atheists with a Santa hat. Anyone might take advantage of good deals in stores, or an extra serving of eggnog, but they weren’t going to call that Christmas.

Now there are so many non-Christians celebrating that it has become the generic winter holiday of consumerism.


#11

Oh c’mon…Santa Claus as an elf that flies through the air in a sleigh pulled and powered by magic reindeer - including one with a glowing nose - delivering presents made at the North Pole by other elves to all the children in the world is related to the birth of Christ exactly how??? Add to that the Grinch, Elf on the Shelf (gack!), Frosty the Snowman, and God knows what else…and it’s clear (as in a Midnight Clear!) that Christmas has almost completely lost its religious bearings. How many even go to church on Christmas any more?

Sorry, the Santa myth et al., above, have killed the Christian message of Christmas…not any atheists, non-Christians, etc. Of course it’s a secular holiday for a huge number of people - especially Christians and retailers of all sorts who give the religious aspect lip service at most.

So, hang the mistletoe, cut and trim the tree, light the yule log, spike the nog, go into debt, read “A Visit from St. Nicholas” complete with reindeer names and magic, and complain that the left has declared war on Christmas. Yikes!!

It’s Christians who have done that it seems to me.


#12

No way it's only 50%, has to be much higher.


#13

[quote="Geist, post:12, topic:348939"]
No way it's only 50%, has to be much higher.

[/quote]

I was thinking it had to be much lower, since the vast majority of citizens identify as Christian. I didn't read the link because I'm on my phone, but I think it would depend heavily on how the questions were worded. If it requires religious participation, I could see it being around 50%. If it just requires acknowledging and celebrating the birth of Christ, I would think it higher than 50%.


#14

Interestingly enough, many of the attributes commonly assigned to the myth of Santa Clause come from the story of the warrior god Odin. I find the pagan influence on Christmas quite interesting… historically of course. Now obviously, the current understanding of “Santa Clause” is not the same person as the true St. Nicholas.

Oh… and the really ironic thing… Santa wasn’t fat until Coke made him fat (in a commercial)


#15

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