Christopher Columbus murals covered with Native American tapestries at Notre Dame University

The University of Notre Dame administration has now covered the school’s 12 murals depicting the life of Christopher Columbus, which generated protests and petitions from Native American groups on campus

The 12 tapestries showing Native American symbols and wildlife native to Indiana and are now placed directly over the Columbus murals. The Native American symbols belong to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi, who [invited](https://ndsmcobserver.com/2019/09/pokagon-tribe-members-reflect-

In some places, the edges of the original Columbus murals can still be seen. They were commissioned in 1884 by the founder of Notre Dame, Rev. Edward Sorin, and painted by Vatican artist Luigi Gregori. The murals depict Columbus as both a Catholic and American hero,history/) the religious congregation that founded Notre Dame to today’s campus.

Virtue signalling continues unobstructed by rational thought.

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The Cancel Culture is alive and well at Notre Dame.

I can see why they would do this.

About time. Good on Notre Dame.

Why? Have you seen the murals? They have Ind… Native Americans in (as I recall) three of the twelve. Is that alone sufficient to condemn the depictions? What’s going on here? They even covered over a mural of Queen Isabella, venerated by the church as a Servant of God, with a tapestry depicting a turtle and two rats.

Now, instead of murals commissioned in 1884 by the founder of Notre Dame, and painted by a Vatican artist, there are wall hangings showing local wildlife and Native American symbols…and completely irrelevant to pretty much everything.

Why is this a good thing?

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I can’t see why not have both, I’m familiar with the murals which are spectacular pieces of work. Yes, they’re a bit er, paternalistic shall we say but there’s tonnes of artwork floating around the UK on walls that still is and you will never be able to satisfy all comers by removing it all. I can understand the calls to remove some things, such as where people in one UK city wanted a particular statue gone as the bloke in question made the bulk of his fortune via slave trading and was unapologetically in favour of it but other figures are far more complex. I for example love Tolkien but I don’t love some of his remarks about Irish myth and legends and the way he viewed them as perhaps culturally inferior to British or Norse myth. Doesn’t mean I must run out and throw all books by the man away. By the same token Yeats in Irish literature had some very silly flirtations with Irish fascist groups towards the close of his life at times. He’d likely have outgrown that had he live a bit longer as he’d flirted with a dozens of political movements over the course of his life and never really commited deeply to any of them. I can use my own brain and decide for myself that, ‘Hey I don’t really agree with these gents on those issues’. If university students cannot handle some murals from another era like these (which in any case most of them will pay scant attention to really) then intellectual toughening up may be in order.

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