Chritianity and Septicism


#1

I know how to prove to an atheist that there is a god.
I know how to prove to a bible believing christian that the Catholic Church is the one true church.

How do I prove to a skeptical agnostic that the Christian God is the true God?


#2

[quote=MichaelC]I know how to prove to an atheist that there is a god.
I know how to prove to a bible believing christian that the Catholic Church is the one true church.

How do I prove to a skeptical agnostic that the Christian God is the true God?
[/quote]

You might want to post this in Ask an Apologist …


#3

[quote=MichaelC]I know how to prove to an atheist that there is a god.
I know how to prove to a bible believing christian that the Catholic Church is the one true church.

How do I prove to a skeptical agnostic that the Christian God is the true God?
[/quote]

Have you ever heard Pascal’s Wager, and it’s “refutation” of agnosticism?

The most powerful part of Pascal’s argument comes next. It is not his refutation of atheism as a foolish wager (that comes last) but his refutation of agnosticism as impossible. Agnosticism, not-knowing, maintaining a sceptical, uncommitted attitude, seems to be the most reasonable option. The agnostic says, “The right thing is not to wager at all.” Pascal replies, “But you must wager. There is no choice. You are already committed [embarked].” We are not outside observers of life, but participants. We are like ships that need to get home, sailing past a port that has signs on it proclaiming that it is our true home and our true happiness. The ships are our own lives and the signs on the port say “God”. The agnostic says he will neither put in at that port (believe) nor turn away from it (disbelieve) but stay anchored a reasonable distance away until the weather clears and he can see better whether this is the true port or a fake (for there are a lot of fakes around). Why is this attitude unreasonable, even impossible? Because we are moving. The ship of life is moving along the waters of time, and there comes a point of no return, when our fuel runs out, when it is too late. The Wager works because of the fact of death.

Realize, of course, that this will push him either to athiesm or theism if he accepts it. Ask yourself, are you worse off if he chooses athiesm, or not.

Pascal’s Wager, of course, is not a proof of God, but a reason to believe.


#4

[quote=MichaelC]I know how to prove to an atheist that there is a god.
I know how to prove to a bible believing christian that the Catholic Church is the one true church.

How do I prove to a skeptical agnostic that the Christian God is the true God?
[/quote]

Do I dare ask …how do you prove the R.C.church is the one true church?


#5

[quote=MichaelC]I know how to prove to an atheist that there is a god.
I know how to prove to a bible believing christian that the Catholic Church is the one true church.

How do I prove to a skeptical agnostic that the Christian God is the true God?
[/quote]

That’s not easy, but with some discussion and prayer, it’s certainly possible. Personally, I think it’s difficult, and I’m not that great at it. Actually I’ve had a discussion on nearly that exact topic with a former friend who actually used to be a member at my church, yet ended up a couple years ago becoming an atheist who claimed that even if God existed, then how could you ever know that it’s the Christian God. He considers Christianity as “one religion among many” that he currently can’t be sure any of them are true or false.

However, through some dialogue with someone, about the workings of their worldview/religion, you can pick out inconsistincies in their beliefs and how they live life and think.

Do I need to give an example? Without knowing more about your skeptic contact, it’s hard to know what type of example to give.

However, skepticism in itself typically isn’t very hard to refute.

If a person is a true skeptic, they will likely have certain foundational principles they believe. But in order to be a good skeptic, they have to question and be skeptical of even those foundational beliefs, other wise they’re just playing games with skepticism, toying with the idea that “you can’t ever know anything for sure.” Like, do they know for sure that they cannot ever know anything for sure? What kind of skeptic is sure of something?

Be sure you know what you ought to believe about the world, about God’s sovereignty over it and over our reasoning. Otherwise, likely you’ll end up being the “stumped” one. But if you’re suave with atheists, then you should be able to go the distance with a typical agnostic. So much is in the “inner critique” of what they believe. Answer the fool according to his folly, show him what’s wrong with the way he himself professes to believe, based upon what he believes, lest he be wise in his own eyes.

Bounce your conversations off us here on this thread, surely somebody can help out.


#6

[quote=MichaelC]I know how to prove to an atheist that there is a god.
I know how to prove to a bible believing christian that the Catholic Church is the one true church.

How do I prove to a skeptical agnostic that the Christian God is the true God?
[/quote]

Well, there is one God who is God, no matter what name you use to call on Him. But to prove that Christianity is correct. I would suggest the following pointers:

Christianity is the only religion whose God walked the earth at a specific historical time in a specific geographical location. The Creed says “sufferend under Pontius Pilate” because that fixes the date to within a few years.

C.S. Lewis talks about dividing religions, like soups, into “thick” (earthy) and “clear” (ascetic). The ancient fertility cults were thick, while world-denying religions like Buddhism are clear. To be complete, a religion needs to be both “thick” and “clear” at the same time, and after some searching Lewis concluded that Christianity and Hinduism were the only ones that filled the bill. With Hinduism, though, any individual Hindu could choose to be the one or the other, while the individual Christian is required to be both. We are to eat the flesh of our God and drink His Blood, like the “thick” religions would require, and we are to spend time in prayer and love our neighbors as a “clear” religion would require.

If the Catholic Church is the one true church, then how is the Christian God not the one true God?

Hope this helps.

  • Liberian

#7

Hey, good point!!

I think that Michael would have to distinguish between proving to a Bible believing Christian that the RCC is the one true church, and proving to a non-Bible believing agnostic that the Holy Trinity is the One True God. One believes in God already, the other “doesn’t” to use the term loosely.


#8

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