Church history recommended reading


#1

Hi folks…not sure if this is the forum for this but I have to ask for some recommendations on reading material. I am looking to read more about the Church’s history during the Middle Ages…post-Nicean, post-Empire stuff…basically from the fall of Rome through the ascent of Charlemagne and the establishement of Christiandom. I’ve tried to give Donald Logan’s “History of the Church in the Middle Ages” a go…but I found it not a very good read and too deferential to Islam. If anyone can steer me toward some better reading on the subject I’d be grateful. Thanks.:shrug:


#2

You might try Warren H. Carroll’s six volume History of Christiandom.
The second and third volumes cover the time between Constantine and the Reformation. Available from Amazon, they are moderately priced, but not cheap. I don’t think the sixth volume has been published yet, but am uncertain.Lots of footnotes can make for a tedious read, but I found that skipping many of them the first time through helped, but do go back and reread because they are packed with futher infomation.:slight_smile:


#3

“Triumph: The Power & the Glory of the Catholic Church” by H.W. Crocker III. At least, I believe that’s the title. He & Fr. C. John McCloskey ahve an early am program on EWTN about the history of the Church. I think it’s 6:00 AM on Tues.

Peace,
Linda


#4

I haven’t read it but I understand that British historian Paul Johnson’s “History Of Christianity” is commendable.

John


#5

Yes I’ve read the Crocker book it was fantastic, good suggestion…I’ve read the BokenKotter history too, and several books ont he early church, church fathers and the Ecumenical Councils. I’m really looking for something more specific about the church during the post empire period through the ascendancy of Charlemaigne


#6

You could try these two volumes from the New Catholic Encyclopedia:

The Early Middle Ages - Bernard Guillemain
The Dawn of the Middle Ages - Jean Remy Palanque

The Age of the Martyrs by Giuseppe Ricciotti is a work that focuses on an eariler era. 284 - 337 a.d.


#7

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