Civil Marriage, Now Divorced, Can One Remarry in Church?


#1

Although I did find other topics pertaining to marriage after divorce, my situation is a bit different and I would like to know if anyone can advise me or point me in the right direction.

My ex-husband is Episcopalian and I am Roman Catholic. He was previously married to another woman in the Roman Catholic Church. When we got engaged, he refused to get an annulment to his first wife. (His ex wife also refused to get the marriage annulled.)

We married in a civil ceremony and have subsequently divorced.

I have since met a man from whom I have known since childhood. We both grew up in the same faith and share common ground on how our faith is important in our lives - and have discussed marriage. We both would like to marry in Church, namely in one of our childhood churches - but I am not sure if I would be allowed to remarry.

Would the church consider my marriage invalid because my ex-husband never annulled his marriage? Or would that not be taken into consideration? Would I need an annulment? Thank you in advance…,


#2

You need to speak with your pastor. Even though your civil marriage is not likely to be considered valid, it still must be investigated. This is not a whole investigtion for validity but a paper process that confirms that a) you were Catholic at the time of your attempted marriage, b) that the civil marriage did not have a dispensation and c) that your spouse in the civil marriage was not free to marry at that time.

These processes are not nearly as lengthy as a full tribunal process. In some diocese, the work is delegated to the pastor. You will need some documents such as your baptismal certificate and the civil marriage certificate/license. Either your pastor or a staff person trained in marriage issues will help you through it.


#3

Yup. It’s actually a pretty simple, though tedious, process. But, in general, unless there’s something we aren’t seeing in the OP’s post, this is going to be a relatively easy declaration of nullity.


#4

Sounds right to me too.

Talk to your Parish Priest.


#5

Thank you for your replies! I will discuss it with my pastor. :slight_smile:


#6

AlwaysHis210,

How did the talk with your pastor go? Was the process a simple one or are you still going through the process? The only reason I ask is because I’m in the same boat. My ex-husband was Presbyterian who was previously married and did not obtain an annulment before our civil ceremony. I talked with my pastor but he seems to think I’ll still need to go through a formal annulment, though the lady I talked to at he tribunal office said that my circumstances did not require me to go through a formal process. Just trying to see how long this may take.

Thanks in Advance :confused:


#7

[quote="Tat2Chic, post:6, topic:297319"]
AlwaysHis210,

How did the talk with your pastor go? Was the process a simple one or are you still going through the process? The only reason I ask is because I'm in the same boat. My ex-husband was Presbyterian who was previously married and did not obtain an annulment before our civil ceremony. I talked with my pastor but he seems to think I'll still need to go through a formal annulment, though the lady I talked to at he tribunal office said that my circumstances did not require me to go through a formal process. Just trying to see how long this may take.

Thanks in Advance :confused:

[/quote]

It takes six weeks to 14 months for the usual Tribunal. The documentary process could be as short as six weeks.

Lack of canonical form requires a copy of the marriage certificate or the divorce decree, and the original copy of a recent (6 mos.) updated baptismal certificate for the Catholic party or parties. Those provide proof of being Catholic and proof of the lack of canonical form.


#8

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