Clergy to convene, discuss Catholic missal changes [CN-USA]

Catholic clergy and lay leaders from around the region will gather in Milwaukee Thursday for a two-day conference that will be, for some, their first in-depth look at the controversial changes ahead in the Catholic liturgy.

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I wouldn’t necessarily call these changes “controversial” because they simply bring us into conformity with the Latin original. That is why these changes were made in the first place and that is why the Venerable Pope John Paul II promulgated the authoritative document on liturgical translations, “Liturgiam Authenticam.” Now, the ones who are resistant to the change may deem such as “controversial”, but, the Church certainly does not see it that way.

Milwaukee does need to be commended, though, for taking the initiative to educate its clergy on the new translations and getting them into their priests’ hands. This is important. It is also important to note that the Archdiocese of St. Louis is devoting its November Gateway Liturgical Conference to the new translations.

:thumbsup:

I know! It is absolute nonsense when people try to say this is against VII, when it’s really making our Mass closer to the original Novus Ordo.
Warning: stupidity alert

[quote= whatifwejustsaidwait.org]It is now forty-five years since the Second Vatican Council promulgated the ground-breaking and liberating document on the sacred liturgy, Sacrosanctum Concilium. The conciliar document transcended ecclesiastical politics. It was not just the pet project of a party, but the overwhelming consensus of the bishops of the world. Its adoption passed overwhelmingly: 2,147 to 4. In our wildest dreams could we ever have imagined that we would live to witness what seems more and more like the systematic dismantling of the great vision of the Council’s decree? But we have.
[/quote]

See how they set themselves up as defenders of Vatican II?! :mad:

It sounds more like the group is defending the Spirit of Vatican II than what the documents actually state.

They seem to be more concern with money than with the Truth.

who are these people?

everyone wants to put their two cents in teh Church. what the Church really wants is obedience and not their opinions.

:thumbsup:

The conference in question was one of the 21 USCCB conferences scheduled for around the country. MIlwaukee was just one of the sites. I just came back from one in NJ. Same presenter. I was a great presentation. There were priests and diocesan leadership from a number of states there.

We are seriously thinking of going to the one in San Antonio; however, a priest friend of mine thinks that he can probably learn more on his own reading the translations. He’s been looking forward to these translations for a long time, as have I.

If something elicits controversy, it’s fair to call it controversial. Whether that controversy is justified is irrelevant to the accuracy of the term.

I would be willing to bet cash that there will still be some kind of controversy.

Probably something in the translation, just one sentence or tiny phrase or even a few words or just ONE word (probably concerning roles of women in the Church, or perhaps concerning some theological dogma of the Church) will create some kind of uproar among some very small group of Catholics, and the secular media will pick up on this and distort it to the sky, and the general population of Catholics will read the secular media reports and get all worried and upset and in some cases, angry, and depending on what diocese they live in, their bishop will either alleviate their fears with clear, concise information, or he will ignore them entirely and say nothing which will just fan the flames of the controversy and cause it to spread across the United States and into CAF, and Cat will collect cash for winning the bet.

The translations was only part of the presentation. There was one session on how to implement it, dealing with negative attitudes and problems that might occur, a timeline that would work best and what resources are available. There was a presentation on the chants of the Mass, complete with participation of all in chanting. There was an excellent presentation on those parts of the translation that people have been anticipating problems with. There was a presentation on the complete history of the revision, the whys and what fors. Then there was a really excellent presentation on the art of celebration. The question and answer portions were good and only one person expressed very negative feeling toward it all. In one way him getting up was good because it ended up he was from our diocese but none of us present knew him and the presenter wondered how he got in since he was not a priest, deacon, or a member of diocesan leadership. We got his name and found out he is going around our diocese giving classes on the Missal. Not a good person to be doing this given his attitude. Now we know we’ll have to do something about him, maybe warn parishes or something.

There will be some forment, if for no other reason than that people get in a rut and don’t want to be dragged out of that rut.

We all get used to one format, and are mostly comfortable with it. Then, along comes a new format, and we get uncomfortable.

It is likely that a few will use this as their excuse to leave the church. Just as a few leave the church over every issue, from one side of it or the other.

And a few will use this as their latest excuse to stir everyone up and make things as difficult as possible for everyone.

You’re right. Many feel the same way. That’s human nature for you. We all have a certain comfort zone. But a little discipline is needed once in a while to get us back on track. In my opinion, the language will be less banal and conversational and more special and worshipping. While a few will no doubt leave, it is hoped more Prodical Sons come back into the fold.

And we know you won’t take part in that controversy, cat. :rotfl:

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