Climate Change: Sociology professor draws Limbaugh’s ire


#1

It’s Good Friday, and I come across ways in which we continue to crucify Jesus. I can’t imagine anyone on CAF would be engaging in harassment of and death threats against climate scientists and academics studying various angles of climate science and people’s responses to it.

See: registerguard.com/web/newslocalnews/27862556-41/norgaard-climate-mann-professor-bloggers.html.csp

But perhaps there are other ways we may be contributing to this from some rash speech (the finger points back at me, too). I would also hope that posters (including me) would use prudence in their rhetoric about climate scientists and environmentalists. While I am sure there are some bad and evil persons in all walks of life, it seems wrong to slander people right and left with no more evidence of wrong-doing than “viral web rumor wisdom.”

If a scientist has been tried and convicted in court for wrong-doing re his/her science, then, of course, one could talk about how wrong that wrong doing was. I think we have to be careful and not use inflamatory language that may lead some unbalanced persons (not necessarily CAF members) to engage in harassment of scientists and sending death threats against them, their families – for instance against a 6-year old daughter. It’s also possible some unbalanced persons may carry out those death threats.

((BTW, I’m an environmentalist, but I am not a neo-pagan, pantheist, atheist, communist, totalitarian-supporter, world-take-over supporter, people-hater, baby-killer, abortionist, or any of the other evil epithets lobbed here on CAF against environmentalists.))

I know from my education and research that there are serious environmental problems that harm and kill people. Others may have different opinions. I think we should strive to be Christian in all that we say and do – more ready to suffer insult than to lob insult or worse. (And that applies to me too :).)

Blessed Easter to all!


#2

You might say that all Christians are environmentalists. In the Garden of Eden, God freely and generously gave stewardship of all the earth to Adam and Eve and their posterity. At the last judgement each of us will be called to account for how well we cared this gift.

In my opinion, non-Christian environmentalists have a totally different view of the "cosmos" and the place of humankind within it. This profound difference in understanding leads to the contention between both groups.

Can we find common ground (no pun intended)? I say "no" unless we acknowledge our fundamental differences.


#3

[quote="JoanREDirector, post:2, topic:279770"]
You might say that all Christians are environmentalists. In the Garden of Eden, God freely and generously gave stewardship of all the earth to Adam and Eve and their posterity. At the last judgement each of us will be called to account for how well we cared this gift.

In my opinion, non-Christian environmentalists have a totally different view of the "cosmos" and the place of humankind within it. This profound difference in understanding leads to the contention between both groups.

Can we find common ground (no pun intended)? I say "no" unless we acknowledge our fundamental differences.

[/quote]

Thanks for your post.

I sometimes become demoralized by the anti-environmentalism out there. At the very least we can engage in civil (Christian) discourse, without falling into ad hominem attacks.

It seems to me one of the issues is sort of outside Christianity -- and that is the very high, luxurous, and wasteful lifestyle we Westerners find ourselves in that makes King Herod look like a pauper by comparison. I think even without enviornmental problems, that alone makes me a bit uneasy. "It is harder for a rich person to enter heaven....." But this lifestyle has crept up on us over many decades & a century or so, and we were born into it, so we think we're poor if we don't have a car or TV or iphone, etc.

Of course, God gave this world for our material support, and mainly for the purpose of ushering in His Kingdom. But I think there is this tendency to take advantage of that, sort of the way unscrupulous employees might go on expensive junkets not necessary for their work and way above and beyond even the restful and refreshing recreation and vacation that they need to do a better job. I confess I'm also guilty of those types of justifications.

I suppose if we were to take an honest look and strive to live moderately as model Christians, and also cut out the waste, and using safer alteratives (for our own and the world's health), the environmental problems probably wouldn't be so severe.

But the biggest block would be an honest assessment, all the time realizing that Jesus loves us very much and is all-forgiving.


#4

I basically agree with you-----

One “quibble,” though-----
Whar exactly DID Ms. Norgaard mean by the words “and treatment?” I’m sorry, but that is ambiguous enough to be considered open to a variety of interpretations.

Sorry, but that is a legitimate question.


#5

blog post, not a news article

Please do not post about what a talk show host says, they get paid for being controversial and it is seldom real news.

Please see the forum rules posted at the top of the forum for more information.


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