Comments on the Liturgy of the Hours

"Next to the Eucharist itself, it is the Liturgy of the Hours which provides the most efficacious means for achieving both the glorification of God and the sanctification of men."

Dominic F. Scotto, TOR
Lord, Teach Us How to Pray. pp. 7-8
Society of St. Paul / Alba House

Comments? Agree? Disagree?

If you agree, why do you think more people aren't praying the Divine Office?

[quote="tinalewis, post:1, topic:186188"]
"Next to the Eucharist itself, it is the Liturgy of the Hours which provides the most efficacious means for achieving both the glorification of God and the sanctification of men."

Dominic F. Scotto, TOR
Lord, Teach Us How to Pray. pp. 7-8
Society of St. Paul / Alba House

Comments? Agree? Disagree?

If you agree, why do you think more people aren't praying the Divine Office?

[/quote]

I know it's the most important prayer of the Church after the Mass but as a layman who has prayed the Liturgy of the Hours for a while now, I'm not sure if I'd agree that it's the most efficacious means for the average layman. Maybe he's correct but to be honest, I wonder if for the average person with limited time and means, the Rosary could actually be a more efficent means of prayer.

That said, I think* Shorter Christian Prayer *(the smaller 1-volume version of the LOTH) is a really excellent way of prayer and I wish a lot more people were encouraged to take it up without being made to feel they're doing LOTH-light. It's about the size of an average prayerbook and Morning and Evening Prayer take up only a little more time than the average set of morning and night prayers from a typical book of prayers. The 4 week cycle of psalms give it a variety you don't get from reciting the same prayers every morning or night. I think that for the average layperson it's enough, even if they only do one Hour each day, unless they feel called to pray more of the LOTH.

If you agree, why do you think more people aren't praying the Divine Office?/

I think there are lot's of reasons. It hasn't been prayed in the average parish for years, years, and years so the average person isn't exposed to it.The structure can be confusing. The books can sometimes be difficult to find. You can't memorize it like you can the responses at Mass and you can't cary it in your pocket like you can a Rosary. The full 4 volumes can be expensive for the average person and the books as we have them aren't really set up for use in a parish.

The Rosary started as a layman's substitute for the Divine Office. In fact, it was often called "the poor man's breviary."

In the original form, there were 150 Aves, corresponding to the 150 Psalms.

I remember reading somewhere that in Carthusian monasteries when the monks would gather to pray the Divine Office the lay brothers (who might be illiterate) would pray the rosary.

[quote="Tepeyac, post:2, topic:186188"]
. . .
That said, I think* Shorter Christian Prayer *(the smaller 1-volume version of the LOTH) is a really excellent way of prayer and I wish a lot more people were encouraged to take it up without being made to feel they're doing LOTH-light. It's about the size of an average prayerbook and Morning and Evening Prayer take up only a little more time than the average set of morning and night prayers from a typical book of prayers. The 4 week cycle of psalms give it a variety you don't get from reciting the same prayers every morning or night. I think that for the average layperson it's enough, even if they only do one Hour each day, unless they feel called to pray more of the LOTH.

. .. .

[/quote]

I agree. I used it for several years. Finally went to Christian Prayer to get all the Lent and Advent days. However, often take the Shorter Christian Prayer when traveling.

I think I’d agree. There’s nothing potentially untrue about that statement. I also second what some of the other posters have said: if you’re for any reason overwhelmed by the LOTH (timewise, or you can’t get the books, or can’t understand it, etc.) then *definitely *pick up Shorter Christian Prayer.

[quote="tinalewis, post:1, topic:186188"]
"Next to the Eucharist itself, it is the Liturgy of the Hours which provides the most efficacious means for achieving both the glorification of God and the sanctification of men."

Dominic F. Scotto, TOR
Lord, Teach Us How to Pray. pp. 7-8
Society of St. Paul / Alba House

Comments? Agree? Disagree?

[/quote]

I think the only disagreement I might suggest would be to substitute the Sacraments *(which are not always celebrated in the context of the Eucharist) for *the Eucharist itself. :twocents:

On the other hand, the LOTH can certainly be more frequently accessed than most of the Sacraments. :shrug:

[quote="tinalewis, post:1, topic:186188"]
If you agree, why do you think more people aren't praying the Divine Office?

[/quote]

:twocents: In company with so many treasures of the Church -- Poor catechesis. How many of your average Catholics in the pew have ever heard of the LOTH, let alone know that it is not something reserved to clergy and religious? :shrug:

tee

I will testify to this. I have had to raise my hand on a few occasions during RCIA classes on prayer and liturgy to remind the teacher and the class that the LOTH is not something that only the clergy do.

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