Common Sense Advice - Refridgerator


#1

Dear CAF members,

I am in need of some common sense advice with a Catholic perspective. If anyone with life experience could help me, that would be wonderful.

My situation is summarized below:

The refrigerator broke down on the 8th of this month (16 days ago).
Neighbor has been letting me use their fridge.
Have Sears insurance that covers up to $500 repairs.
Insurance cost me $210, which is a lot for me but I am not handy at repairs.
The repairman came by three times, but fridge is still broken.
The cost of labor and parts for the three times is around $700.
Repairman said that everything is still covered, so I am taking his word on it.
My kind neighbor is pushing me to complain about the delay in repair and the fact that the repairs are not effective.
I want to do what’s right for my family who is having meals affected by this, the neighbor, and for the company who is diligently sending the repairman but still has not fixed the appliance.

I am still patient on this and would not have asked if my neighbors have not encouraged me to complain. I am concern because I want to be patient and kind, while not failing on my duties for my family. We are eating regularly but losing time during the day because we need to be here for the repairs. Additional, the quality of food has been affected which is something I offer up to the Lord.

The repairman will return once this latest part arrives. He feels confident that he will be able to fix it this time. The part would probably arrive this week and he may be able to come on Saturday or we would need to wait till next week.

My question is what would you do to fulfill you family obligations as well as being charitable as possible to the repairman and the Sears?


#2

Dear Wondering,
You are a great person. But perhaps a little too unassertive.
Sears has a responsibility to provide you with a working refrigerator. 3 times coming out to fix it is not acceptable.
I would call and inform Sears politely that you want to be notified as soon as the part arrives, and you expect the repairman to be at your house on Saturday (assuming it has arrived.) If not, you expect to have part of the bill recompensed since you would have to stay home for his visit.
Tell them that if it's not fixed this time, you expect a new refrigerator delivered that week.
Take a look at your warranty and insurance information to be sure exactly what your rights are, but you will find that being assertive enables you to ask for more on many occasions.
For Pete's sake, you need a working refrigerator! A little indignation wouldn't hurt;

Your first responsiblity is to your family, your second to your neighbor whose routine is being hampered, and certainly your third to be courteous to the repairman. But being courteous doesn't mean you let them walk all over you.
Easier said than done, I know. God bless.


#3

If it was me, I’d grumble to anyone who stood still long enough to listen, and say absolutely nothing to anyone at the company.

BUT, what I would like to say you should do is this: complain, but in an appropriate way. A well-worded complaint will accurately describe the problem, without resorting to bitterness or insults, and it might help. It’s possible that they will increase their efforts to fix your problem. It might also give them information that will help to improve their service to their customers afterwards. I do think that most companies, especially the big ones, want to know how they are doing, in a constructive way.


#4

I can totally understand your frustration with the repair taking so long and with Sears. BUT, I think that you are asking a lot of your neighbor for so many days. I think it is time to shop daily for your food, put your milk in a cooler and let your neighbor have their life back. :rolleyes: They have been more than kind and you shouldn't abuse that kindness.

Now Sears...I would have been phoning in the complaint right after the second visit, but that's just me. :shrug:


#5

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