communion rules


#1

At the Corpus Christi Mass in Italy with Pope Beneddict presiding this past weekend Most of the Bishops and priests receiving communion dipped the body of Christ in the many Chalices of wine (Blood) and then placed the host in their mouth. This was just not the Bishops and priest at the Altar but those in what appeared to be in the audience.
I was under the impression that this was a no no. Changing the consistency, size, shape, texture of the host in this matter. Also this may create some of the body or blood to be dropped during the transfer to the mouth.


#2

[quote=c659smith]At the Corpus Christi Mass in Italy with Pope Beneddict presiding this past weekend Most of the Bishops and priests receiving communion dipped the body of Christ in the many Chalices of wine (Blood) and then placed the host in their mouth. This was just not the Bishops and priest at the Altar but those in what appeared to be in the audience.
I was under the impression that this was a no no. Changing the consistency, size, shape, texture of the host in this matter. Also this may create some of the body or blood to be dropped during the transfer to the mouth.
[/quote]

No, it is not a no no. The USCCB may not agree with it(I don’t know if they have said anything), but the Vatican has not said anything negative about it that I know of. The Eastern Catholic Churches do it.


#3

[104.] The communicant must not be permitted to intinct the host himself in the chalice, nor to receive the intincted host in the hand. As for the host to be used for the intinction, it should be made of valid matter, also consecrated; it is altogether forbidden to use non-consecrated bread or other matter.

This I believe to be the rule unless possibly at the altar and leaning into the chalice such as the Priests or Bishops conducting the Mass.

As you can tell I am really perplexed by this and everyone there intinctioned their own hosts.


#4

[quote=c659smith][104.] The communicant must not be permitted to intinct the host himself in the chalice, nor to receive the intincted host in the hand. As for the host to be used for the intinction, it should be made of valid matter, also consecrated; it is altogether forbidden to use non-consecrated bread or other matter.

This I believe to be the rule unless possibly at the altar and leaning into the chalice such as the Priests or Bishops conducting the Mass.

As you can tell I am really perplexed by this and everyone there intinctioned their own hosts.
[/quote]

Its not denying intinction as valid or even good. All it is saying is that the oreist should dip the Body into the Blood and place it on the tongue. It can not be recieved in the hand and the communicant can not dip the Body in the Blood himself.

It clearly allows for intinction when it specifies the matter of the intincted host.


#5

in the tradition, the altar boy places a gold tray under your chin in case anything falls. yes i think only the priest or minister should do tincture. i have been in masses where i was allowed to drink from the chalice (se?). the priest then wipes off the rim of the chalice. one time i was told to finish it. lot of alcohol!


#6

Yes and I agree with that matter now but in researching would not the hundreds of Bishops and Priest then be communicants and should not be allowed to intinct their own host at the communion line


#7

it is permitted to intinct the Host in the Precious Blood but only the celebrant and the co-celebrant is allowed to inticnt the Host themselves. Anyone even cardinals who are not co-celebrant of the mass is not allowed to intinct the Host themselves.

The Host that is dipped in the Precious Blood should never be recieved in the hands. it must be recieved in the tongue.


#8

[quote=c659smith]At the Corpus Christi Mass in Italy with Pope Beneddict presiding this past weekend Most of the Bishops and priests receiving communion dipped the body of Christ in the many Chalices of wine (Blood) and then placed the host in their mouth. This was just not the Bishops and priest at the Altar but those in what appeared to be in the audience.
I was under the impression that this was a no no. Changing the consistency, size, shape, texture of the host in this matter. Also this may create some of the body or blood to be dropped during the transfer to the mouth.
[/quote]

It is a no no. However if priests or bishps or Cardinals, then they have consecrated hands and could touch the host and THEY could even receive communion in the hand. Laity, well they should only seek to receieve communion on the tongue.


#9

[quote=c659smith]At the Corpus Christi Mass in Italy with Pope Beneddict presiding this past weekend Most of the Bishops and priests receiving communion dipped the body of Christ in the many Chalices of wine (Blood) and then placed the host in their mouth. This was just not the Bishops and priest at the Altar but those in what appeared to be in the audience.
I was under the impression that this was a no no. Changing the consistency, size, shape, texture of the host in this matter. Also this may create some of the body or blood to be dropped during the transfer to the mouth.
[/quote]

Not actually seeing this myself. I would assume that they did this at the altar, over the corporal and were con-celebrants. A priest does not need to be in the sanctuary to be a con-celebrant. In several Pontifical Masses I have been at there were a hundred or more con-celebrants sitting in the section just below the sanctuary. In Mass with a large number of Faithful. Only the Blessed Sacrament under the form of bread is distributed to the faithful. However all priests celebrating the Mass must receive under both forms even if no one else does.


#10

Intinction is invalid if you are not ordained as a priest. Priests may self-communicate however…that is why they can intinct the host. No one else may though even though you may see some people attempt this to avoid the “germs” from sharing the cup.
The Catholic almanac also mentions that Intinction: A method of administering Holy Communion under the dual appearances of bread and wine, in which the consecrated host is dipped in the consecrated wine before being given to the communicant. The administering of Holy Communion in this manner, which has been traditional in Eastern‑Rite liturgies, was authorized in the Roman Rite for various occasions by the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy promulgated by the Second Vatican Council.


#11

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