Communion while kneeling and tripping?


#1

I fairly recently switched from a more traditional parish to a more modern one, partly because of scheduling issues, partly because there were more learning and service opportunities for me at the latter. But I noticed that I’m now the only one who kneels to receive communion. I’ve had some comments about “making sure people don’t trip”, although I asked outright and was told to go ahead (I serve as an EMHC and wanted to ask before doing something different while up front).

I was curious if anyone had seen this issue arise?


#2

It was one of the arguments regularly brought forth to discourage kneeling because the people behind them would trip. The other anti kneeling argument was that it an excessive act of piety.


#3

I saw someone kneel to receive at my parish once and thought it was really nice. In a way,too, it reminded me of my childhood at the altar rail.

I guess you just need a quick glance behind as you go down to let the person behind you know, as sometimes people stand too close.


#4

I started kneeling to receive Communion almost two years ago, and I have never had anyone trip on me. :o I usually leave a good 3-4 feet between me and the priest (or EMHC) and then I kneel.

It was kind of funny because one morning at Mass, my 3 year old sister was about to go up for a blessing, so she put her arms across her chest and knelt down in front of the priest! It was the only time she did it, but its funny how kids will sometimes follow your example. :rolleyes:


#5

How long do you think it would take to preform Mass if everyone would kneel when receive Communion? It would not be practical.


#6

So? Then they’d have to restore the communion rails. :smiley:


#7

Which, to add, is a pretty efficient means of distributing communion.


#8

I’ve never had a problem with someone kneeling in front of me. When someone receives while kneeling, they tend to step forward toward the priest, then kneel down. That gives them enough room.

I have almost been tripped by someone genuflecting. I grabbed the pew next to me and the person behind me, grabbed me. Otherwise I would have ended up on the floor.

This was because the person genuflecting, went down while in line. So her foot went back between my legs. She never noticed. :rolleyes:


#9

And figure out a way to add them to the churches that have been built without them.


#10

We have a number of people in our modern parish who kneel.

Usually they wait until the very end of the line. That way, no one is behind them to trip. :slight_smile:


#11

If it’s allowed and you choose to kneel before Communion, go for it. Just watch out for others. Mistakes happen :wink: If you choose to not kneel, be on the look out for those kneeling in front of you :slight_smile: Either way is fine. :thumbsup:


#12

If you are an EMHC at every Mass, there shouldn’t be anyone behind you to trip. :shrug: At my parish the EMHCs go up the the foot of the altar during the Anges Dei and kneel by the altar boys. We usually do stand to receive, but the altar boys don’t, so it would be very easy for an EMHC to just stay kneeling for communion and then stand to receive the ciboria.

If people don’t commonly kneel when receiving in the communion procession, than placing yourself toward te end (or very beginning!) of the procession is a good idea. Also, just be mindful of the person behind you.


#13

In my parish, maybe an extra 5 minutes and that would just be because some of us elders need time to get back up. If we had a rail, it would probably be faster than it is now. We have a few who do now and there is no noticeable difference in the flow of the lines.


#14

I recall when our parish first went to a posture of standing rather than kneeling for communion. At daily Mass, communicants had been kneeling at the altar rail to receive communion, and it went pretty fast, as the priest and EMHC made his way up and down the altar rail. After the change, we stood at the altar rail to receive communion, which seemed a little odd at first, but it still went pretty fast. The change made no practical difference, at least at daily Mass. At Sunday Mass, we have a communion line rather than standing at the altar rail.


#15

They have a communion rail at my parish, and it’s how everyone goes up to receive holy communion.


#16

At our beautiful Church in downtown San Francisco – St. Patrick’s – there’s one fellow who attends Mass every time I’m there and he kneels and receives on the tongue – he’s the only person who does that, and it brings back memories of altar rails and everyone kneeling and receiving on the tongue. I’m not sure I like the other way best but it’s been a long time since receiving Communion changed and I usually accept these things without question.


#17

Ours was ripped out as part of the “reforms of VII.” (quotes intended) It would be architecturally possible to add one, and I’m praying for that…


#18

That one is easy, our parish has lines of prei-dieu

When our parish was built in the 80’s, it was built without communion rails, but our pastor added them in using several prei-dieu. He was even able to get them from other parishes that had quit using them.

Here is a picture from my daughter’s First Holy Communion to show you what I mean

forums.catholic.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=10219&d=1302632187


#19

Oh, by all means, we want to be efficient; much better that we rush receiving Communion. Why, we could probably cut off 5 to 7 minutes or more of Mass! Think of how much faster it would be if Father could rip down the line of communicants, popping that host on the tongue while saying rapidly “BodyofChrist!” BodyofChrist!" “BodyofChrist”.

Yep. Gotta have that efficiency. :This “holier than thou” lollygagging around has to stop. I mean, what do these folks think, this is participation in the Last
Supper or something? :frowning:


#20

I’ve not seen prei-dieu used that way before; what a briliant and cost effective way to make communion while kneeling accessible. Thanks so much for the photo link.
jt


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