Communion wine

Is there a particular kind of wine that must be used for communion? Or can it be any kind?
** Thanks,**
** ~ Kathy ~**

[quote=Katie1723]Is there a particular kind of wine that must be used for communion? Or can it be any kind?
Thanks,
~ Kathy ~
[/quote]

…The wine must be natural wine of the grape and not corrupt
http://img.shopping.com/images1/di/61/65/54/33/71/6e7a5056497176746b68394b66424f6367-100x100.jpg

actually I was wondering about the brand…cheap stuff or good?? Certainly not “Boone’s Farm” !
~ Kathy ~

…i am not aware of a specific name… i do know that there is more than one winery that supplies the altar wine… it’s usually up to the diocese to provide for the parishes in that diocese… but, i am not totally sure so, let me just back off with the official catholic disclaimer…“i dun no”…

…sorry… let me check it out…

Peace:)

I did a search once and you can easily find places on the Internet that sell wine suitable for Communion. It seems there is some variety in the wines that can be used, and I know they taste different at different churches.

I belive it must be decent and pure quality wine (with the exception of a little yeast to ferment it), And must be between 12-18% alcohol on its own, not “fortified”. But i could be wrong.

The elements of a valid Catholic Eucharist are very specific. Searching the internet for “altar wine” will not produce a valid list for use in Catholic liturgy. The wine must be made a certain way and must be certified.

Check out this website for communion wine informations:

newadvent.org/cathen/01358a.htm

matt

[quote=Katie1723]actually I was wondering about the brand…cheap stuff or good?? Certainly not “Boone’s Farm” !
~ Kathy ~
[/quote]

Cost is not a factor, but some wines, including some inexpensive wines, are fortified by the addition of alcohol not produced by the fermentation of the wine, and/or are made from a blend of other fruits in addition to grapes. Such wines would not be valid matter.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]The elements of a valid Catholic Eucharist are very specific. Searching the internet for “altar wine” will not produce a valid list for use in Catholic liturgy. The wine must be made a certain way and must be certified.
[/quote]

That’s simply not true. First, it must be wine made from grapes (no saki or dandelion wine, etc.) It cannot have additives (like added nitrates or stabilizers) nor can it be fortified (like port or champagne.) Finally if cannot be processed in a way that would render it no longer as wine (pastuerization.)

It must not be “certified.”

One of the most popular sacramental wines in California is the Charles Shaw variety from Trader Joe’s. “Two Buck Chuck” (it’s $2.00 per bottle) meets all the requirements and it tastes like a $15-20.00 bottle of wine from only a few years ago…

I read the article. It does not mention whether the wine can be red or white wine. The parish I am currently in uses white. Is that valid?

PF

[quote=WanderAimlessly]I read the article. It does not mention whether the wine can be red or white wine. The parish I am currently in uses white. Is that valid?

PF
[/quote]

Both red and white wines are acceptable. And Pariah Pirana is correct – there is no “certification” for altar wine. Most California table wines meet the requirements.

Deacon Ed

[quote=Pariah Pirana]That’s simply not true. First, it must be wine made from grapes (no saki or dandelion wine, etc.) It cannot have additives (like added nitrates or stabilizers) nor can it be fortified (like port or champagne.) Finally if cannot be processed in a way that would render it no longer as wine (pastuerization.)

It must not be “certified.”

One of the most popular sacramental wines in California is the Charles Shaw variety from Trader Joe’s. “Two Buck Chuck” (it’s $2.00 per bottle) meets all the requirements and it tastes like a $15-20.00 bottle of wine from only a few years ago…
[/quote]

I will double-check that. I understood that you could NOT just go down to the local grocery store and buy Sundays Mass wine. I have also seen adds which state “certified to meet canonical requirements”.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]I will double-check that. I understood that you could NOT just go down to the local grocery store and buy Sundays Mass wine. I have also seen adds which state “certified to meet canonical requirements”.
[/quote]

“Double-check” all you want. You “understood” wrong.

[quote=WanderAimlessly]I read the article. It does not mention whether the wine can be red or white wine. The parish I am currently in uses white. Is that valid?

PF
[/quote]

It can even be “rose” or “blush” wine…

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]…I have also seen adds which state “certified to meet canonical requirements”.
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It is certainly possible for vintners to advertise with such a notice to encourage sales, and there is nothing wrong with their doing so as long as their claims are true. But wines without such a notice may be just as valid.

If the wine has turned to vinegar, is it still valid matter? because i remember once when i took the precoius blood, that the accidnets were so foul i had to remember rather forcibly that it was christ and i should not try to dispose of the sip i had taken (hankerchif or somthing, it was pretty bad), so i reverently swalloed and offered it up.

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