Communion without Confession


#1

I belong to a what I would consider a very large parish. I have always been amazed how few people stay in the pews during communion. I'm trying not to pass judgement but it's hard, especially with such limited confession times. :confused:


#2

Unfortunately, in today's world, many people receive the Eucharist in a state of mortal sin. They just don't care. No one in my parish stays in their pew during the distribution. A few unrepentant heretics receive. A few who never attend Mass receive. The list goes on and on.

So, in short, unless everyone in your parish never commits a mortal sin, there are probably many people who receive the Eucharist in a state of mortal sin. :(


#3

[quote="jerryinbaok, post:1, topic:344767"]
I belong to a what I would consider a very large parish. I have always been amazed how few people stay in the pews during communion. I'm trying not to pass judgement but it's hard, especially with such limited confession times. :confused:

[/quote]

Perhaps you should charitably assume that they all go to confession at a church that offers more frequent opportunity.


#4

[quote="babochka, post:3, topic:344767"]
Perhaps you should charitably assume that they all go to confession at a church that offers more frequent opportunity.

[/quote]

that would require me to assume the other church's in the diocese have more than adequate confession time available. based on times listed on the dioceses website I think I'm going to have to be even more charitable than original anticipated.


#5

I’m more inclined to think they just don’t know. People are poorly catechized, and there are a lot of Catholics who seem to be only going through the motions, maybe because it is what their family expects of them. I also hear many dissenting points of view concerning the nature of sin, even from some with authority within the Church, which leads to confusion.

My policy is to give my fellow parishioners the benefit of the doubt. I really do not think that very many people truly intend sacrilege, but the bottom line for me is, only the individual and God knows for sure.


#6

well, maybe all is not lost. I just read an article where the Church has seen a noticeable increase in the number of Catholics making confessions. I guess it started in Europe and South America. I’d link but I cant remember if links are allowed or not. If interested a solid google of “Confession boom attributed to Pope Francis effect” should get you there.


#7

While it might be true that many people receiving the Eucharist shouldn’t be doing so, I can’t see myself ever being concerned about it. I’m to busy trying to pluck that never ending supply of splinters/sawdust from my eye to be worrying about other people’s logs/planks.

:shrug:


#8

Our priest started preaching about the necessity of Confession and increased the times available, and now it seems more people are coming to Confession :slight_smile:

Also, I think some people may make appointments to confess. I had a friend who did that for a while because then she got some needed basic spiritual direction and it was very helpful to her.


#9

I agree with what you said and try to live this as well. However, I’m also torn by James 5:20 where we are told that God truly admires those who can bring a sinner back to Him. How should we reconcile this passage in James with Jesus’ own directives (ie: the speck and the log which you refer to, and for those without sin to cast the first stone)?


#10

And you know this how?! :eek:

It amazes me that, as someone, who in his profile states that he is not yet Catholic, you have such a horrible view of the people in your parish.

Maybe it’s time for a little reflection on this passage from Luke’s gospel~

Jesus addressed this parable
to those who were convinced of their own righteousness
and despised everyone else.
“Two people went up to the temple area to pray;
one was a Pharisee and the other was a tax collector.
The Pharisee took up his position and spoke this prayer to himself,
'O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity –
greedy, dishonest, adulterous – or even like this tax collector.
I fast twice a week, and I pay tithes on my whole income.’
But the tax collector stood off at a distance
and would not even raise his eyes to heaven
but beat his breast and prayed,
'O God, be merciful to me a sinner.'
I tell you, the latter went home justified, not the former;
for whoever exalts himself will be humbled,
and the one who humbles himself will be exalted.”


#11

Likewise.
And we can assume that most of these people do NOT have mortal sins on their souls.
We should presume the best I think.


#12

I know there are people who don’t agree with Church teaching, and still receive. I know there are people who never go to Mass, and the one time they attend in about a year, they receive. “How do I know this” you ask? Because they have told me. I still pray for them to change their ways.

Did I say that I have a horrible view of the people in my parish? No, I did not. To the contrary, I love the people in my parish. They are very nice, and some are very holy.

It’s true, some people just don’t care, and I have a few friends that don’t, but a lot probably are poorly-catechized and aren’t aware that you cannot receive the Eucharist in a state of mortal sin. (At least that is the charitable way to think).

I’m sure we can all agree that there are more people receiving the Eucharist in a state of mortal sin today than there were about 50-60 years ago. Why? Because barely anyone received the Eucharist back then. There was this common thought that you shouldn’t even receive the Eucharist in a state of venial sin. This view has since changed.


#13

Sorry, he’s 100% right.

I know how often I need confession. Given how few people there are at scheduled confessions, the only reasonable conclusion is that the majority of Mass attendees are receiving in the state of mortal sin.

Not to mention what we know from surveys as to how few Catholics attend Mass each week, how few believe in the real presence, how few believe artificial contraception and masturbation are mortal sins, etc.

I don’t judge any particular person. But, the law of averages says this must be true.

God Bless


#14

[quote="bilop, post:13, topic:344767"]
Sorry, he's 100% right.

I know how often I need confession. Given how few people there are at scheduled confessions, the only reasonable conclusion is that the majority of Mass attendees are receiving in the state of mortal sin.

Not to mention what we know from surveys as to how few Catholics attend Mass each week, how few believe in the real presence, how few believe artificial contraception and masturbation are mortal sins, etc.

I don't judge any particular person. But, the law of averages says this must be true.

God Bless

[/quote]

Of course, the charitable thing to do is to assume that they go to confession at another parish, even though I go to a rural parish, and there is no other parish within miles of it.

Again, the charitable thing, like I mentioned above, is to assume they are poorly-catechized and do not intend to commit sacrilege.


#15

:thumbsup: Yup! Too busy plucking weeds from my own garden to busy myself with the neighbor’s garden.

Charitably, you might suggest the sacrament of Reconciliation a with your pastor as a great topic for an Advent or Lenten study for your parish. Many Catholics have not learned or do not remember that it is Jesus who waits in the confessional to welcome them with open arms and lovingly forgive their sins.


#16

Sure, be charitable to the individual, but don’t ignore the reality.

We need real, frank catechesis. From the pulpit, and from our bishops.

If you miss Mass w/o good reason, you need to confess before receiving. If you fornicate, or masturbate, or view porn, or use contraception, or blaspheme, you need to confess before receiving. If you vote for a “pro-choice” politician, you need confession before you receive.

Why do we never hear these simple truths preached?

God Bless


#17

Some priests are afraid of the Cross they might have to bear. But, Christ calls all of us to bear our Cross, so we shouldn’t be afraid.

I know a priest that speaks out against hot-button issues in every single homily. Unfortunately, while he was speaking out against fornication, I heard a mother tell her child to cover his ears. :rolleyes:


#18

The confession times listed in my diocese website are not the only times confessions are available. I always make an appointment with my Confessor. :smiley: However, if our schedules get out of synch (he may go to a retreat, etc.) I go to confession at a church near my work that has a Priest in the confessional every day for 20 minutes. However, if any one at all in my parish is keeping track of when I go to confession . . . that person would think I never go. :bigyikes: :sad_yes: It is not that I am trying to keep it a secret, but that the Confession time at my parish are not the best for my own schedule. :shrug:


#19

from a personal standpoint. I feel much less shame staying in the pew and letting every one know I need confession than I do going to confession and knowingly adding another sin to the list. But, make know mistake, I have sinned on this issue so many times I cant even begin to count. But for now that has stopped and with the grace of God I’ll make it right going forward.


#20

That is me, too. But it is concerning that there are my neighbors (and I have been one) disrespecting the Sacrament like that. I know how it damages not only your soul, but the others around you…leading by ‘bad’ example.

I do try to focus on my own Communion with Christ in the Eucharist and in the Word, but we often sit towards the front, and my eyes sometimes inadvertently open after I’m back in my pew, and see so many people ‘popping’ the Body of Christ like it’s candy or a snack just wears on me sooooooo much.


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