Composting


#1

I’m intrigued by the idea of composting. DH plants a vegetable garden in the spring and I hear it’s good fertilizer. Does anyone here compost and if so, how hard is it go get started? How messy is it?

I haven’t really done any research so any website and/or book suggestions would be welcome. :smiley:

Thanks!


#2

Depends on how in depth do you want to get. You can pay alot of money on a composter, that can supposedly give you compost @ a faster rate. I prefer the pile in a in conspicous corner of the yard. The main thing is you need to be able to turn it over every now and then, I think the prescribed rate is around 7-10 days. Make sure that you do not put any meat by-products in the pile, other than that it’s up to your imagination, leaves, grass clippings, vegetable scraps, chicken manure. A good idea to speed up the process is to run a little water through the pile as you turn it over, not to much though. Hope this helps.


#3

I compost for the same reason you’re thinking about it, my vegetable garden. Plus it cuts down on what we send to the landfill (do you know how much you can add to a compost pile just by preparing veggies for a stir-fry??)

It’s easy, not a lot of work and, as long as you don’t put in stuff you’re not supposed to, it doesn’t smell – well ok, a faint smell of decaying leaves.

You can buy compost bins but I’ve had one and didn’t find that stuff broke down very fast. When I moved I didn’t bother with a bin.

I just found a nice sunny, fairly well drained spot in my yard.
Marked off a patch about 2 feet square.
Bought wire mesh (you could use chicken wire but I went with wire cloth as I find it easier to work with) and some tall metal plant stakes.

Planted a stake at each corner of my patch, wrapped the wire mesh around them and zip tied it to the stakes in a few places. Left one flap free for a ‘door’.

Inside the enclosure I placed 3-4" leaves and started layering leaves/grass clippings and kitchen scraps (veggie peels, tea bags/leaves, coffee grounds/filters, egg shells, stale bread, etc.) NO MEAT, FISH OR FAT

We have a fairly big yard so a regular mowing will usually produce 2-3 bags of clippings which my compost pile loves. You will find that if you leave the clippings alone and don’t disturb the pile too much it will heat up nicely and start to cook. That’s just what you want. Keep layering and every couple of weeks turn the pile, mixing everything up. Composting is as simple as that.

We have temps of -20 in the winter so I just keep a big garbage bin by the back door and in it go all my compostables. In the spring I just drag the bin to the compost pile and dump it, mixing it with leaves that I’ve kept from the fall. The frozen compostables break down quite quickly.


#4

i have a bin, when i do the lawns it all goes in with the food scraps. no meat and no oil,every 4 inches or so sprinkle with a bit of blood and bone, also sprinkle with water ,do not saturate,when bin is full sprinkle with lime and then cover with soil,(keeps the flies away),. after 2 days use a pitchfork and mix all up,be careful it can get hot as the compost is now cooking.mix with more blood and bone, cover and repeat the stirring again until the pile shrinks and cools.you can use horse and fowl manure if it is available in place of the bl/bone. in summer it should take 10 days or so, in winter up to 6 weeks, hope this helps


#5

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