Concerning dogs


#1

I apologize in advance if this an inappropiate place to post this, I couldn’t figure out a better place though.

All my life my passion has been animals, mainly dogs. I plan to become a breeder one day with the dream of improving my breed and producing great dogs. I believe dogs aren’t at a person’s level, we have dominion over them.

I don’t agree with buying expensive diamond collars or anything silly and expensive like that- but what about spending money with the purpose of raising quality dogs?

I’ll further expand on this. Vet bills, expensive but very high quality diets that does make quite a difference, competitions, travelling to competitions, training, training supplies, crates, books, and anything else to help me on my breed goals.

Would this be a sin? I’d love to hear opinions.

I don’t think it would be because it would all be with the goal of producing healthy, adjusted and sound dogs for people.


#2

I'm a dog guy, I have three of them and they mean the world to me (I'm a bachelor with no children).

It would NOT be a sin to breed dogs for finance/companionship etc. People thinking that everything could be "sinful" really demeans the word "sin".

Having said that, I don't think that breeding dogs is a good idea, in particular in this economy. Shelters are packed with dogs people give up. They have a hard enough time with feeding themselves, much less dogs.

Again, I have a boxer, bichon, and pug-they are so important to me. I know what it's like to love animals.


#3

Having a hobby is not a sin. Hobbies just need to be kept at the level of hobbies, not obesssions. If it starts to interfere with your ability to do the more important things in life, then you might be over the line. But it isn't wrong to spend some of your discretionary income on a hobby. Just look at it with wide open eyes before you enter and ask yourself if you can keep it in control.

This is why I don't have a sailboat..... :blush:


#4

We have added one pug to our family within the last year and we will be adding a second one in the next few weeks. We picked a particular breeder because he seemed to really care about his dogs, keeps in touch with the people that adopt his dogs, is always available for any questions we still have and his love for what he is doing really shows than other breeders we visited where it seemed like the puppies were more of a burden than an potential pet for a family.

I’m not sure how much our breeder spends, but it doesn’t seem to be extravagent amounts. Its the care and attention to his dogs that made the difference to us. If this is a potential side business for you, then spending money to ensure a quality dog for a family is money well spent IMO.


#5

A good dog breeder can be an asset to families seeking a pet ,farm/ranch dog, or service animal.Our first dog was a giveaway from a really dedicated breeder.Best dog ever.Wish we could have cloned her.:wink:
Our present dog is from the pound.Truthfully, he was a mess when we got him.A year & a half of living in the streets showed.He still acts a bit feral.
There are many good dogs in shelters, but some dogs are given up for a reason. They have issues that make it difficult to fit into a home.
There are also pedigreed dogs that have hereditary issues.


#6

I think you will be happy to hear about the Monks of New Scete (newsketemonks.com/dogs.htm). They are Eastern Orthodox monks; perhaps you might like to visit their monastery.

Dogs, raised well, are a gift to mankind, and raising dogs well can be a work of grace. These holy men might have some valuable guidance to offer on the vocation you are considering.


#7

Having dogs is not a sin. Missing Mass to go to a dog show is.


#8

Really, what we are talking about isn't dogs but owning and operating a business that caters to luxury items.

It is no sin to own and operate any business that offers legal, morally inoffensive things/services for purchase. The only sin involved is people spending money they don't have for such things or buying them just to show off/to make into idols or buying them at the expense of helping others.

Simply owning and operating such a business is fine--it is the purchasers who must determine if they are buying for the right reasons, not the owner.


#9

I don’t know. As a business owner, you also have to discern if the money you are spending on your product or service is at the expense of your other obligations, such as the needs of your family or other financial responsibilities. There are some business owners that think nothing of putting ALL their money into their business while not providing adequately for their family or their own needs. There has to be a balance. It can be sinful for the owner as well to be too extragent in funding their company.


#10

Thank you so much everyone for these thoughts. I feel like I've been blessed with perspective on this.

And I love the Monks of New Skete, why didn't I think of them earlier when I considered this question? :)


#11

True. I don’t think the OP would fall into that trap–although it’s a pitfall for any business to avoid.


#12

[quote="tambourine, post:1, topic:219068"]
I apologize in advance if this an inappropiate place to post this, I couldn't figure out a better place though.

All my life my passion has been animals, mainly dogs. I plan to become a breeder one day with the dream of improving my breed and producing great dogs. I believe dogs aren't at a person's level, we have dominion over them.

I don't agree with buying expensive diamond collars or anything silly and expensive like that- but what about spending money with the purpose of raising quality dogs?

I'll further expand on this. Vet bills, expensive but very high quality diets that does make quite a difference, competitions, travelling to competitions, training, training supplies, crates, books, and anything else to help me on my breed goals.

Would this be a sin? I'd love to hear opinions.

I don't think it would be because it would all be with the goal of producing healthy, adjusted and sound dogs for people.

[/quote]

Nothing wrong with having a passion for animals. I do too. Rascalking has given you a good viewpoint. .


#13

Im a ‘crazy’ dog loving woman myself, so I might be a little biased in favour of the four legged creatures in my answer.
I think your idea itself is not a sin. I would just caution you on a few very realistic practicalities that you should be aware of. First of all are you going to breed a specific type of dog breed? The danger of this is there are already many pedigree dog breeders out there and many people purchase pedigrees for the novelty not realising that they are living things which grow up, might get sick, dont always look cute or pretty or hardcore etc etc.

If you do decide to go ahead with your idea, then whatever you do please do not ever exploit your dogs for the sake of profit. It doesnt seem like you personally would do that, but I simply cannot stress it enough. I know of certain breeders who breed their female dogs at every heat and this is simply unhealthy. Cost efficient maybe but nevertheless cruel, but I trust you will not resort to such tactics for a bit of money.

Remember dogs which are treated well (i.e. not merely as a commodity or a product in a business) will be the ones most likely to become good family dogs.

God bless


#14

I can’t believe I’m the first poster to offer this perspective:

2418 It is contrary to human dignity to cause animals to suffer or die needlessly. It is likewise unworthy to spend money on them that should as a priority go to the relief of human misery. One can love animals; one should not direct to them the affection due only to persons.


#15

[quote="CatholicBoy1957, post:14, topic:219068"]
I can't believe I'm the first poster to offer this perspective:

[/quote]

First, define "affection due only to persons".

Second, a dog (or other pet) is what serves to relieve human misery.


#16

[quote="Norseman82, post:15, topic:219068"]
First, define "affection due only to persons".

Second, a dog (or other pet) is what serves to relieve human misery.

[/quote]

Glad u asked.

As with other teachings of the Church, they always can only go so far, and after that, it is something the individual must interpret on their own, using what the Church has defined as sure guidance of God's will. Prayer is needed. An intimacy with God is needed. An openness to hearing His voice. Obviously there are affections defined as sins. Beyond that, such as, kissing a dog on the lips, or sleeping with a dog, I would say I'd have to ask God in payer, if I myself were the dog owner.

Maybe you can share your dog with someone that's in misery. If someone's heat has been shut off and they are freezing, the dog can cuddle with them to temporarily warm them. If they can't afford antibiotics, maybe your dog can lick their wounds.

As I myself live in poverty, let me assure you from a first person perspective, that when it comes to relieving human misery versus what is spent on pets, almost no one has to worry about going overboard on this.


#17

[quote="CatholicBoy1957, post:16, topic:219068"]
Glad u asked.

As with other teachings of the Church, they always can only go so far, and after that, it is something the individual must interpret on their own, using what the Church has defined as sure guidance of God's will. Prayer is needed. An intimacy with God is needed. An openness to hearing His voice. Obviously there are affections defined as sins. Beyond that, such as, kissing a dog on the lips, or sleeping with a dog, I would say I'd have to ask God in payer, if I myself were the dog owner.

Maybe you can share your dog with someone that's in misery. If someone's heat has been shut off and they are freezing, the dog can cuddle with them to temporarily warm them. If they can't afford antibiotics, maybe your dog can lick their wounds.

As I myself live in poverty, let me assure you from a first person perspective, that when it comes to relieving human misery versus what is spent on pets, almost no one has to worry about going overboard on this.

[/quote]

Or maybe the simple joy of owning a pet is what helps some people get through the day. Please don't underestimate the joy of owning a pet gives to some families and people. Of course there will be some people that their attachment and affection to their pets can be seen as obsessive, but there is also a service provided by pets that until you own one, you may not understand.

Who says that people can't have both a pet and give their time and service to those in need? Sometimes pets are used for therapy in nursing homes and childrens hospitals, some are seeing eye dogs or help people that have epilepsy. For some people that are elderly and have no family to really speak of, a pet is all the companionship they may have.


#18

I’m certainly not going to blame the elderly in a case like that, but what does that say for our society? It sounds like affection is directed toward the pet that could be directed towards humans. I’m not looking to damn anyone that finds themselves in that situation, but how does this get this way?


#19

It does not have to be the only companionship they have in order for it to be a uniquely valuable sort of companionship. A child can even have a special blanket that is a wonderful thing and a unique comfort. To say that nothing could take the place of his blanket is no comment on the quality of mothering he has had. Surely we’re not going to tell grandmothers to quit making “blankies” because the child could get too attached! The same goes for dogs. Their value is not diminished by the fact that some people make too much of them, nor that some poor souls have to cling to it in place of what a person ought to be giving.


#20

Purebred dogs are at risk for everything from Boxer cardiomyopathy to SharPei allergies and skin issues, from Dobermans with Von Willebrand’s, to other breeds genetically hardwired to develop entropion, retinal atrophy, deafness, and on and on. Do not breed unless you have completed and graduated from veterinary school, and even then consider this: "Approximately 4,132,231 cats and dogs are euthanized in shelters each year in the United States alone. Extrapolating from California statistics, where about 61% of these are cats and 39% dogs, (Social Compassion in Legislation, 2009), the total numbers would be about 2,520,661 cats and 1,611,570 dogs euthanized in the U.S. each year." ~ Cat and Dog Adoption and Euthanasia Statistics, Jennifer Copley.

Breeding is an inexact science. I have been present when an entire litter of Rottweiler pups (20 weeks old) was euthanized because their hip dysplasia would eventually cripple them and they would make unsuitable pets. I could have found homes for them but the wishes of the client had to be respected and down they went.

Mixed breed dogs offer less maintenance, less veterinary bills, less high-strung activity; they give us more affection and more pleasure, and the shelters and SPCAs are full to the rafters with dogs waiting to be adopted and given loving homes and health and security. Even if they have special needs and might cost a little more, they are already here and they deserve a second chance to have loving homes and companionship. I have seen backyard breeders nearly bring down a particular breed through indiscretion, ignorance and greed.

The sin would be in bringing more dogs into this world when there are already so many sweet, loving, gentle canines out there waiting for homes. I vote for the mutts. There are enough purebreds in this world, as the economy is today most strapped individuals would buy a puppy mill Pomeranian for $400 rather than a sturdy, healthy, pedigreed Pom for $950. Twenty-eight thousand purebred dogs attended the competition at Crufts in Birmingham, England last year. What it all comes down to is money - the sire fee, the dam fee - thousands are to be made on the winner. And the rest of the contenders go home with memories and empty pockets. In order to serve society, the better choice would be to advocate for health and homes for those locked up in cages, desperate to reclaim their lives.

I vote for the mutts.

truthscout


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