Confessing to the Law?

Not to long ago (2 months or so) I did some damage to a ticket booth my township leaves in a distant gravel parking lot that only gets used once a year. I did the damages with my bb gun and I never really thought it was a big deal until it slapped me in the face and I realized what I had been doing for the past while. I got nervous and decided to buy paint for it and repair the ticket booth to the best of my ability and fix the damages I had done (I’m 15 turning 16 in September). I fixed it up and it is only now that the fair approaches when the town uses the booths that I wonder if I need call the township and report what I had done to it eve though it’s fixed. Must I confess or was repairing it to a state that was better than before the damages good enough.

My opinion is that if you repaired it to the previous condition or better then I’d leave it at that. If I had a child in the same situation as you described I’d not encourage them to involve the law. A primary reason is I don’t think our justice system is particularly fair. It is also very bureaucratic. Involving the law may lead to extra unnecessary personal and social costs. However I’d recommend taking on a penance.

I assume you confessed this. I would stick with what your confessor instructed you to do.

If you say you fixed the booth to the best of your ability, you did what you could to repair the damage.

If you go to the law over this, you will have a criminal record for vandalism. At your age it could be a be a blight on your record for the future. I think you should just leave well enough alone.

He certainly doesn’t want to get into a kidnapped Robert Louis Stevenson situation.

As a deacon, I would advise you to confess this to your priest.

As a lawyer, I would advise to shut up to every one else, especially the law.

I have already confessed this to my priest.

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