Confession and non-Catholics


#1

People outside the Catholic Church tend to think that Confession is either the best thing or the worst thing about being Catholic. But the Scriptural warrant for it and the practical effects of confession are so undeniable that some Protestant groups advocate it in their own way. On the Methodist-Catholic thread, someone mentioned a Methodist church encouraging parishioners to confess their sins to the pastor. One also hears of Evangelicals teaming up with “accountability partners” to whom one makes periodic “progress reports” – including disclosure of one’s sins.

Are there any Protestants out there who have experienced this non-sacramental form of confession? How has it helped – or has it not?


#2

I’m a Catholic. But I see the non Catholics are starting to recognise not just the scriptural basis for confession. But are beginning to appreciate the many other benefits. e.g.Not so much need to see the pschycologist anymore. Anglicans have always had confession if anyone wants it. But your told it’s not necessary. That should make them think. But not many Anglicans know this.

It’s just a shame so few Catholics use this sacrament.
I go to confession every week. It’s a great gift from God.


#3

Just a link: www.scripturecatholic.com has a lot of information about the Scriptures and Catholic practices and beliefs. You might send people there if they have questions…


#4

A lot of Evangelicals I have talked to like the confession aspect of the Church. They would disagree over who has the power to forgive sins, but its a good sign nonetheless.


#5

[quote=SwordofLight]A lot of Evangelicals I have talked to like the confession aspect of the Church. They would disagree over who has the power to forgive sins, but its a good sign nonetheless.
[/quote]

Jesus had the power to forgive sins. No doubt about it. Jesus gave that power to His Apostles. No doubt about that either (John 20:19-23), though I’ve seen some incredible interpretations of that Scripture. To a Catholic, there’s no doubt that the Apostles gave this power to those they ordained, who passed it on to those they ordained, who passed it on . . . well, you get the idea. It’s called Apostolic Succession. If the person who ordains a priest was ultimately an Apostle, in an unbroken continuum down through the centuries, that priest has the power too.

Jesus gave this gift to his Church to help us get to heaven. Priests act in persona Christi – in the person of Christ – when dispensing the Sacraments. Christ acts through his priest. We don’t confess to the priest – he’s merely the representative. We confess to Christ, and it is Christ who absolves us through his priest.

JMJ Jay


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