Confession and RCIA


#1

I have two questions that I am curious about.

Can a Protestant go to Confession?

If a Protestant has many of the same beliefs as the Roman Catholic Church, does the individual still have to go through RCIA?

Biography:
I am someone who holds the same beliefs of the Roman Catholic Church even though I am a Lutheran. I am 16 but when I graduate, I am planning on leaving the Lutheran Church over many issues.

I believe that Confession is a Sacrament but I am still questioning Holy Orders, Holy Matirimony, Anointing of the sick, and Confirmation. In the Lutheran Church we only consider Baptism and Holy Communion as sacraments.


#2

The subject of protestants recieving the Sacrament of Reconcilition has been up for debate more than once in recent years, but to answer you at todays view: No, Protestants may not go to Confession due to the fact that when we confess we recieve an absolution and then we have been reconsiled With both God and his Church.
Protestants are not part of Our Church and cannot reconsile/ get back to full communion With a Church they`ve never been a part of. However when one are about to be recieved into the Church one are permitted to confess prior to recieving ones first communion, but this the exception not the rule.

Your second question: My short answer is yes, you have to learn about Church teachings and dogma (the catecism). You may agree With some parts of the churches teachings, but in order to become Catholic you`ll need to believe in everything (at least agree With the Churchs view on the Central parts of its catecism.)

You see in the CC we have seven sacraments not two as its in the Lutheran Church.
You have to learn why we believe what we believe in order to make an desition.

I hope my anwers made sence:)
I hope that you`ll investigate the CC further and may God be With you on Your path and spiritual Journey.

Yours in Jesus and Mary

  • MarianCatholic

#3

I have drafted a document I call “Credo”. It defines what I believe and it shows just how “Catholic” I am. I consider my self to be Catholic partially in thought, word, and deed. I have posted the google drive link below

drive.google.com/file/d/0B-nlAKroFrIIaWM3R19XdG9jMEk/edit?usp=sharing


#4

No.

One who is about to become Catholic by being received into the Church (already baptized) can and should go to Confession just before that happens. See the earlier post.

If a Protestant has many of the same beliefs as the Roman Catholic Church, does the individual still have to go through RCIA?

Yes, but not necessarily what you might be asking.

All adults who are coming into the Church come in through the process of RCIA. There are different forms of RCIA. There is one for the unbaptized; this form would not apply.

There is also a form of RCIA for the previously-baptized.

Exactly how one goes through that process can vary by individual. Most parishes (at least larger ones) have group classes for these candidates.

The process does not have to be a lengthy one.

In my own parishes, I’ve occasionally had situations where someone was non-Catholic but had been attending Catholic Mass for decades (married to a Catholic), and participating in parish life in every way except for receiving Communion. For them, all that was necessary was a brief ceremony receiving them into the Church, then Confession, then Confirmation and Communion at the next Mass. Because of their situation, they did not need formal classes. Even though it’s much shorter than the typical RCIA format (ending at the Easter Vigil) it was still RCIA.

Biography:
I am someone who holds the same beliefs of the Roman Catholic Church even though I am a Lutheran. I am 16 but when I graduate, I am planning on leaving the Lutheran Church over many issues.

I believe that Confession is a Sacrament but I am still questioning Holy Orders, Holy Matirimony, Anointing of the sick, and Confirmation. In the Lutheran Church we only consider Baptism and Holy Communion as sacraments.

Because you’re a minor, I must tell you very clearly that nothing you read here should be taken as suggesting that you do anything against your parent’s or without their knowledge.

When you’re ready, talk to the nearest Catholic priest and he can guide you on the right path to becoming Catholic. Everyone’s situation is different, but no matter what, he will be able to guide you through the right program at the local parish so that you can become Catholic.


#5

Regarding confession, also called “the sacrament of penance”, from the Directory on the Principles and Norms of Ecumenism at vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/chrstuni/documents/rc_pc_chrstuni_doc_25031993_principles-and-norms-on-ecumenism_en.html :

"*b) Sharing Sacramental Life with Christians of Other Churches and Ecclesial Communities *…
130. In case of danger of death, Catholic ministers may administer these sacraments when the conditions given below (n. 131) are present. In other cases, it is strongly recommended that the diocesan Bishop, taking into account any norms which may have been established for this matter by the Episcopal Conference or by the Synods of Eastern Catholic Churches, establish general norms for judging situations of grave and pressing need and for verifying the conditions mentioned below (n. 131).135 In accord with Canon Law,136 these general norms are to be established only after consultation with at least the local competent authority of the other interested Church or ecclesial Community. Catholic ministers will judge individual cases and administer these sacraments only in accord with these established norms, where they exist. Otherwise they will judge according to the norms of this Directory.

  1. The conditions under which a Catholic minister may administer the sacraments of the Eucharist, of penance and of the anointing of the sick to a baptized person who may be found in the circumstances given above (n. 130) are that the person be unable to have recourse for the sacrament desired to a minister of his or her own Church or ecclesial Community, ask for the sacrament of his or her own initiative, manifest Catholic faith in this sacrament and be properly disposed.137"

#6

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