Confession: forgotten sins

Hi everyone,

I know that if you forget some sins in the confessional they are forgiven. But what if they are mortal sins? Are only forgotten venial sins forgiven but if you forget to mention a mortal sin, you have to mention it at your next confession?

Thanks

:thumbsup:

They are forgiven if you have genuinely forgotten themā€¦ That is until you happen to remember them for any reason. Once you remember that sin, which you have not confessed, you should confess.

Thank you.

Could you provide a source for your claim about remembering them? If we make a valid confession and are reconciled with God, how can remembering something remove us from being in a state of grace (requiring confession)?

catholic.org/prayers/confession.php

After Confession

Give thanks to God for forgiving you again. If you recall some serious sin you forgot to tell, rest assured that it has been forgiven with the others, but be sure to confess it in your next Confession.

Do your assigned Penance.

Resolve to return to the Sacrament of Reconciliation often. We Catholics are fortunate to have the Sacrament of Reconciliation. It is the ordinary way for us to have our sins forgiven. This sacrament is a powerful help to get rid of our weaknesses, grow in holiness, and lead a balanced and virtuous life.

In otherwords,

if you forgot in the moment donā€™t sweat it, but please do confess it next oppertunity you have.

It does not remove youā€¦ :slight_smile:

Yes we are* obliged * to confess all mortal sins in number and in kind (and circumstances that change the sinā€¦like it was your brother you murdered).

And if we forget one or to say the numberā€¦so long as we are sorry (via the normal requirements for confession) and not hiding the sinā€¦it can be *absolved *indirectly along with the other mortal sinsā€¦or if one did not have any other mortal sinsā€¦the ā€œat least one confessed with contrition etc venial sinā€ (one of course has contrition for all ones mortal sinsā€¦and one would have confessed it etc had they known itā€¦).

But one is obliged to confess that mortal sin that was forgotten (not concealed!) in the next confession (I would do it soon so one does not forget itā€¦but it perhaps could be argued that one ought to do it like within the year if one does not go frequently) when once one has remembered it.

It is not that one then all of a sudden leaves a state of graceā€¦one only does that by a new mortal sinā€¦(which though can happen if one then saysā€¦I am not going to confess that mortal sin even though I know I am obliged toā€¦with full knowledge and complete consentā€¦but that is hopefully not going to happenā€¦)

(and one of course go to Holy Communion ā€¦one does not have to wait til one confesses the honestly forgotten mortal sin in confession)

Venial sins can be forgiven in many waysā€¦though yes confession of them (at least some) is very recommendedā€¦

That makes sense. I have another question (hopefully Iā€™m not hijacking the thread): we have an obligation to confess all mortal sins. However, confessing these sins is not always done to restore us to a state of grace, as in the case of forgotten and then remembered mortal sins. What is the effect/purpose of confessing a sin for which we have already been forgiven?

As a corollary, how many hundreds or thousands of these unconfessed mortal sins must we all be carrying around due to our changes of heart? To use your example, suppose one decides 12 times not to confess a forgotten-then-remembered mortal sin before finally deciding that one will confess it? What effect do all of those sins (which we may never remember) have on our souls?

One is ā€œsubmittingā€ those sins to the ā€œkeysā€ ā€¦

We are obliged to confess all mortal sinsā€¦

The Sacrament is also juridical ā€¦one is accusing ā€¦ā€œconfessingā€ ones sinsā€¦and then one is given a penance and absolved.

Heck they can be forgiven way before confession by grace via an act of perfect contrition (with the intent to confess as soon as is possible too).

(in that case one ā€¦while they may be restored to the life of graceā€¦they are not to go to communion until they confess the mortal sins (though there are some exceptions which we will not go into here).

Or in the case of a plane going downā€¦and the Priest gives everyone who can receive itā€¦general absolutionā€¦if they survive ā€¦they are obliged to confess all mortal sins. (In that case they must do so as soon as possibleā€¦not wait til the next confession.)

Hopefully not that manyā€¦

One needs to confess the ā€œhiddenā€ mortal sinā€¦and the fact of hiding itā€¦and the other mortal sins one has confessed at that time or sinceā€¦or has committed sinceā€¦(and of course in number and kind etc)

(so do not hide them!)

But forgotten mortal sins are very different.

The ones that one never remembers ā€¦that are forgottenā€¦are absolved indirectly (in the way noted above). They do not effect one ā€œbeing alive in Christā€ of knowing true life in him. For they are forgottenā€¦of course one should do a diligent examine for confessionā€¦but without scruplesā€¦but if one can not remember a mortal sinā€¦it can be absolved indirectly.

Now one may have had more of the ā€œtemporal effectsā€ removed quicker had one remembered itā€¦but it certainly does not keep one from a state of graceā€¦

But not really a worry there forā€¦ā€œgeneral acts of penanceā€ and indulgences do not require one to ā€œremember what sins one has doneā€ā€¦

(well unless it is ā€˜forgottenā€™ cause one is living in state of mortal sin by living with ones girlfriendā€¦and thus not repentingā€¦and not examining ones life reallyā€¦that is not what mean here)

Bookcat uses KNOWLEDGE.

Itā€™s super effective!

Thanks Bookcat. I understand now.

ā€œThis juridical-sacramental character of the sacrament has two important implications: if this is the reality, we must speak of a sacrament that is different from Baptism, of a specific sacrament, that supposes a special sacramental power, that is linked with the Sacrament of Orders (1684). If, however, there is also a judicial evaluation, then it is clear that the judge has to know the facts of the case on which he is to judge. The necessity of the personal confession with the telling of the sins, for which one must ask pardon of God and of the Church because they have broken the unity of love with God that is given by baptism, is implicit in the juridical aspect. At this point the Council can say that it is necessary iure divino (by divine law) to confess each and every mortal sin (Canon 7, 1707). So the Council teaches that the duty of confession was instituted by the Lord himself and is constitutive of the sacrament, and so not left to the disposition of the Church.ā€-- Cardinal Ratzinger ā€¦

Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Presentation of the Apostolic Letter in the Form of Motu ProprioMisericordia Dei .2002

ā€œThis juridical-sacramental character of the sacrament has two important implications: if this is the reality, we must speak of a sacrament that is different from Baptism, of a specific sacrament, that supposes a special sacramental power, that is linked with the Sacrament of Orders (1684). If, however, there is also a judicial evaluation, then it is clear that the judge has to know the facts of the case on which he is to judge. The necessity of the personal confession with the telling of the sins, for which one must ask pardon of God and of the Church because they have broken the unity of love with God that is given by baptism, is implicit in the juridical aspect. At this point the Council can say that it is necessary iure divino (by divine law) to confess each and every mortal sin (Canon 7, 1707). So the Council teaches that the duty of confession was instituted by the Lord himself and is constitutive of the sacrament, and so not left to the disposition of the Church.ā€-- Cardinal Ratzinger ā€¦

Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Presentation of the Apostolic Letter in the Form of Motu ProprioMisericordia Dei .2002

One more note,

While one is forgiven of all forgotten sinsā€¦ It also makes sense to consider that disobedience to the ordiences of the Church (based upon Christā€™s ordiences) is in itā€™s self grave matter as well.

So itā€™s possible that even if you are forgive already from the accidently forgotten sin (specifically), by choosing later after it is remembered to continue concealing it (purposfully now) you are being disobedient. This disobedience could in itā€™s self become a different, grave or mortal sin.

I will qualify that I havenā€™t really looked specifically into everything I just said. Itā€™s based upon my general knowlege of sin, and my personal ā€œbetter safe than sorryā€ attitude. When in doubt, confess.

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