Confession - Latin


#1

Hi All, and Happy Saint Valentine’s Day,!
I would like to start going to Confession using the 1962 Missale Romanum. I would have to supply the prayers for my priest since he most likely doesn’t know them.

What does the penitent say in the entire confession and what words does the priest say? I have heard that the priest gave a blessing :shrug: , if possible please include that! Thanks and God Bless!


#2

I don't know the answer to your question, however I thought you might be interested to know that I have had three confessors (out of several dozen) who regularly gave the absolution in Latin. Two of them were visiting priests who's English was not good, but one, just last week, was a young Australian priest, who chose to use Latin. It is beautiful to hear the words "Ego te absolvo", under the sign of the cross!


#3

[quote="holyfamily1, post:1, topic:315002"]
Hi All, and Happy Saint Valentine's Day,!
I would like to start going to Confession using the 1962 Missale Romanum. I would have to supply the prayers for my priest since he most likely doesn't know them.

What does the penitent say in the entire confession and what words does the priest say? I have heard that the priest gave a blessing :shrug: , if possible please include that! Thanks and God Bless!

[/quote]

Did your priest say that he would follow the 1962 Missale Romanum? I am pretty certain that the priest decides what form he uses. Here is the older absolution:

"Dominus noster Jesus Christus te absolvat; et ego auctoritate ipsius te absolvo ab omni vinculo excommunicationis (suspensionis) et interdicti in quantum possum et tu indiges. Deinde, ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis in nomine Patris, et Filii, + et Spiritus Sancti. Amen."

See this for more info: fisheaters.com/sampleconfession.html


#4

I clicked on the fisheater …to view the sample confession…that’s how I go to confession now…did I miss something ?


#5

Just go to a FSSP priest. If you're still in the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, there are two parishes in your area.


#6

[quote="majorem, post:4, topic:315002"]
I clicked on the fisheater ..to view the sample confession...that's how I go to confession now...did I miss something ?

[/quote]

You missed the part wear the priest absolves you in the older Latin form and gives you a Latin blessing.

Absolution: Dominus noster Jesus Christus te absolvat; et ego auctoritate ipsius te absolvo ab omni vinculo excommunicationis (suspensionis) et interdicti in quantum possum et tu indiges. [making the Sign of the Cross:] Deinde, ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis in nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen.

Blessing: Passio Domini nostri Jesu Christi, merita Beatae Mariae Virginis et omnium sanctorum, quidquid boni feceris vel mail sustinueris sint tibi in remissionem peccatorum, augmentum gratiae et praemium vitae aeternae.


#7

[quote="Edmundus1581, post:2, topic:315002"]
It is beautiful to hear the words "Ego te absolvo", under the sign of the cross!

[/quote]

Why is this more beautiful than hearing the words "I absolve you"? Or is there a difference in the rite (thus "under the sign of the cross") in addition to the words of absolution that make it more beautiful?

When my own priest came to this country, he had not yet learned the words of absolution in English, so he said them in his native language. I didn't mind, as I knew what he was saying anyway, but when he learned the prayer in English and started saying the absolution in my own language, it had more emotional impact for me. I have always wondered why some prefer to hear the absolution in Latin.


#8

I like the Byzantine Rite absolution. The priest places his epitrachelion/stole over my bowed head and says:

"God it was who forgave David through Nathan the Prophet, when he confessed his sins, and Peter weeping bitterly for his denial, and the sinful woman in tears at his feet, and the Publican, and the Prodigal Son: May that same God forgive thee all things, through me a sinner, both in this present world, and in that which is to come, and set thee uncondemmed before his dread Judgement Seat. And now, having no further care for the sins which thou hast declared, depart in peace."

And then makes the Sign of the Cross on top of my bowed head.

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/166700_131584337012907_748239456_n.jpg


#9

[quote="Zekariya, post:8, topic:315002"]
I like the Byzantine Rite absolution. The priest places his epitrachelion/stole over my bowed head and says:

"God it was who forgave David through Nathan the Prophet, when he confessed his sins, and Peter weeping bitterly for his denial, and the sinful woman in tears at his feet, and the Publican, and the Prodigal Son: May that same God forgive thee all things, through me a sinner, both in this present world, and in that which is to come, and set thee uncondemmed before his dread Judgement Seat. And now, having no further care for the sins which thou hast declared, depart in peace."

And then makes the Sign of the Cross on top of my bowed head.

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/166700_131584337012907_748239456_n.jpg

[/quote]

:thumbsup: My favorite as well.


#10

[quote="Zekariya, post:6, topic:315002"]
You missed the part wear the priest absolves you in the older Latin form and gives you a Latin blessing.

Absolution: Dominus noster Jesus Christus te absolvat; et ego auctoritate ipsius te absolvo ab omni vinculo excommunicationis (suspensionis) et interdicti in quantum possum et tu indiges. [making the Sign of the Cross:] Deinde, ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis in nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen.

Blessing: Passio Domini nostri Jesu Christi, merita Beatae Mariae Virginis et omnium sanctorum, quidquid boni feceris vel mail sustinueris sint tibi in remissionem peccatorum, augmentum gratiae et praemium vitae aeternae.

[/quote]

Not all priests give the blessing, which is actually a prayer requesting that the good you
Do and evil you experience from your sins be applied to your time in purgatory. Not a priests recite this. Mine is FSSP and he leaves it out. :(


#11

[quote="babochka, post:7, topic:315002"]
Why is this more beautiful than hearing the words "I absolve you"? Or is there a difference in the rite (thus "under the sign of the cross") in addition to the words of absolution that make it more beautiful?

When my own priest came to this country, he had not yet learned the words of absolution in English, so he said them in his native language. I didn't mind, as I knew what he was saying anyway, but when he learned the prayer in English and started saying the absolution in my own language, it had more emotional impact for me. I have always wondered why some prefer to hear the absolution in Latin.

[/quote]

It's more difficult for the priest to change the words of absolution when they're said in Latin. For me my previous confessor had a way of pronouncing the "Deinde ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis, in nomine Patris, et Filii, + et Spiritus Sancti. Amen." that my current confessor doesn't do, but as long as whomever has faculties to absolve sins, and uses the correct form, I'm happy.


#12

[quote="holyfamily1, post:1, topic:315002"]
Hi All, and Happy Saint Valentine's Day,!
I would like to start going to Confession using the 1962 Missale Romanum. I would have to supply the prayers for my priest since he most likely doesn't know them.

What does the penitent say in the entire confession and what words does the priest say? I have heard that the priest gave a blessing :shrug: , if possible please include that! Thanks and God Bless!

[/quote]

why?
Okay am Anglican and therefore don't understand the whole of Catholic Confession.

But why do it in a language that isn't exactly yours when for Catholics Confession is about Absolution and being in the State of Grace for God, to receive communion in a state of Grace. Of what relevence therefore is the language when language is just a source of communication. Are you trying to glorify confession into more than it is? Do you say all your prayers in Latin.

Ps do you comit your sins in latin. would you list your sins in latin? Not much point in the rest if you don't commit your sins in latin.

I would have thought unless your everyday language is in Latin then you stick with your everyday language and go home and translate any prayers he gives you on your own merit if you really want to say them in latin. It is more important to be sorry and humble for your sins rather than showing off you can do Latin:shrug:

God is interested in you being sorry and love in confession, not the language it is given in...?


#13

[quote="englishredrose, post:12, topic:315002"]
why?
Okay am Anglican and therefore don't understand the whole of Catholic Confession.

But why do it in a language that isn't exactly yours when for Catholics Confession is about Absolution and being in the State of Grace for God, to receive communion in a state of Grace. Of what relevence therefore is the language when language is just a source of communication. Are you trying to glorify confession into more than it is? Do you say all your prayers in Latin.

Ps do you comit your sins in latin. would you list your sins in latin? Not much point in the rest if you don't commit your sins in latin.

I would have thought unless your everyday language is in Latin then you stick with your everyday language and go home and translate any prayers he gives you on your own merit if you really want to say them in latin. It is more important to be sorry and humble for your sins rather than showing off you can do Latin:shrug:

God is interested in you being sorry and love in confession, not the language it is given in...?

[/quote]

I wouldn't be the one speaking Latin, Father would be.


#14

My Priest who is getting more and more orthodox (cassock, surplice, purple stole!!! :smiley: ), already gives the blessing but in English. I think that if I ask him to use this he will be glad someone wants it and he will use it for more and more people. :thumbsup:


#15

God is interested in you being sorry and love in confession, not the language it is given in...?

To put it simply, Latin is a good antidote to much of the ad lib fudging that can go on in the vernacular. The sacrament is a judicial act in addition to being spiritual healing. That is, in a manner of speaking, Our Lord set up a lower court in the apostles and their successors and the good news is that He promised that he would uphold their rulings of forgiveness so to speak. Just as you wouldn't think much of a judge who said, "I find you sort of innocent and sentence you to whatever.", so it is important that confession leave no doubt in the penitent's mind that he is absolved.


#16

Would this be correct, in accord with all of the rubrics of 1962:? Is the act of contrition prayed in latin??

R: Bless me, Father, for I have sinned.
I confess to God Almighty and to you, Father.
It has been ___________ (days, weeks, months, years) since my last confession.
I have received absolution and performed (not performed) my penance.

R: Then you tell your sins. All mortal sins must be confessed in order to make a good confession. Venial sins may be confessed, and it is a very beneficial to do so on a spiritual level. When you have finished, add:

R: For these and all the sins that I can’t remember, and all the sins of my past life (you can specify one or another), I ask pardon of God and penance and absolution of you, Father.

P: The priest then may give you some words of advise and he gives you a penance. Then you say your act of contrition.

R: O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee and I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art so good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of thy grace, to confess my sins, to do penance and to amend my life. Amen.

P: Dominus noster Jesus Christus te absolvat; et ego auctoritate ipsius te absolvo ab omni vinculo excommunicationis (suspensionis) et interdicti in quantum possum et tu indiges. + Deinde, ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis in nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen.
R: Amen.

P: Passio Domini nostri Jesu Christi, merita Beatae Mariae Virginis et omnium sanctorum, quidquid boni feceris vel mail sustinueris sint tibi in remissionem peccatorum, augmentum gratiae et praemium vitae aeternae.
R: Amen


#17

:thumbsup: I also like facing the icon of Jesus while confessing. It helps me remember Whom I am really confessing to.


#18

[quote="englishredrose, post:12, topic:315002"]
why?
Okay am Anglican and therefore don't understand the whole of Catholic Confession.

But why do it in a language that isn't exactly yours when for Catholics Confession is about Absolution and being in the State of Grace for God, to receive communion in a state of Grace. Of what relevence therefore is the language when language is just a source of communication. Are you trying to glorify confession into more than it is? Do you say all your prayers in Latin.

Ps do you comit your sins in latin. would you list your sins in latin? Not much point in the rest if you don't commit your sins in latin.

I would have thought unless your everyday language is in Latin then you stick with your everyday language and go home and translate any prayers he gives you on your own merit if you really want to say them in latin. It is more important to be sorry and humble for your sins rather than showing off you can do Latin:shrug:

God is interested in you being sorry and love in confession, not the language it is given in...?

[/quote]

As Latin Rite Catholics, Latin is our official universal language. If I needed to, with a little effort, I could confess my sins in Latin. Not all priests are particularly good at English, but many of those priests know Latin well enough they could do an entire confession in Latin. Also, Latin is supposed to be used, but the Church now permits the use of vernacular language. The sacrament of penance prior to Vatican II has a different form than what is used now by most priests. The essential words are still the same, but when all the parts are said, it asks for things the other form doesn't ask for. That said, both are perfectly valid and there is nothing wrong with the new form.


#19

[quote="holyfamily1, post:16, topic:315002"]
Would this be correct, in accord with all of the rubrics of 1962:? Is the act of contrition prayed in latin??

[/quote]

The forms you provided are correct, but the act of contrition is prayed on one's own language. (There is not actually any one set form of the act of contrition; there are several popular variations.) The penintent prays the act while the priest begins the Latin formula of absolution, so you do not really hear him, except the final words "Ego to absolvo..."

If your priest is not accustomed to celebrating the sacraments in the EF, I would not expect him to do so for you. Go to an FSSP parish, or have the sacrament celebrated according to the OF.


#20

[quote="Chatter163, post:19, topic:315002"]
The forms you provided are correct, but the act of contrition is prayed on one's own language. (There is not actually any one set form of the act of contrition; there are several popular variations.) The penintent prays the act while the priest begins the Latin formula of absolution, so you do not really hear him, except the final words "Ego to absolvo..."

If your priest is not accustomed to celebrating the sacraments in the EF, I would not expect him to do so for you. Go to an FSSP parish, or have the sacrament celebrated according to the OF.

[/quote]

I ask my priest today and he will do it on Tuesday!! Very happy!

Thanks ALL!


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