Confession question?


#1

Me and my husband missed Mass on a Holy Day of Obligation. We didn’t miss on purpose we just forgot ( we’re kind of new Catholics still trying to get everything down). My question is do we have to go to confession before we can take Holy Communion again? Any help would be great.


#2

You mean that you had intended to go to all Sundays and Holy Days of obligation but --through no fault of your own-- you just forgot that such and such day was a Holy Day?

Or that you intended to go to the Holy Day and planned on it --but when the day came --again through no fault of yours -- it simply completely slipped your mind that it was that day?


#3

Compendium issued by Pope Benedict XVI

  1. When does one commit a mortal sin?

1855-1861
1874

One commits a mortal sin when there are simultaneously present: grave matter, full knowledge, and deliberate consent. This sin destroys charity in us, deprives us of sanctifying grace, and, if unrepented, leads us to the eternal death of hell. It can be forgiven in the ordinary way by means of the sacraments of Baptism and of Penance or Reconciliation.

  1. When does one commit a venial sin?

1862-1864
1875

One commits a venial sin, which is essentially different from a mortal sin, when the matter involved is less serious or, even if it is grave, when full knowledge or complete consent are absent. Venial sin does not break the covenant with God but it weakens charity and manifests a disordered affection for created goods. It impedes the progress of a soul in the exercise

vatican.va/archive/compendium_ccc/documents/archive_2005_compendium-ccc_en.html


#4

More:

  1. Which sins must be confessed?

1456

All grave sins not yet confessed, which a careful examination of conscience brings to mind, must be brought to the sacrament of Penance. The confession of serious sins is the only ordinary way to obtain forgiveness.

  1. When is a person obliged to confess mortal sins?

1457

Each of the faithful who has reached the age of discretion is bound to confess his or her mortal sins at least once a year and always before receiving Holy Communion.

  1. Why can venial sins also be the object of sacramental confession?

1458

The confession of venial sins is strongly recommended by the Church, even if this is not strictly necessary, because it helps us to form a correct conscience and to fight against evil tendencies. It allows us to be healed by Christ and to progress in the life of the Spirit.

(note "grave sins" means the same as "mortal sins")


#5

Furthermore the Compendium notes:

To receive Holy Communion one must be fully incorporated into the Catholic Church and be in the state of grace, that is, not conscious of being in mortal sin. Anyone who is conscious of having committed a grave sin must first receive the sacrament of Reconciliation before going to Communion.


#6

That all being noted --one would examine ones conscience and ask -- did I have those three aspects needed to commit a mortal sin of missing a Holy Day?

If one then is not conscious of having committed a mortal sin --there would not be any need to confess such.


#7

I didn't realize until the next Sunday that we missed a Holy Day. I forgot about it.


#8

Catechism:

2181 The Sunday Eucharist is the foundation and confirmation of all Christian practice. For this reason the faithful are obliged to participate in the Eucharist on days of obligation, unless excused for a serious reason (for example, illness, the care of infants) or dispensed by their own pastor.119 Those who deliberately fail in this obligation commit a grave sin.


#9

Now of course I may somewhat responsible for not remembering...or not bothering to be aware of such....or even intentionally put it out of my mind so I would forget etc etc

Or I might simply been in good faith and completely forgot via no fault of my own.

One has to judge according to what took place.


#10

Catechism:

2181 The Sunday Eucharist is the foundation and confirmation of all Christian practice. For this reason the faithful are obliged to participate in the Eucharist on days of obligation, unless excused for a serious reason (for example, illness, the care of infants) or dispensed by their own pastor.119 Those who deliberately fail in this obligation commit a grave sin.


#11

More from the Catechism:

1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent."131

..............

1859 Mortal sin requires full knowledge *and complete consent*. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God's law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart133 do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.

1860 Unintentional ignorance can diminish or even remove the imputability of a grave offense. But no one is deemed to be ignorant of the principles of the moral law, which are written in the conscience of every man. The promptings of feelings and passions can also diminish the voluntary and free character of the offense, as can external pressures or pathological disorders. Sin committed through malice, by deliberate choice of evil, is the gravest.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c1a8.htm#IV


#12

When in doubt, confess…just to be safe but I do understand where you are coming from as this is my first year as a Catholic and I almost missed a Holy Day of Obligation due to not really knowing for sure which are which and being confused.

My love in Christ,
mlz


#13

If you just forgot, this is a venial sin. I would not think that you need to abstain from Communion. You should mention this at your next confession and resolve to be more attentive to Holy Days of Obligation.


#14

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