Confession Question


#1

A while ago I read in the Baltimore Catechism that one of the requirements of a valid confession is hatred of sins confessed. I didn't hate my sins (at least not most of them) but continued to go to Confession anyway because I believed that the hatred wasn't meant literally, but that I just had to regret my sins (which I did.) I finally found a way to hate the sins I had committed. Does anyone know if the Baltimore Catechism is literal when it talks about hating sins and so do I now have to re-confess the sins I now hate in order for them to be forgiven? They are mortal sins.

Also, with the sins I used to not hate, I also confessed some sins I do hate, which are also mortal, so do I have to re-confess those along with them since my confessions were invalid? I mean, if they were invalid?


#2

If you're not sure about the validity of your confession, I would talk to the priest when you go to confession next time.

When I would confess my sins, I really had sorrow in my heart for them, and I didn't want to do them. I was really upset and concerned. I had what we call a "contrite heart."

I am certainly not implying that you didn't feel bad. Not at all, so please don't think this.

Only you know how you feel or how you felt in your heart, and you know the best way that you can describe it for you, to a priest, regarding your sins. That is why I think that it is best to discuss this with a priest, and ask him the next time that you go to confession.


#3

I think you are over-reading too much. Contrition, which you expressed in your regret for your sins, is what is required. The hatred is not your emotional feelings, but your will and choice to humble yourself before God and ask forgiveness and try not to sin again. A visceral emotional reaction against sin is a good thing to have, but that isn't the hatred they are referring to.

Do you have the specific section from the catechism so we can read it directly?


#4

[quote="ChibiViolet, post:1, topic:350908"]
A while ago I read in the Baltimore Catechism that one of the requirements of a valid confession is hatred of sins confessed. I didn't hate my sins (at least not most of them) but continued to go to Confession anyway because I believed that the hatred wasn't meant literally, but that I just had to regret my sins (which I did.) I finally found a way to hate the sins I had committed. Does anyone know if the Baltimore Catechism is literal when it talks about hating sins and so do I now have to re-confess the sins I now hate in order for them to be forgiven? They are mortal sins.

Also, with the sins I used to not hate, I also confessed some sins I do hate, which are also mortal, so do I have to re-confess those along with them since my confessions were invalid? I mean, if they were invalid?

[/quote]

This is from Baltimore Catechism No. 4 Lesson 18: ON CONTRITION

  1. Q. What is contrition or sorrow for sin? A. Contrition or sorrow for sin is a hatred of sin and a true grief of the soul for having offended God, with a firm purpose of sinning no more.

"Offended" that is, done something to displease Him.

  1. Q. What is imperfect contrition?
    A. Imperfect contrition is that by which we hate what offends God because by it we lose Heaven and deserve Hell; or because sin is so hateful in itself.

  2. Q. What is perfect contrition?
    A. Perfect contrition is that which fills us with sorrow and hatred for sin because it offends God, who is infinitely good in Himself and worthy of all love.

It can be a very hard thing to have perfect contrition, but we should always try to have it, so that our contrition may be as perfect as possible. This perfect contrition is the kind of contrition we must have if our mortal sins are to be forgiven if we are in danger of death and cannot go to confession. Imperfect contrition with the priest's absolution will blot out our mortal sins.


#5

[quote="Vico, post:4, topic:350908"]
This is from Baltimore Catechism No. 4 Lesson 18: ON CONTRITION

  1. Q. What is contrition or sorrow for sin? A. Contrition or sorrow for sin is a hatred of sin and a true grief of the soul for having offended God, with a firm purpose of sinning no more.

"Offended" that is, done something to displease Him.

  1. Q. What is imperfect contrition?
    A. Imperfect contrition is that by which we hate what offends God because by it we lose Heaven and deserve Hell; or because sin is so hateful in itself.

  2. Q. What is perfect contrition?
    A. Perfect contrition is that which fills us with sorrow and hatred for sin because it offends God, who is infinitely good in Himself and worthy of all love.

It can be a very hard thing to have perfect contrition, but we should always try to have it, so that our contrition may be as perfect as possible. This perfect contrition is the kind of contrition we must have if our mortal sins are to be forgiven if we are in danger of death and cannot go to confession. Imperfect contrition with the priest's absolution will blot out our mortal sins.

[/quote]

Let's also keep two things in mind regarding the Baltimore Catechism (I'm paraphrasing from my Archbishop):

1) It was never the official catechism of the entire Catholic Church (it was written by USCCB and for the Church in America)
2) It might use some language that today is used a little differently today.

NOW, I'm not saying that the Baltimore Catechism is bad. But it most likely wasn't given the level of scrutiny that the CCC was given to make sure it was very clear.

God Bless.


#6

[quote="phil19034, post:5, topic:350908"]
Let's also keep two things in mind regarding the Baltimore Catechism (I'm paraphrasing from my Archbishop):

1) It was never the official catechism of the entire Catholic Church (it was written by USCCB and for the Church in America)
2) It might use some language that today is used a little differently today.

NOW, I'm not saying that the Baltimore Catechism is bad. But it most likely wasn't given the level of scrutiny that the CCC was given to make sure it was very clear.

God Bless.

[/quote]

That is certainly true. From the universal Catechism of the Catholic Church which uses the word detestation rather than hatred in the Baltimore Catechism: Contrition
1451 Among the penitent's acts contrition occupies first place. Contrition is "sorrow of the soul and detestation for the sin committed, together with the resolution not to sin again." 50
1452 When it arises from a love by which God is loved above all else, contrition is called "perfect" (contrition of charity). Such contrition remits venial sins; it also obtains forgiveness of mortal sins if it includes the firm resolution to have recourse to sacramental confession as soon as possible. 51

1453 The contrition called "imperfect" (or "attrition") is also a gift of God, a prompting of the Holy Spirit. It is born of the consideration of sin's ugliness or the fear of eternal damnation and the other penalties threatening the sinner (contrition of fear). Such a stirring of conscience can initiate an interior process which, under the prompting of grace, will be brought to completion by sacramental absolution. By itself however, imperfect contrition cannot obtain the forgiveness of grave sins, but it disposes one to obtain forgiveness in the sacrament of Penance. 52

Collins Dictionary
hatred (British): a feeling of intense dislike; enmity
hatred (American): strong dislike or ill will; hate
detestation: intense hatred; abhorrence


#7

Well, I didn’t detest the afore mentioned mortal sins. Does that mean my contrition wasn’t really contrition or only that it wasn’t perfect?


#8

The answer is in one version of the act of contrition, detestation of what was done, because of the punishment of hell, is sufficient.
O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee; And I detest all my sins because of Thy just punishment, But most of all, because I have offended Thee, my God, Who art all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy Grace, to sin no more, and to avoid the near occasion of sin. Amen.


#9

Hatred of sin is that a person detests the sin because it blocks their union with Jesus Christ.

It is because of this intense dislike for the effects of the sinful act that a person resolves to remove the sin from their life. It doesn’t require that a person hate the act in itself for the act in itself may be good in other circumstances; unless the act in itself is evil.

For example, the sin of adultery. The act in itself is not bad, and is indeed an act that is a part of a sacramental bond in marriage.

What is hated is that this act has hurt the person’s relationship with Jesus Christ. This is expressed by the person’s confession or the perfect act of sorrowful love, that is, which includes the determination to avoid this devious act for which they expressed remorse.

May God bless and keep you. May God’s face shine on you. May God be kind to you and give you peace.


#10

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