Confession

Hi–Can a non-Catholic go to confession to talk about their sins?–nicolo

Anyone can make an appointment to talk with a priest about a problem. If you are not Catholic, you may not find their advice useful, but sometimes it just helps to get something off your chest. This should not, for the non-catholic, be done in a confession setting.

Any non-Catholic can indeed go to confession, however the non-Catholic can not and will not receive absolution.

Ken

A non-Catholic can not receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation, otherwise known as the sacrament of confession. Of course he may talk to a priest; that’s not a sacrament.

Do you mean that God sits up on his throne and would block absolution from someone that wasn’t catholic? I highly doubt that.
If my brother’s wife received the Catholic sacrement of marriage and wasn’t a Catholic…
I would bet you dollars to doughnuts that Catholic priests are not being overrun by non-Catholics begging for confession. When it does occur I bet it is a unique situation. Therefore, the priest acting as a spiritual physcian may actually hear a non-catholic’s confession and absolve the non-catholic. Even if it is not permitted in the pocket sized code of canon law and girm regulations book.

[quote=mgy100]Do you mean that God sits up on his throne and would block absolution from someone that wasn’t catholic? I highly doubt that.
If my brother’s wife received the Catholic sacrement of marriage and wasn’t a Catholic…
I would bet you dollars to doughnuts that Catholic priests are not being overrun by non-Catholics begging for confession. When it does occur I bet it is a unique situation. Therefore, the priest acting as a spiritual physcian may actually hear a non-catholic’s confession and absolve the non-catholic. Even if it is not permitted in the pocket sized code of canon law and girm regulations book.
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I found this for you. Michelle Arnold is one of the staff Apologists here and provides some good background to explain more. You won’t be able to reply there, but you can read it and reply here if you have further question. Also, please feel free to submit a followup question to “Ask an Apologist” if you still struggle with something Michelle has stated so they can have an opportunity to address your concern. But I would copy that thread into your question so they can see what you are referring to.

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=19886&highlight=non-catholic+confession

I do know that non-Catholics can enter the confessional and inform the priest that they are not Catholic and would like to unburden themselves of some sins. Fr. Corapi has spoken on this and how even Jewish people have entered his confessional. What most priests will do is to listen and offer a blessing, but they cannot absolve someone who does not fit the criteria outlined so eloquently by Michelle Arnold.

I personally believe that God graces some non-Catholics with a desire to enter the confessional (which takes guts, imho) so that he can bring them further into exploring the faith. Most priests know that this is one of the greatest opportunities for evangelization. But, they cannot give absolution without the person meeting the criteria.

Also, we need to understand what is required for a Catholic to receive absolution: Firm purpose of amendment.

For a Catholic to speak against any dogma (things that Catholics are required to accept without question, such as the divinity of Jesus Christ, or the Real Presence), it is considered sinful, requiring sacramental confession. Sacramental confession involves a firm purpose of amendment. This means that the Catholic who speaks out against the dogma - heresy - must agree to fall in line with that dogma not only in word and action, but in heart, mind and soul. Sinning is possible in the heart just as Jesus pointed out how we can be guilty of fornication or adultery simply by looking at another with lustful thoughts. This is just one of many reasons why absolution cannot take place technically. One who is not Catholic has not been instructed on the faith and very likely has many heretical beliefs that won’t change overnight. Rather it is a process that requires catechesis and why people need to approach a priest and discuss the convert process.

The very best answers are those that are backed up with something from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Canon Law, or other approved document. There is much inuendo out there proclaimed in the name of Catholicism. If you want to know what the Catholic Church teaches (not someone’s wishful thinking) always look for backup. In time, you will find all of the resources like I did and when needed, use the “Ask an Apologist” to help you navigate through it all. Don’t hesitate to ask them in your post to provide links to the CCC or Canon Law to help you.

God Bless!

Sacrament of reconciliation is not just reconciliation to God but also to His church, there fore if a non catholic undergo a sacrament of reconciliation he must also undergo reconciliation to the Holy Catholic Church.

I think it is more appropriate for him to talk to the priest and ask some advise than undergo a sacrament of reconciliation.

[quote=Lux_et_veritas]I personally believe that God graces some non-Catholics with a desire to enter the confessional (which takes guts, imho) so that he can bring them further into exploring the faith. Most priests know that this is one of the greatest opportunities for evangelization. But, they cannot give absolution without the person meeting the criteria.
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Forgive me but…

non-Catholic: I am not Catholic, Father, but I would like to be absolved.

Priest: Sorry my son, I have bad news, I cannot absolve you.

non-Catholic: …

Priest: But don’t worry, I have some good news.

non-Catholic: There’s an exception?

Priest: No. I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by switching to Geico.


In all seriousness, though. In times of grave danger, a non-Catholic who asks a priest for confession/absolution, who manifests the belief of the Church, can receive absolution, right? Or something like that?

Recently, Father Benedict Groeschel on ETWN Sunday night live, said word-for-word what Michelle Arnold and Lux et Veritas wrote.

Non-catholics can confess their sins, but the best the priest can do is pray with them and give them his blessing.

Of course, we don’t know what goes through God’s mind… but that’s not for us to know.

In case of imminent death, the priest can give a general absolution. Several priests did this on the morning of 9/11 for the victims of the attacks on the World Trade Center.

[quote=RobNY]Forgive me but…

non-Catholic: I am not Catholic, Father, but I would like to be absolved.

Priest: Sorry my son, I have bad news, I cannot absolve you.

non-Catholic: …

Priest: But don’t worry, I have some good news.

non-Catholic: There’s an exception?

Priest: No. I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by switching to Geico.


In all seriousness, though. In times of grave danger, a non-Catholic who asks a priest for confession/absolution, who manifests the belief of the Church, can receive absolution, right? Or something like that?
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Nice insurance plug…As for the question, I believe you are right. I was listening to Fr. Corapi’s “how to make a good confession” fathercorapi.com/How-To-Make-a-Good-Confession—107CD-P26C3.aspx and he talks about giving conditional absolution at time of emergency like to soldiers during war or as a plane is going down to crash.

[quote=viktor aleksndr]Sacrament of reconciliation is not just reconciliation to God but also to His church, there fore if a non catholic undergo a sacrament of reconciliation he must also undergo reconciliation to the Holy Catholic Church.

I think it is more appropriate for him to talk to the priest and ask some advise than undergo a sacrament of reconciliation.
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I agree with you. At the Sacrament of Reconciliation the priest is a representative of the Church and a representative of Christ and we are reconciled to both after confessing.

This question intrigues me. What about RCIA candidates, those who have been validly bapstized in another church? Wouldn’t they need to go to Reconciliation and actually be absolved before being confirmed and taking the Eucharist?

That’s the way it worked when I was confirmed, but I wasn’t prepared in any way for first confession, didn’t really know what to do, got a perfuctory absolution, and that was it. It was, however, before the confirmation.

I descided to go to confession also before I was confirmed. I just thought it would be appropriate. But it was not one of those traditional confessions but a “reconsilation” in which the priest and I talked face to face. I was nice but I hoped for something more. How come Catholicism seems more conservative and traditonal on TV and in movies than in real life?

Peace

[quote=ChemicalBean]This question intrigues me. What about RCIA candidates, those who have been validly bapstized in another church? Wouldn’t they need to go to Reconciliation and actually be absolved before being confirmed and taking the Eucharist?
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Baptism removes all sin without the need of confession.

[quote=ChemicalBean]This question intrigues me. What about RCIA candidates, those who have been validly baptized in another church? Wouldn’t they need to go to Reconciliation and actually be absolved before being confirmed and taking the Eucharist?
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Yes! After having been Baptized for the first time, a new initiate into the Faith may recieve the sacrament of Holy Eucharest as the sacrament of Baptism has removed all their sins. Those who have been Baptized at some other time other than their entry into the Church are presumed to have committed sins since their Baptism and do stand in need of the sacrament of Confession, now more commonly referred to as the sacrament of Reconciliation. It is not entirely proper to refer to this sacrament as reconciliation for the reconciliation between God’s Justice and His people’s sins was Jesus’ Passion and Crucifixion. The reception of this reconciliation requires the penitant to CONFESS that they are a sinner, name the occasions and acts of sin, be truly sorry for having offended God and have a firm resolve to do penance and avoid sin and the near occasions of sin in the future.

[quote=Mr. Bean]I descided to go to confession also before I was confirmed. I just thought it would be appropriate. But it was not one of those traditional confessions but a “reconsilation” in which the priest and I talked face to face. I was nice but I hoped for something more. How come Catholicism seems more conservative and traditonal on TV and in movies than in real life?

Peace
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Other than for the sacrament of Baptism, which removes all sin and marks us with the sign of the Holy Spirit, Confession, and/or absolution by a priest if Confession cannot be done, is a requirement before the reception of any of the other sacraments as we must be in a state of grace free fom all mortal and venial sins.
As to why is the Church more conservative in movies and on TV, perhaps fiction today represents truth more accurately than reality.
Pray for our priests and religious.

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