Confirmation Class Error?


#1

At my Confirmation Class last Wednesday night our teacher made the statement that at Catholic Weddings and certain other events that it is ok for non-Catholics to receive Holy Communion. Is this true? I have never heard of this, and I was wondering where I could find this in the Catechism or in Canon Law.


#2

Your teacher is wrong. I’m not sure where he or she received that idea.


#3

Your teacher was in error.

1400Ecclesial communities derived from the Reformation and separated from the Catholic Church, “have not preserved the proper reality of the Eucharistic mystery in its fullness, especially because of the absence of the sacrament of Holy Orders.” It is for this reason that, for the Catholic Church, Eucharistic intercommunion with these communities is not possible. However these ecclesial communities, “when they commemorate the Lord’s death and resurrection in the Holy Supper . . . profess that it signifies life in communion with Christ and await his coming in glory.”

(From The Catechism of the Catholic Church)


#4

In 1401 below, it seems that a Biship may in a “grave” circumstance (and grave usually means life and death situation) make an allowance for non-Catholic Christians to receive, but, I cannot see how a wedding would fall under this…

1398 The Eucharist and the unity of Christians. Before the greatness of this mystery St. Augustine exclaims, *“O sacrament of devotion! O sign of unity! O bond of charity!”*237 The more painful the experience of the divisions in the Church which break the common participation in the table of the Lord, the more urgent are our prayers to the Lord that the time of complete unity among all who believe in him may return.

1399 The Eastern churches that are not in full communion with the Catholic Church celebrate the Eucharist with great love. “These Churches, although separated from us, yet possess true sacraments, above all - by apostolic succession - the priesthood and the Eucharist, whereby they are still joined to us in closest intimacy.” A certain communion in sacris, and so in the Eucharist, "given suitable circumstances and the approval of Church authority, is not merely possible but is encouraged."238

1400 Ecclesial communities derived from the Reformation and separated from the Catholic Church, "have not preserved the proper reality of the Eucharistic mystery in its fullness, especially because of the absence of the sacrament of Holy Orders."239 It is for this reason that, for the Catholic Church, Eucharistic intercommunion with these communities is not possible. However these ecclesial communities, "when they commemorate the Lord’s death and resurrection in the Holy Supper . . . profess that it signifies life in communion with Christ and await his coming in glory."240

1401 When, in the Ordinary’s judgment, a grave necessity arises, Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing of the Sick to other Christians not in full communion with the Catholic Church, who ask for them of their own will, provided they give evidence of holding the Catholic faith regarding these sacraments and possess the required dispositions.241


#5

Wrong, wrong, wrong.


#6

Is it possible you misunderstood the statement?
At several of the RCIA classes I’ve attended, when discussing this subject, I have heard the question 'What if the Preist dosn’t know and the person goes to recieve anyway?" or "What is N family member is deeply offended and goes to recieve with out anyone knowing?"
To this I have heard Preist’s reply that he would turn no one away from the table, but that it is wrong and crossing the arms for a blessing is the right thing to do.
WELCOME! and blessing in your journey, it never ends!


#7

[quote=Nick]At my Confirmation Class last Wednesday night our teacher made the statement that at Catholic Weddings and certain other events that it is ok for non-Catholics to receive Holy Communion. Is this true? I have never heard of this, and I was wondering where I could find this in the Catechism or in Canon Law.
[/quote]

You won’t find it. Because it does not exist in the Catechism or Canon Law. The Church does allow non-Catholic Baptized Christians in certain extreme circumstances where they have no access to their own pastors or are near the point of death to ask for the Catholic Sacraments. Then it allows for a Bishop to grant permission in those specific circumstances for a pastor to minister to them. This in no way applies to weddings.


#8

Your teacher must be corrected before confusing the faith of anyone else. Simply go into Church and look in the first page of the missalette - Guidlines for receiving.


#9

Speak to your priest ASAP about this.
Imparting erroneous information like that is part of what causes poor catachesis.


#10

Jimmy Akin has a blog entry on this very issue.


#11

maybe I did misunderstand my teacher. But if she ever says anything like that again, I hope I have enough courage to tell her she is wrong, I don’t know her that well, and I am not good at confrontations.


#12

Nick, I don’t know where you live but chances are, in the back of the missalette in you church, you will find the rules for the reception of Communion in the back. So, are you going to bring it up to him (respectfully, of course - chances are he’s just been educated by someone uneducated like himself) since you are a Soldier of Christ in training? :thumbsup:


#13

Peace be with you!

Here is what you should do. If you are not sure if you misunderstood what your teacher was saying, then you should ask her next time to clarify. If she does say what you think she said, then by all means CORRECT HER. Bring the materials that the other posters have recommended.

In Christ,
Rand


#14

[quote=Rand Al’Thor]Peace be with you!

Here is what you should do. If you are not sure if you misunderstood what your teacher was saying, then you should ask her next time to clarify. If she does say what you think she said, then by all means CORRECT HER. Bring the materials that the other posters have recommended.

In Christ,
Rand
[/quote]

Talk to her privately not in front of the class though. If she taught it wrong she can bring it up to the class again.


#15

Well, I spoke to my teacher privately during the break last night and told her that it is not in Canon Law that non-Catholics can receive Holy Communion at Catholic weddings and funerals, and she said “you won’t find it in Canon Law, it is just something that a priest might do on occasion to foster a spirit of community.” Then I asked her “aren’t we always required to be faithful to Canon Law?” and she said " the majority of the time, yes, but there are some occassions that fall under a ‘grey’ area and in these situations it is ok to deviate."

So after that I didn’t know what else to say. I don’t think that arguing further would have been fruitful. I am now trying to find a new Confirmation class, as this one is obviously not right for me.


#16

Nick, you sound like a wonderful young man, but I assume that you are in the eighth grade or early high school. I think that you have done all that you can do. I think that you should now involve your parents in this situation since your religious education is ultimately their responsibiliy. Ask them to speak to your pastor with you, and explain the situtation to him. Even if you and they choose another confirmation class for you, you may help the other students. It is the responsibility of the pastor to make sure that the faith is being taught correctly. If the pastor supports your teacher you and your parents should contact your bishop.


#17

Thank you Marysann, but I am 23. Why did you think that I was in the eighth grade? I better work on my writing skills, I guess.

There is no priest to complain to. At this parish where I am taking my class there is no priest pastor, there is only a pastoral coordinator who is a nun, and she was there in the room when the teacher made the comment about non-Catholics being able to receive in certain situations. So, she obviously felt there was nothing wrong about this statement. I think the best thing for me to do now is find a good priest who will take over my Confirmation process.


#18

[quote=Nick]I think the best thing for me to do now is find a good priest who will take over my Confirmation process.
[/quote]

Exactly! :thumbsup:


#19

originally posted by Nick
best thing for me to do now is find a good priest who will take over my Confirmation process.

Yes! Be proactive by all means.
This is just the latest imparting of WRONG information that I’ve read being given to catachumens and candidates.
I read yet another this morning about how an RCIA “instructor” told her class that as a Catholic, signing oneself and genuflection is a matter of choice and not necessary. :mad: Read “RCC customs what do I do?” thread in this same Apologetics forum.


#20

Didn’t Bill Clinton receive communion at JPII funeral?


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