confirmation vows

"I believe and profess all the Catholic church teaches."
It is funny how some people think this means: “I can believe or not believe what the church teaches.”…so not true.
Are we as Catholics called to be faithful to that statement, made at confirmation, for the rest of our lives? I’m tired of running into people who think the churches teachings are trivial.
Some may think I am being harsh in this forum, but one advantage of these posts is it being an outlet to release frustration with things in the church. I am taking advantage of it right now.
Any thoughts?

Justin

So many of us were confirmed as teenagers, and it is likely most of us did not really understand “all” the Church teaches, or have a clue what it means to “profess.”

And now they are confirming second graders! :eek:

I think adults coming into the church through a good RCIA program have the best chance of affirming this in the right spirit.

I guess I’m biased…I’m an RCIAer of three years ago!

Justin

i agree about not confirming younger than teenagers. i myself was just confirmed in april, and surprisingly many of my fellow classmates were extrememly dumb in the subject of catholicism…sadly to say.

i think it is sooo important for teens to continue their faith journey by researching what they DID profess in believing in. i am very grateful and blessed to have two awesome God-sent sponsors and one really swell confirmation teacher!
Sara

I would love to see high schoolers being confirmed, my son was in 6th grade - didn’t mean as much as it should have to him - but I have kept him on his toes! :smiley: BTW high school confirmation would keep children in catechesis longer- High school ministry is very optional in our town…

blessings

[quote=arnulf]So many of us were confirmed as teenagers, and it is likely most of us did not really understand “all” the Church teaches, or have a clue what it means to “profess.”

And now they are confirming second graders! :eek:

I think adults coming into the church through a good RCIA program have the best chance of affirming this in the right spirit.
[/quote]

I have the same problem in the SoBap circles I am currently (but not for long) associated with, in that they accept the “conversion” of a six-year-old who has seen a Jesus video and prayed a prayer as being valid. Don’t get me wrong; I have heard testimonies of people who were converted at that age and went on to live great Christian lives. However, based on the overwhelming numbers of people who were converted at that age and went on to become rank sinners (self included) I believe that six-year-olds aren’t really mature enough to know what they is doing. There is a good reason why Jews do the bar mitzvah at age 12-13, the same reason why Catholics used to (and should still) confirm at about the same age.

DaveBj

Confirmation was not a separate sacrament in the early Church…it was “confirming” the promises made and grace received at Baptism.
It is in understanding both the theology of the sacrament and the practical history of it that leads to the movement of restored order of the sacraments of initiation, which many dioceses in the US are moving toward, if they are not following that order to begin with.
As someone with experience in sacramental preparation programs, I have come to agree with the restored order movement. My experience has been that it does not matter if you confirm in the 3rd grade, 8th grade or 12th grade…grace is grace, just the same. Sacraments change us: change is inevitable, progress is optional.
It may take many years for young people to grow in the grace received, regardless of age. To some degree, using sacraments as “carrots” to keep youth in catechetical programs creates more problems and a lack of true interest and/or desire to grow in the faith. And if the family does not support the faith formation by creating a Catholic home, where particpation in parish programs and living a sacramental life is a priority, what good does it do to make the children come to “complete” the sacraments and then never show up again?
Just my point of view, not an expert opinion in any way,shape or form:love:

Peace…

[quote=smrn]i agree about not confirming younger than teenagers. i myself was just confirmed in april, and surprisingly many of my fellow classmates were extrememly dumb in the subject of catholicism…sadly to say.

[/quote]

I actually believe that we should not be waiting til they are teenagers to confirm. It was the original practice of the Western Church (and still the practice of the Eastern Catholic Churches) to confirm shortly after baptism. (See CCC 1290-1292)

Too many teens today see the Sacrament of Confirmation as a sort of graduation from the Church. Far too many don’t return to Mass after being confirmed. I think they need the sacramental grace of confirmation as early as possible,

James

[quote=smrn]i agree about not confirming younger than teenagers. i myself was just confirmed in april, and surprisingly many of my fellow classmates were extrememly dumb in the subject of catholicism…sadly to say.
[/quote]

I totally agree. It is really sad. I think we used the Bible a grand total of 5 times in 2 years of confirmation, and the CCC zero times. and then people wonder why the teenagers are ignorant of the Faith. (I’m not just putting the blame on bad teachers. We have the responsibility to learn from other resources if teachers aren’t doing their jobs.)

“I actually believe that we should not be waiting til they are teenagers to confirm. It was the original practice of the Western Church (and still the practice of the Eastern Catholic Churches) to confirm shortly after baptism. (See CCC 1290-1292)”

I know what you are saying about how we used to do things. However, confirmation by the sacramental word itself means to confirm in the faith that you we baptized in. You had no control over Baptism, now as teens you can choose to continue your life with God and recieve even more graces from Him. I am aware of children being converted and recieving the three initiation sacraments all at one time.
For me it really helped to make my Confirmation as a teenager, for the reason that it was my chance to voice what I firmly believe in.
-Sara

For pro-life teen…parents are the primary educators of their children in all areas of life, including their faith. It is very sad that in many cases they are not prepared to do so. Teachers in Catholic schools and catechists in faith formation programs can only do so much…when it’s not reinforced at home, it is sometimes like this :banghead: …and then, of course many of them disappear, because they feel they have learned all they need to know about their faith. Perhaps young people like yourselves will be better prepared to nurture faith development in your families, when you have them.
:amen:

But these words are not said at Confirmation - only in the profession of faith said by people entering the Catholic Church through RCIA. Perhaps these words should be said by confirmation candidates! Then we would make sure they understood exactly what the church teaches.

Very ancient thread. Not that I mind, but there are some who do.

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