Confirmed by Pastor?


#1

Well, as we all may have heard, my experience with RCIA was a little… haphazard. I was Baptized, Confirmed, and given my First Communion all at the same mass, all by the parish priest, with my sponsor in attendance.

My question is this: I recently read in the Catechism that only a Bishop may Confirm the confermandi. Does this invalidate my confirmation or does an exemption exist in the case of RCIA?


#2

It does not invalidate your confirmation. While in the Latin rite, the bishop is the primary celebrant of confirmation, he can delegate the task to priests. Especially if you were baptised/confirmed at the Easter vigil, this is the norm, since obviously the bishop can’t be at every parish on the same night.


#3

some relevant canons, if you were looking for references:

THE MINISTER OF CONFIRMATION

Can. 882 The ordinary minister of confirmation is a bishop; a presbyter (a priest) provided with this faculty in virtue of universal law or the special grant of the competent authority also confers this sacrament validly.

Can. 883 The following possess the faculty of administering confirmation by the law itself:

1/ within the boundaries of their jurisdiction, those who are equivalent in law to a diocesan bishop;

2/ as regards the person in question, the presbyter (a priest) who by virtue of office or mandate of the diocesan bishop baptizes one who is no longer an infant or admits one already baptized into the full communion of the Catholic Church;


#4

Canon gives the priest who baptizes an adult the power to also confirm him/her, unless the bishop has specifically reserved it to himself.

Can. 883 The following possess the faculty of administering confirmation by the law itself:

1/ within the boundaries of their jurisdiction, those who are equivalent in law to a diocesan bishop;

2/ as regards the person in question, the presbyter who by virtue of office or mandate of the diocesan bishop baptizes one who is no longer an infant or admits one already baptized into the full communion of the Catholic Church;


#5

(At least in the United States) pastors my baptize, confirm, and give First Communion at the Easter Vigil.

At other times of the year confirmation must be administered by the bishop (unless the bishop delegates special permission to a pastor to confirm at another time of the year.)


#6

Canon law gives the priest who baptizes an adult or receives somebody into full communion the faculty to baptize them regardless of when it happens.


#7

No exemption is needed since what you described is the norm. Confirmation immediately follows baptism and the priest may confirm.

RCIA 215. In accord with the ancient practice followed in the Roman liturgy, adults are not to be baptized without receiving confirmation immediately afterward, unless some serious reason stands in the way. The conjunction of the two celebrations signifies the unity of the paschal mystery, the close link between the mission of the Son and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, and the connection between the two sacraments through which the Son and the Holy Spirit come with the Father to those who are baptized.

RCIA 232. If the bishop has conferred baptism, he should now also confer confirmation. If the bishop is not present, the priest who conferred baptism is authorized to confirm.


#8

There is an exemption in the case of RCIA.


#9

It is my understanding that the chrism used has been blessed by the bishop. For some reason when I was initially interviewed for confirmation, that a bishop would have to do it. I was not given reasons why, I just thought it was because I was the oldest in the class?


#10

I was confirmed by my parish priest shortly after the bishop of the diocese had a stroke. Because times for Confirmations couldn’t be switched to a later date, the priest simply confirmed the class.


#11

The bishop simply gave the priests of his diocese the faculty to confirm their parishioners as necessary. When we were without a bishop for a while the priest who was in charge of the diocese imposed confirmation.


#12

The Chrism, the Oil of Catechumen and the Oil of the Sick are blessed by the bishop at the Chrism Mass on Holy Thursday – or at some point close to Easter. In our diocese it’s not feasible to celebrate that Mass on Holy Thursday because the travelling distances are too great for the priests to attend and to return to their parishes for the Mass of the Lord’s Supper later that day.

At the Mass of Chrism, the Pastors or their delegates, get some of each oil to take back to their parishes.

The Confirmation of Catholics belongs to the Bishop of the diocese in which they live.

The Confirmation of baptized Christians being received into full communion or adults being baptized belongs to the priest who receives them or baptizes them.


#13

In my archdiocese, we have our Chrism Mass on the Monday of Holy Week. Since everyone in the archdiocese is welcome to attend, our cathedral is always standing room only. :slight_smile:


#14

For converts, canon law delegates a priest to perform Confirmation.

The bishop is the ordinary minister of Confirmation. A priest is an extraordinary minister of Confirmation. Byzantine priests confirm all the time.

Only a bishop or priest has the sacramental ability to confirm. A deacon does not have the ability to confirm.


closed #15

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