Confirmed into another Church


#1

Just a quick question:

I was baptised and confirmed into the Anglican Church. My Priest told me that my baptism will just need verification, but he didn't say anything about the confirmation. Is that just over-written when I get confirmed as a Catholic?


#2

The Catholic Church does not recognize the validity of Anglican orders or Anglican confirmation. You will need to be confirmed in the Catholic Church.


#3

While baptisms in other churches are generally accepted you still need to be CONFIRMED into the Catholic faith. Confirmation is a process where you make a commitment into the faith - and yes in a sense it is overwritten over the confirmation into the Anglican church (or as our Bishop calls it - Catholic lite/ just a bit of Catholic humor)


#4

I wad baptized and confirmed in June1965.
I was born april 1965. Can newborns be
Confirmed? What is confirmation?
:blush:


#5

Calling confirmation “a process where you make a commitment into the faith” doesn’t do justice to the significance of the sacrament. In the sacrament of confirmation, one receives the gift of the Holy Spirit.


#6

Confirmation is the sacrament in which one receives the gift of the Holy Spirit. Although newborns are generally not confirmed in the Roman Catholic Church, if there is a danger of death, they can be. In the Eastern Catholic Churches (at least those in the Byzantine tradition), it is our tradition to baptize, chrismate (confirm), and admit infants to Holy Communion.


#7

[quote="yukonbrad, post:3, topic:297591"]
While baptisms in other churches are generally accepted you still need to be CONFIRMED into the Catholic faith. Confirmation is a process where you make a commitment into the faith - and yes in a sense it is overwritten over the confirmation into the Anglican church (or as our Bishop calls it - Catholic lite/ just a bit of Catholic humor)

[/quote]

Thank you, I was just checking that I didn't have to do anything extra because I had been confirmed into the Anglican communion. So is baptism the only sacrament recognized as validly administered outside of the Catholic Church?


#8

[quote="CuriousAndy, post:7, topic:297591"]
Thank you, I was just checking that I didn't have to do anything extra because I had been confirmed into the Anglican communion. So is baptism the only sacrament recognized as validly administered outside of the Catholic Church?

[/quote]

Marriage as well, where both parties are baptized and are free to marry.

Also, the Catholic Church recognizes the validity of all the sacraments among the Eastern Orthodox, the Oriental Orthodox, and the Assyrian Church of the East.


#9

[quote="RyanBlack, post:6, topic:297591"]
Confirmation is the sacrament in which one receives the gift of the Holy Spirit. Although newborns are generally not confirmed in the Roman Catholic Church, if there is a danger of death, they can be. In the Eastern Catholic Churches (at least those in the Byzantine tradition), it is our tradition to baptize, chrismate (confirm), and admit infants to Holy Communion.

[/quote]

Ryan, an interesting anomaly: Many Hispanics from Mexico and Central America receive all three sacraments as infants. I don't know why, since they are in fact Latin Catholics. This has come up numerous times in RCIA, marriage prep, and religious education.

Seeing Yessinia's name and location perhaps this explains her experience.


#10

[quote="1ke, post:9, topic:297591"]
Ryan, an interesting anomaly: Many Hispanics from Mexico and Central America receive all three sacraments as infants. I don't know why, since they are in fact Latin Catholics. This has come up numerous times in RCIA, marriage prep, and religious education.

[/quote]

Was it common for infants to receive all three sacraments in Spain prior to the Council of Trent?

I have heard that pre-16th Century Catholic customs and practices still play a big part in Latin American Catholicism (whether they should or not.)


#11

[quote="1ke, post:9, topic:297591"]
Ryan, an interesting anomaly: Many Hispanics from Mexico and Central America receive all three sacraments as infants. I don't know why, since they are in fact Latin Catholics. This has come up numerous times in RCIA, marriage prep, and religious education.

[/quote]

I believe each Bishop sets the minimum age in their diocese for Confirmation so perhaps in Mexico there is no minimum as there are in the US? I also don't think there is anything in Canon Law the specifically prohibits someone under the age of reason from receiving the Eucharist, is there? So even though they are Latin Rite they may be doing nothing illicit. It is interestng though to learn about the different traditions in the Church.


#12

[quote="TheDoctor, post:11, topic:297591"]
I believe each Bishop sets the minimum age in their diocese for Confirmation so perhaps in Mexico there is no minimum as there are in the US? I also don't think there is anything in Canon Law the specifically prohibits someone under the age of reason from receiving the Eucharist, is there? So even though they are Latin Rite they may be doing nothing illicit. It is interestng though to learn about the different traditions in the Church.

[/quote]

In the Latin Rite, yes, there are canons regarding reception of the Eucharist and Confirmation and both require use of reason (excepting danger of death):

Can. 913 §1. The administration of the Most Holy Eucharist to children requires that they have sufficient knowledge and careful preparation so that they understand the mystery of Christ according to their capacity and are able to receive the body of Christ with faith and devotion.

§2. The Most Holy Eucharist, however, can be administered to children in danger of death if they can distinguish the body of Christ from ordinary food and receive communion reverently.

Can. 889 §1. Every baptized person not yet confirmed and only such a person is capable of receiving confirmation.

§2. To receive confirmation licitly outside the danger of death requires that a person who has the use of reason be suitably instructed, properly disposed, and able to renew the baptismal promises.

Can. 890 The faithful are obliged to receive this sacrament at the proper time. Parents and pastors of souls, especially pastors of parishes, are to take care that the faithful are properly instructed to receive the sacrament and come to it at the appropriate time.

Can. 891 The sacrament of confirmation is to be conferred on the faithful at about the age of discretion unless the conference of bishops has determined another age, or there is danger of death, or in the judgment of the minister a grave cause suggests otherwise.


#13

[quote="1ke, post:12, topic:297591"]
In the Latin Rite, yes, there are canons regarding reception of the Eucharist and Confirmation and both require use of reason (excepting danger of death):

Can. 913 §1. The administration of the Most Holy Eucharist to children requires that they have sufficient knowledge and careful preparation so that they understand the mystery of Christ according to their capacity and are able to receive the body of Christ with faith and devotion.

§2. The Most Holy Eucharist, however, can be administered to children in danger of death if they can distinguish the body of Christ from ordinary food and receive communion reverently.

Can. 889 §1. Every baptized person not yet confirmed and only such a person is capable of receiving confirmation.

§2. To receive confirmation licitly outside the danger of death requires that a person who has the use of reason be suitably instructed, properly disposed, and able to renew the baptismal promises.

Can. 890 The faithful are obliged to receive this sacrament at the proper time. Parents and pastors of souls, especially pastors of parishes, are to take care that the faithful are properly instructed to receive the sacrament and come to it at the appropriate time.

Can. 891 The sacrament of confirmation is to be conferred on the faithful at about the age of discretion unless the conference of bishops has determined another age, or there is danger of death, or in the judgment of the minister a grave cause suggests otherwise.

[/quote]

Thanks for looking it up. Much stranger then that the Bishops would allow this (if i is that common they must know about it) which clearly seems to be opposed to Canon Law. Perhaps as some have alluded to it is a long standing tradition that no one wants to challenge?


#14

[quote="YESSENIA1, post:4, topic:297591"]
I wad baptized and confirmed in June1965.
I was born april 1965. Can newborns be
Confirmed? What is confirmation?
:blush:

[/quote]

In Eastern Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches baptism and chrismation are given at the same time.

Confirmation is the western name for chrismation.


#15

How many Catholic churches are there?
Catholic, catholic, catholic???????
Blah,Blah,Blah ...Borinnnnnnggggg!!
East,west,orthy byziney.la la la.penty.
Angely...ONE GOD!! jesus wrote catachism???
Who wrote canon law and everything else
Jesus or MAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!


#16

[quote="1ke, post:9, topic:297591"]
Ryan, an interesting anomaly: Many Hispanics from Mexico and Central America receive all three sacraments as infants. I don't know why, since they are in fact Latin Catholics. This has come up numerous times in RCIA, marriage prep, and religious education.

Seeing Yessinia's name and location perhaps this explains her experience.

[/quote]

It may be danger of death. As a general rule, Catholic children in danger of death due to sickness or injury should receive the Sacrament of Confirmation according to CIC Canons 889.2, and 891. In this case of danger of death CIC Canon 883.3 allows any priest the faculty of conferring Confirmation, usually given by the Bishop.


#17

[quote="YESSENIA1, post:15, topic:297591"]
How many Catholic churches are there?
Catholic, catholic, catholic???????
Blah,Blah,Blah ...Borinnnnnnggggg!!
East,west,orthy byziney.la la la.penty.
Angely...ONE GOD!! jesus wrote catachism???
Who wrote canon law and everything else
Jesus or MAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[/quote]

:confused:

I'm not sure if you are actually asking a question but there are 23 Catholic Churches in communion with Rome.


#18

No, I am not talking about danger of death.


#19

[quote="1ke, post:18, topic:297591"]
No, I am not talking about danger of death.

[/quote]

CIC Can. 889 §1 is fulfilled but Can. 889 §2 does not apply, having been baptized infants without the use of reason. Can. 891 allows an age change besides danger of death when "a grave reason suggests otherwise." So then if the age is lowered for a reason Can. 890 proper time is fulfilled, but then there will be no instruction. It seems that the grave reason overrides the prescription of prior catechesis, especially since is is normal in Eastern Catholic churches (so it is not a matter of divine law). Can. 889
§1 Every baptised person who is not confirmed, and only such a person, is capable of receiving confirmation.
§2 Apart from the danger of death, to receive confirmation lawfully a person who has the use of reason must be suitably instructed, properly disposed and able to renew the baptismal promises.

Can. 890
The faithful are bound to receive this sacrament at the proper time. Parents and pastors of souls, especially parish priests, are to see that the faithful are properly instructed to receive the sacrament and come to it at the opportune time.

Can. 891
The sacrament of confirmation is to be conferred on the faithful at about the age of discretion, unless the Episcopal Conference has decided on a different age, or there is a danger of death or, in the judgement of the minister, a grave reason suggests otherwise.


#20

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