Confiteor and Roman Canon are fading out of use

Half the time I go to mass the confiteor isn’t said, but some other shortened thing. Sometimes it’s like the priest just makes it up.
90% of the time I go to mass it is EP 2 which is so incredibly short.

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The Confiteor is said at a super majority of the masses I attend. The Roman Canon is typically used on solemnities in my parish.

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I use the Confiteor daily and the Roman Canon about a third of the time. Not fading out where I’m at.

-Fr ACEGC

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Confiteor is said at a majority of the masses at my parish. The Roman Canon is very common to hear as well. It’s definitely heard at my parish when we have the Ordinary Form said in Latin.

I’ve heard them at other masses in my area and in multiple states I’ve traveled through. So I don’t think either are dying out.

I hear the Confiteor a few times a week, and the Roman Canon at every big major OF Mass.

Depends on who is saying mass, I know some priests that always say the Confiteor, some who do it sometimes, and some who don’t do it much

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In my parish, the Confiteor is used almost exclusively since our new Administrator was appointed. He uses the Roman Canon on major feast.

In French Canada where the missalette of choice is the “Prions en Eglise”, the Confiteor is not even included in the weekly issue of the missalette and only one of the EPs plus one of the EPs for Children is included. I don’t recall a priest using anything but the EP in the missalette, last Sunday that was EP II, and I think the last time I heard the Confiteor in French was at Notre Dame in Paris back in 2013.

Most times I hear this " you were sent to heal the contrite of heart" or “Have mercy on us Lord”.

I really don’t mind, just don’t get why can’t just say the confiteor. But must just be the parishes I tend to go too.

What you’re mentioning are, of course, legitimate options, but like the others, my experience isn’t that they’re fading but rather making a comeback. The Confiteor and Roman Canon are almost exclusively used on Sundays and Solemnities around here - and often more frequently. It’s becoming rare not to hear them. This is just within the last 5 years or so that I’ve noticed this.

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It’s said every single time at a tlm. At my local OF parish two of the three priests would say it, the pastor never said it. It’s too bad but I think he had too much on his plate and unfortunately his masses always felt very rushed. All three would include some things and leave out others so that each was different. It’s a big reason why I stopped going to OF masses. It all felt very haphazard.

I know I’ve never heard anything like the canon at my local parish’s OF mass.

So that means that at half the Masses you go to the Confiteor is said .

That’s hardly fading out of use .

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It’s been years since I’ve heard the Confiteor at Mass, and I’ve gone to a variety of churches in several states.

It’s also the norm where I live. In fact, I can’t remember the last time I went to a Mass where the confiteor wasn’t used…

My local pastor does typically use EPII, BUT he chants the entire preface and EP. On particularly solemn Sundays (Christmas or Easter or Pentecost etc), he chants EPI.

At our cathedral, EPI is often used for the solemn 11 AM Mass. EPII or III may be used for other Masses. Either way, the Roman Canon is definitely not forgotten.

I guess there is one advantage of having forums such as this, and that is that people can carp on line instead of “Father, I don’t like it when you…” or “Father, why don’t you… instead of …”

If nothing else, it reduces the number of people who tell him to his face what they don’t like.
There are approximately 17,000 parishes in the US, and for the greater majority of people, there is at least one, if not a multitude of other parishes at which they can attend Mass. Out of a minority of parishes, there are legitimate complaints; far more often it is just something someone doesn’t like.

And the likelihood is there are a far greater majority of people in the parish who either feel the opposite, or it is a matter which they really don’t care one way or the other.

Hooray for the internet, which allows people to vent, thus providing a minor relief to the poor priest, who catches hell from enough people already. These men try to follow Jesus, and try to bring Jesus to us. If we don’t like what is going on, we can make a bit of effort and go to Mass somewhere else; and if we are not willing to do that, then perhaps we can live with it - and as my grandmother would say to me decades ago, offer it up for the poor souls in purgatory.

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At my current parish it isn’t fading out either. Some years ago, a priest for whom I was honored to be a sacristan for, only said EP II because he had eyesight issues, and I’m guessing he had this particular EP committed to memory! It was word for word perfect :slight_smile:

Obviously. There are none of these optioms in the EF. And the Confiteor is longer too.

My parish uses the confiteor every Sunday and I use the Canon on High Days and holy days. As for the rest of the time, the missal allows some leeway to the priest when it comes to the penitential rite. The confiteor is one option while invocation+Lord Have Mercy/Christ Have Mercy is another.

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It sounds as though your priest has a problem. Bear with him - priests are in short supply.

In the UK, many parishes use the Sunday Mass sheets printed by Redemptorist Publications. These tend to rotate the various Penitential Rites and Eucharistic Prayers, as well as the Prefaces for the Sundays of Ordinary Time. The priest is not obliged to follow the Mass sheet, but there tends to be a lot of paper rustling if he doesn’t. We have one priest who thinks Eucharistic Prayer II is not appropriate for Sundays and says III when II is in the Mass sheet.

At weekday Masses, Eucharistic Prayers II or III tend to be the norm although the alternative Prefaces and Eucharistic Prayers for Reconciliation are often used during Lent.

The Confiteor has made a tremendous comeback in the last 20 years. Around here it’s almost always used. I think the new translation back in 2011 accelerated it’s comeback, although I have little to base that on.

I keep hoping the Roman Canon will make a similiar comeback. Alas, it hasn’t. I hear it used very rarely.

Fr, do you use the Roman Canon on weekday masses?

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