Conflicts With Mass Attendance


#1

Okay, this may be a bit of a rant.

I grew up in the southeast and nobody ever scheduled anything on Sunday mornings…other than church activities. A few years ago we left the southeast and moved to south Florida (love south Florida and yes geographically it’s certainly “southeastern” but it’s not like Alabama, Georgia, TN, etc.) and now that my children are older and playing travel lacrosse or doing competitive cheer it seems that it’s common to have games or practices scheduled on Sunday morning.

Is it common in other areas of the country to have so many games, practices, tournaments, competitions scheduled on Sunday morning?

I guess it’s a pet peeve of mine but why in the world would folks schedule childrens activities on Sunday morning? I bet mass or church attendance where I now live is somewhat less than in Alabama where I grew up but there is still a significant portion of the community that worships on Sunday morning.

Fortunately where ever we end up playing lacrosse, wrestling or cheering there has always been a church nearby which as mass on Saturday’s or early on Sunday but I still don’t see the need for so many activities to be scheduled for Sunday morning.

So, does anyone else have similar experiences with their childrens activities being scheduled for Sunday morning?


#2

There's a lot of that in my current area. I think it's a horrible idea.

But then, in my home area when I was a kid, nobody ever scheduled sports practices or games on Sunday or on Wednesday night, because so many local churches did a Wednesday night service! (Which is why choir practice and a lot of other Catholic meetings and activities for kids ended up scheduled on Wednesday night also.... Saved scheduling conflicts.)

Now... nobody seems to have a problem scheduling stuff on Wednesday nights, either. At the name of sports teams, every calendar must bow.


#3

[quote="Mintaka, post:2, topic:238458"]
There's a lot of that in my current area. I think it's a horrible idea.

But then, in my home area when I was a kid, nobody ever scheduled sports practices or games on Sunday or on Wednesday night, because so many local churches did a Wednesday night service! (Which is why choir practice and a lot of other Catholic meetings and activities for kids ended up scheduled on Wednesday night also.... Saved scheduling conflicts.)

Now... nobody seems to have a problem scheduling stuff on Wednesday nights, either. At the name of sports teams, every calendar must bow.

[/quote]

I forgot about Wednesday nights. When I coached my sons little league team a few years ago in Georgia there was no way we would have had a Wednesday night practice. Most of the families were Southern Baptist and Wednesday nights were very important church nights.

It does seem that every calendar must bow to youth sports.....sadly. I love sports but sheesh, it has gotten out of hand.


#4

It is a subtle attempt by the evil one to break down your Sabbath.

Do not give in. Fight for your children's eternal life.


#5

Well, it isn’t so subtle.

Thank you for the encouraging words.


#6

I think we live such hectic lifestyles nowadays that Sunday morning is probably the only day most kids can go to games. ie parents aren't working overtime and most don't go to church.

I actually go to church saturday evening because the only good aerobics class I can go to is Sunday morning. During the week, my job demands too much for me to catch the aerobics class.

I think it is just a sad consequence of our over hectic lifestyle.

CM


#7

A friend of mine recently moved from Georgia to south Florida. According to him, “Florida is the only place from which you have to travel north in order to go to the South.”


#8

Be grateful that as Catholics we have options for Mass times. Other kids/families are probably just missing church period.

The only way to stop this is for enough people to complain and not attend these practices or games. Of course, that means that your child may be left off the team, or not have the option to play as much. That is the choice we make when we want to stand up for something.


#9

I totally agree with you. Here, in Southern California, nobody bats an eye at sports practices and games on Sundays. We used to tell our kids that they could not participate in sports that have regular games/practices on Sundays. That ruled out Little League where we live, but kept flag football and soccer. Now, we’ve relaxed the rule a little bit by allowing one son to play in a “select” soccer league that has games on Sunday afternoons, but no mornings. (Of course, they lost just about every game, so maybe God is telling us something – lol).

It’s a real shame. When I was an evangelical, it would have been worse, since there was only one service choice at my church. Now, as a Catholic, it is easier to fit it in, or even make it a priority, because we can go late on Saturday, early on Sunday, or late on Sunday.

But, I agree. We are too, too busy, and too, too in love with sports.


#10

I agree 100%. My DS’ league had baseball tryouts on Sunday morning this year. I kindly told the league that we wouldn’t be attending anything other than church on Sunday mornings. They placed him on a team without him trying out.


#11

I don’t want to sound like the priest I loved dearly, but is now with Jesus, but if you really want to go to mass you will. Unless you are in an isolated location with one church and one Sunday Mass, which is rare, there is mass on Saturday evenings, and in large churches Sunday mass runs all day and until the early evening.

Sunday morning baseball I don’t see as a violation of sabbath because it is family time, and not work. It is no different than Dad grilling hot dogs, is he working?, of course not. It is about fun and entertainment for the family. God be with you.

His servant


#12

That was a nice move.

As I watch kids and parents get consumed by the sports mania in our suburb it makes me crazy. There is so much more to life. It is seriously so over the top that I now borrow from a phrase coined by Karl Marx and changed it a little.

Sports is the opiate for the masses. Religion is the antidote.


#13

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