Confused, need clarification plz

Hi,
I was baptized Catholic as a baby but not raised in the faith. I'm in RCIA now and will be entering the Church at Easter.
I was reading on another Catholic forum that you have to pay for some Sacraments like Baptism (which I already had), Confirmation, etc. Is this true? If so, how much is it?
I'm thinking it's probably not true, but I'm such a newbie, I could be wrong.
If it's true, I have to somehow save money that I don't have (we're paycheck to paycheck here).
Can someone please help me out here and let me know what that is all about?

We never have to pay for sacraments.

Often when families have children baptized they may have to pay for the materials used in the preparation, just like families have to pay for the materials for their children's religious education. They may also opt to give the priest a small stipend as a 'thank you' but there is no obligation to do so if you can't afford it.

Rachel,

They cannot make you pay directly for any spiritual good, like a sacrament. It is against divine law, and would be called "simony". What you probably encountered was something else, like that while a child is in a confirmation class, they may go on a retreat, and the retreat costs money for food and lodging. Or that a couple is getting married, and the pastor asks for a stipend to cover the associated costs to the parish, like for the wine that will be used during the nuptial mass. A pastor is required to see that such fees stay within locally set boundaries, and that the poor are not deprived in any way on the account of fees.

In RCIA, all the parishes I know of do not charge in any way. The place a fee is more common is in association with a child who is in a confirmation class.

[quote="Rachel, post:1, topic:184131"]
Hi,
I was baptized Catholic as a baby but not raised in the faith. I'm in RCIA now and will be entering the Church at Easter.
I was reading on another Catholic forum that you have to pay for some Sacraments like Baptism (which I already had), Confirmation, etc. Is this true? If so, how much is it?
I'm thinking it's probably not true, but I'm such a newbie, I could be wrong.
If it's true, I have to somehow save money that I don't have (we're paycheck to paycheck here).
Can someone please help me out here and let me know what that is all about?

[/quote]

NO it is strictly forbidden to request payment for any Sacrament, it is even required that nothing be done that might suggest this, that there be no possibility of confusion about this.

[quote="Rachel, post:1, topic:184131"]
Hi,
I was baptized Catholic as a baby but not raised in the faith. I'm in RCIA now and will be entering the Church at Easter.
I was reading on another Catholic forum that you have to pay for some Sacraments like Baptism (which I already had), Confirmation, etc. Is this true? If so, how much is it?
I'm thinking it's probably not true, but I'm such a newbie, I could be wrong.
If it's true, I have to somehow save money that I don't have (we're paycheck to paycheck here).
Can someone please help me out here and let me know what that is all about?

[/quote]

no it is not true and if anyone connected with the parish tells you there is a fee, contact the pastor immediately because they are speaking falsely.

a donation is always accepted and at one time such donations, or stipends, were all the parish priest had to live on. Even today where many deacons are retired a donation for their services is expected as that is a great part of their retirement income. But they are donations, not required.

What you might be asked to pay for are incidentals connected with preparing for sacraments--book, bible, course materials, help with snacks, although many parishes are able to provide these. Our adult candidates pay nothing although many choose to donate to cover what amounts to at least $100 in books and other costs of the program (not counting salaries and overhead).

There might also be a cost for using the church for a wedding if it is outside the time for a regularly scheduled Mass, to cover overhead, a/c, janitorial etc.

this is a great question to bring up in your RCIA class since others might have the same concerns.

Welcome Home!

In our parish we do not charge anything for the RCIA people. Don't worry. Ask your RCIA sponsor or any member of the RCIA team.

When we receive sacraments in the Church, outside of Easter, for example a Baptism of a baby, or for a Marriage ceremony, it is customary to offer the priest a stipend for his services but it is what you feel you can give. There isn't a menu of services and prices (at least there shouldn't be)

Enough about that, I want to take a minute to welcome you home. You were away for far too long and we missed you. I pray that you find welcome and peace in your parish home. Welcome, Welcome, a thousand welcomes! :):):)

For the sake of truth we should tell the newcomers/ newly returned, that in fact some pastors of some churches do in essence charge for some sacraments, using such excuses as "covering expenses" to make sacraments be an income stream for the church. As noted above this is terribly wrong of the pastors to do, but they can get away with it if no one challenges them. The origin of the term "simony" for this practice has to do with a magician named Simon who asked the disciples if he could pay them to teach him how to do the miracles they were doing. They got very angry with him, which surprised him, because usually people do not get angry when you offer them money. This is a lesson some of our clergy need to review. I don't remember the chapter, but it is in Acts.

If anyone does encounter a pastor who has so far forgotten his pastoral duties as to attempt to charge for a sacrament, I think it is Christian charity to correct him.

Here is a relevant passage from canon law:Can. 848 The minister is to seek nothing for the administration of the sacraments beyond the offerings defined by competent authority, always taking care that the needy are not deprived of the assistance of the sacraments because of poverty.

Thank you for all your answers!
I want to clarify this was NOT my parish that said this, it was some other forum.
I went there just looking around and ran across a thread where they were discussing the "going rate" for baptism and confirmation.
So here's another question in relation to this.
My husband and I were married in 2005, outside, in a pagan ceremony... needless to say our marriage is not technically valid at this point, so we have to have our marriage blessed before I can have Sacraments, so do I have to pay for this?
We're not doing anything fancy or anything, not inviting anyone, no party or anything like that, just making our marriage valid in the quickest, shortest, easiest amount of time... will that cost something?
BTW, if you get a chance, pray for my husband, he's still pagan and has been having a difficult time with the spiritual changes I'm going through.

[quote="Rachel, post:9, topic:184131"]
Thank you for all your answers!
I want to clarify this was NOT my parish that said this, it was some other forum.
I went there just looking around and ran across a thread where they were discussing the "going rate" for baptism and confirmation.
So here's another question in relation to this.
My husband and I were married in 2005, outside, in a pagan ceremony... needless to say our marriage is not technically valid at this point, so we have to have our marriage blessed before I can have Sacraments, so do I have to pay for this?
We're not doing anything fancy or anything, not inviting anyone, no party or anything like that, just making our marriage valid in the quickest, shortest, easiest amount of time... will that cost something?
BTW, if you get a chance, pray for my husband, he's still pagan and has been having a difficult time with the spiritual changes I'm going through.

[/quote]

No, there is no fee. After you receive a dispensation from the Bishop you will be able to exchange vows in the Church office since it will not be a Sacrament.

[quote="Br.Rich_SFO, post:10, topic:184131"]
No, there is no fee. After you receive a dispensation from the Bishop you will be able to exchange vows in the Church office since it will not be a Sacrament.

[/quote]

How do I get a dispensation from the Bishop? I didn't know I had to do that.. is that something that can be denied?

[quote="Rachel, post:11, topic:184131"]
How do I get a dispensation from the Bishop? I didn't know I had to do that.. is that something that can be denied?

[/quote]

First let me say that this comment arose because you said your husband was 'still a pagan." For most of us that implies that he is not baptized. If, OTOH, he is like you were, a non-practicing baptized Catholic or non-Catholic then the term 'pagan' would not apply.

If he isn't baptized, you, a Catholic, need a dispensation to marry him. While it can be refused (what would be the point of having such a requirement if it couldn't be denied) it isn't usually because the priest who requests it for you will only do so if you promise to do everything in your power to raise any children you might have in the Catholic Church and if he can say that marrying a non-baptized person will not cause you to abandon your Catholic Faith. I think many people don't realize that this is a requirement because Fr. does all the paperwork and they only see the end result.

[quote="Rachel, post:11, topic:184131"]
How do I get a dispensation from the Bishop? I didn't know I had to do that.. is that something that can be denied?

[/quote]

Every Catholic who wishes to Marry a non-Baptized person must request a Dispensation from Canon Law from their Bishop. This is usually done for them by the priest who is taking care of their Marriage preparation. Canon Law specifically makes a Marrige attempt between a Catholic and a non-Baptized person automatically invalid. The Dispensation permits the Marriage to be valid. It could be denied if your pastor or the Bishop feel that the Marriage is a danger to your faith. (rare) Most non-Baptized (non-Chistians) who seek to Marry a Catholic after they go through the Marriage preparation process, understand the obligations of a Catholic to practice their Faith and Baptize and raise their children Catholic.

I don't know what OTOH is?
Also, my husband was baptized in a baptist church when he was a kid (I have the certificate), he has since become pagan w/atheist leanings.
The good news is that he's went to Mass with me once, so I know God is working on him.

I will pray for him and you. Hurray for you both!

[quote="Rachel, post:14, topic:184131"]
I don't know what OTOH is?

[/quote]

OTOH On The Other Hand. Not Catholic doctrine related, just computer speak. I don't know if we actually save any time or effort with these abbreviations.

[quote="Rachel, post:14, topic:184131"]
I don't know what OTOH is?
Also, my husband was baptized in a baptist church when he was a kid (I have the certificate), he has since become pagan w/atheist leanings.
The good news is that he's went to Mass with me once, so I know God is working on him.

[/quote]

This is why details are so important and we on the other side of these computer screen do the best we can but can interpret information incorrectly.

The Bishops permission (not dispensation) is required for a Catholic to Marry an Baptized non-Catholic. This permission is more easily obtained by the priest preparing the couple for Marriage and this Marriage would be a Sacrament. So hopefully you will be working with someone at your local parish on the Marriage preparation ans these things will be taken care of in due time.

[quote="Br.Rich_SFO, post:17, topic:184131"]
This is why details are so important and we on the other side of these computer screen do the best we can but can interpret information incorrectly.

The Bishops permission (not dispensation) is required for a Catholic to Marry an Baptized non-Catholic. This permission is more easily obtained by the priest preparing the couple for Marriage and this Marriage would be a Sacrament. So hopefully you will be working with someone at your local parish on the Marriage preparation ans these things will be taken care of in due time.

[/quote]

In some dioceses, such as mine, the bishop has given the responsibility for granting permission to the priests.

[quote="Br.Rich_SFO, post:17, topic:184131"]
This is why details are so important and we on the other side of these computer screen do the best we can but can interpret information incorrectly.

The Bishops permission (not dispensation) is required for a Catholic to Marry an Baptized non-Catholic. This permission is more easily obtained by the priest preparing the couple for Marriage and this Marriage would be a Sacrament. So hopefully you will be working with someone at your local parish on the Marriage preparation ans these things will be taken care of in due time.

[/quote]

Sorry about that, I'm new to all of this, I wasn't aware those where things needed to be told. I know know though :) thanks!

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