Consecration question.


#1

This is for all you good folks out there who are much more knowlegeable about the liturgy than I.

One of the priests at my parish has a slight variation at the preparation of the gifts.

The prayer is supposed to be something like:

P: “Pray my brothers and sisters that our sacrifice may be acceptable to God the almighty Father.”

R: "May the Lord accept this sacrifice at your hands…

Our priest says something like…

P:"Pray sisters and brothers that this sacrifice of bread and wine, and the many sacrifices of our daily life be acceptable gifts…

Can he add “us” in there like that? Doesn’t seem right.


#2

No, he should read what is printed.


#3

He should conform to the standard invocations as celebrated all over the world. To do otherwise is an improvisation and clearly an ego trip on the priest’s part. He sounds a bit like a maverick.


#4

Thanks for the info.

But to be fair, he’s not a maverick. He’s very sincere and ususally quite orthodox. I think maybe he just doesn’t know.

With that in mind, any suggestions on how to bring his attention to it in the kindest way possible?


#5

Sorry, can’t help. It looks like it will be up to you since you have a close perspective.


#6

From the information you have given, he is indeed a maverick. Of course he knows - all priests do.

There is probably no “kind” way to bring his attention to it - he is doing it deliberately, since priests are supposed to read the words, not make them up as they go along. It is also likely that speaking about it will only bring you grief - he will not take correction well and be annoyed with you.


#7

You said it best. You are standing up for the Faith, thank you.


#8

I’m sorry but where did Ft. add “us”?


#9

Give him a copy of this:

Redemptionis Sacramentum [51.] Only those Eucharistic Prayers are to be used which are found in the Roman Missal or are legitimately approved by the Apostolic See, and according to the manner and the terms set forth by it. “It is not to be tolerated that some Priests take upon themselves the right to compose their own Eucharistic Prayers”[129] or to change the same texts approved by the Church, or to introduce others composed by private individuals.[130]
vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/ccdds/documents/rc_con_ccdds_doc_20040423_redemptionis-sacramentum_en.html


#10

Would Father happen to be an elder Dominican?

I for some reason have heard before that this phrasing was formally part of the Dominican rubrics for Mass… I believe it was on here in a thread, but it could have been another board… I’ll try and search for the post.
Infact, Father said it today during Mass so that’s why I was thinking of it.


#11

No he’s not a Dominican, he’s an archdiocesan priest. Not what I’d call elder either he’s maybe in his early 50’s.

That’s an interesting thought though. I’ll look into it as well.

Thanks.


#12

Not to sound like a pompous git but

I doubt that this version is ever approved. the Dominicans did have a different version of the Orate Fratres (there was no response) but it was not this one.


#13

Ah, I finally found where I heard it from… It wasn’t on Catholic Answers like I thought (my mind is going :stuck_out_tongue: ) however on EWTN in their Library on Liturgies…

Is it acceptable for the priest to say one prayer over the bread and wine, combining the two prayers?

A Dominican priest from Charlottesville, Virginia, has kindly pointed out that the celebrant who used the single prayer may have been a member of the Order of Preachers.

He writes: "In the Dominican Rite Low Mass the chalice was prepared before Mass and the oblation was made with a single prayer and single raising in both the Solemn and Low Masses. At Solemn High Mass the chalice was prepared during the Gradual.

"Both of these practices were also found in the liturgical family embracing the local uses of northern France and the Sarum Rite in England, from which family the Dominican Rite evolved.

“It is not uncommon for some Dominicans to use the old single oblation and to prepare the chalice ahead. The motive is nostalgia, not haste.”

The priest adds that, while he harbors much affection for the Dominican rite, he himself never follows this practice since it is contrary to the spirit and rubrics of the Roman rite.

I believe that his is a prudent decision when celebrating Mass for a congregation. Otherwise, the faithful may be confused by the difference in rites.

ewtn.com/library/Liturgy/ZLITUR44.HTM

As your Pastor isn’t a Dominican then I can’t really think of any reason why he would do this.


#14

Yes he can say it this way, according to the OCP Missalette that we use.

Jim


#15

I think but that is talking about the “Blessed are you” prayers? Something like

Blessed are you, Lord, God of all creation. Through your goodness we have this bread and wine to offer, which earth has given and the fruit of the vine, and work of human hands. It will become for us the bread of life and our spiritual drink

sounds a bit clumsy, I know, but you get the idea.


#16

In the missal I have in my hand, which has both latin and english, published by Scepter Publishers, the words are;

“Pray brethren(9), that our sacrifice may be acceptable to God,
the almighty Father.”

the footnote says ;

(9) at the discretion of the priest, other words which seem more suitable under the circumstances, such as "friends, dearly beloved, my brother and sisters, may be used.

The missalettes we use at my parish, published by OCP, says the same thing.

Jim


#17

I think but that is talking about the “Blessed are you” prayers? Something like

Blessed are you, Lord, God of all creation. Through your goodness we have this bread and wine to offer, which earth has given and the fruit of the vine, and work of human hands. It will become for us the bread of life and our spiritual drink

sounds a bit clumsy, I know, but you get the idea.

I would respectfully disagree. There is no warrant for him qualifying the word “sacrifice”. In a way, the addition obscures the sacrifice referred to is chiefly the Sacrifice that is going to be offered- “at [the priest’s] hands” - the Body and Blood of Christ


#18

He can substitute the words outlined in the missal, “brethren” for sisters and brothers or friends.

The OP’er doesn’t quite remember what words the priest actually used, so my point is that the missal does allow leeway, in the words I pointed out.

Jim


#19

I thought that was partially the topic of the OP


#20

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