Contraception for pets


#1

I went to the local pet store and they said that if I wanted a kitten, there was an additional charge for fixing (spay or neutering) the kitten. Is it a sin against nature to neuter a small kitten and prevent it from ever having a family as nature intended?


#2

NO it is a kind thing to do for them. We have had all of our dogs and our cat “fixed”. We didn’t intend for them to bring more puppies or kittens into this world so we did this. There are TOO MANY people breeding dogs & cat JUST for the money when tons of wonderful animals go without homes and are abandoned. SO SAD.

DON’T EVER get a dog or cat from a pet store. Most of those come from puppy & kitty mills and they are HORRIBLE. Go to the local animal shelter.


#3

Animals aren’t people. Just like it is okay to kill animals to eat, it is okay to spay and neuter them.


#4

No, we are supposed to take care of animlas. There is a real problem with overpopulation, abuse, and abandonment. Spaying and neutering is necessary to combat these problems.


#5

Nothing is written in this subject in the Bible or the cathechism…

So, it’s up to you and your conviction.

My husband and me, don’t really like the idea of pill for cats. It’s unatural, unheathy for them on long term, and a source of pollution of environment.

So one day, we stop to give it, and closed the female cat on its reproductive period.
But one day, someone, has not been vigilent.
After it wasn’t able to give birth to the kitten, we sterilized it, to prevent any recidivism, and to anticipate it aging.
But streilization is unhealthy too. Yes, it give it a better life expectancy, but also weight gain.


#6

LOL…i guess


#7

But can you licitly touch their hair?


#8

Isn’t it against nature to use contraception?

But there is a real problem with overpopulation for humans. That does not justify use of contraception? Or does it?


#9

Overpopulation is debatable. The standard for humans is different from the one we use on animals.


#10

Absolutely! For humans, and even animals.

It depends on where on the planet.

Some, say it is a myh, such as Population Institute Rechersh, because humans created their resources, and in many countries, the birth rate fall.

But humans, versus animals have a brain and a capacity to decide. They can abstain themselves. They can choose to have sex when they are in infertile periods. They can contracept, or streilized themselves.

And no, it is not justify contraception, because it is against human dignity, and there are others way to be “responsible” than using it. And any coercitive policy is immoral too!

But humans and animals don’t have the same dignity.

I said that, but i am against the pill for pets.


#11

Does natural law even apply to animals?

Humans have free will and can choose to reign-in sex and/or more thoughtfully consume resource. Animals don’t have free will and don’t do either (perhaps with some exceptions that don’t include the major pet categories).


#12

Why wouldn’t it? Since according to the Bible, animals are created to praise the Lord, wouldn’t it be wrong to prevent their ability to reproduce and praise the Lord?
It is going against nature and how God has made nature. When God made the animals, He gave them the power to reproduce naturally.


#13

You mean those same animals that eat the heads of their mates after mating (female black widow spiders and praying mantises), and engage in sexual activity between the same gender (bonobos)?


#14

I am talking about cats and dogs. They were created to be friends of man and their creation was an example of praise to the Lord. By denying them the right to reproduce are you not going against a particular intended natural purpose of their giving praise to the Lord? How can they give praise to the Lord if you prevent them from being born?
If the question is one of overpopulation and it is said that contraception of cats and dogs is permitted on the grounds that there is overpopulation, the green movement can apply that same reasoning to justify contraception for humans. In many places of the world today, there is a severe shortage of clean drinking water. Even in the USA, in southern California, there are already in place laws to ration the use of water. Water is being rationed in 140 Brazilian cities. Water is being rationed in Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Spain, south Africa and in Ireland. There is not enough water to go around in several parts of the world today. But as the world population increases, how much more severe will these water shortages become?


#15

Animals aren’t people. The same rules don’t apply and we’re allowed to manage their populations as we see fit. The only alternative to sterilization is euthanasia and I’m pretty sure you won’t like that either.

Canadian Geese are wretched. I deal with them regularly and I support all efforts to reduce their population.


#16

No, it is not a sin. There is an oversupply of cats and dogs in the world right now and many of them end up suffering and being killed because there aren’t enough homes. A cat or dog that isn’t spayed or neutered will also be very uncomfortable if it doesn’t get to mate and may develop behaviors that would make it difficult to keep in a home. Spaying or neutering your cat or dog is the kind, humane, Christian thing to do.

Animals do not marry and the Catechism does not require them to be open to procreation.


#17

Animals do not need to have litters of young in order to “give praise to the Lord”. They give praise just by existing, and we give praise to the Lord when we are good stewards of them and that includes taking humane steps to prevent animal overpopulation.

If they were just allowed to reproduce, we would end up having to kill off thousands of their young every year. We already kill off too many unwanted animals as it is. I have friends who work at animal shelters and “kitten season” is a miserable time because it’s so hard to find homes for all the kittens and cats who end up at shelters. Many shelters end up just killing a lot of them. The animals aren’t happy to be killed. Much kinder to just prevent new animals from being born.


#18

The city where I live requires all cats and dogs to be “fixed” or the owner pays a $500 license fee. My cats have all been fixed and they are not fat. Some people just drop pets off in areas where they will be killed by predators. That is definitely more painful way to die.


#19

Sterilization or euthanasia for animals is not immoral. It is a grave error to confuse animal life with the sanctity of human life.


#20

As far as I’m aware, that’s from Psalm 148, which also talks about mountains praising the Lord, so I think it is safe to say that praising the Lord isn’t the same for an animal as it is for a person. Natural law helps guide us, as moral agents, towards making right decisions. If we started applying it to animals, we’d get some really weird definitions of what is moral.

Which are still animals and still relevant to a discussion on whether or not animals are subject to natural law.

That depends on where you want to go with it. Both dogs and cats were originally created as wild animals.

At some point in history, humans and certain wolves realized that it was advantages to help each other, and over time humans exerted their dominion over dogs to breed them for specific purposes. As such, dogs and humans very much evolved together, and dogs over time became good companion animals for people.

Cats are a little more complicated, but a lot of it is similar. Ignoring cat worship, certain cats, particularly some African wildcats, and people realized that there was mutual benefit to having each other around. Over time, humans also began breeding cats, and the mutual benefit each gets from the other has kept cats a popular pet.

In neither of these cases was the animal originally created in what we would consider as friendly. Sure, to an extent, humans can still get along with wolves and African wildcats, but we would consider them wild and, at least in the case of wolves, probably not someone you try to go out and play with. (African wildcats, as far as I’m aware, aren’t dangerous.)

So in a way, the very fact that these are pets are a “violation” of how God originally created them. Most domestic dog and cat breeds came about because we, over hundreds to thousands of years, bred them for looks, behavior, jobs, etc. But again, God gave us dominion over them, and barring abuse of the system, domestication has worked out really well for both. There come times, though, that the best thing for them is to stop their breeding, because they, unlike us, have no capacity themselves to stop doing it just because it is bad for them.


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