Contraceptive Pill - but not for Contraception


#1

This is a question about people who have been prescribed the contraceptive pill (like me) but who do not take it as a contraceptive.

For years I suffered from really bad flu-like symptoms every few weeks, with chronic back pain, aching joints, becomming very tired and all sorts of little random annoyances, like sore eyes; suddenly low pain threshold etc.

It turns out, after much to-ing and fro-ing, that my body does not know how to respond to the hormone surges and basically sees itself as being ‘under attack’. In non-medical terms, my immune system is a bit clueless;):wink:

Anyway, as you can imagine, being like this on and off for over 10 years has meant that I have been very reluctant to enter into any kind of serious relationship with any man, because I have a very demanding job and coupled with being ill every few weeks, for the most part, I deliberately didn’t go seeking anyone out! (yes - I do have my close male friend who I love dearly, but I’ve accepted this can’t happen without a miracle - definitely not if Chevalier is on the Tribunal :stuck_out_tongue: ) (sorry - your comments were appreciated - just can’t resist a small dig:))

However, as a result of my experiences with my friend, I’ve done lots and lots of research on annulments and the validity of marriage and one thing that strikes me is that if I did get married - but deliberatley chose to keep taking the pill for my own health and sanity - and to enable me to function as a good and supportive wife - am I undermining one of the fundamentals of marriage? Or is it counted as the same as someone who believes they are barren but remains hopeful to the idea that God is all-powerful and could send them a child if He wished? To me the difference is that I would be deliberately sabotaging my chances of conception.


#2

The moral teaching of the Church is that one may use theraputic means to treat a disease even if it has unintended, but foreseen, side effects including sterility.

So, one may take hormone therapy (which is what you are doing), receive radiation, receive chemo, have surgeries, and take other types of medications even if the unintended side effect is sterility (temporary or permanent).

Certainly you should look at other solutions for your condition, but if the course of treatment your doctor has prescribed is controlling your condition you should follow your doctor’s advice.


#3

The church teaches and continues to uphold that the pill may be used for legitimate therautic reasons. This means you can continue to use it and get married. You are not seeking to contracept, you are seeking a medical treatment that also renders you sterile. This makes you come under the contexr of a sterile person. When you agree to welcome new life, this means that should you become pregnant while sterile, you are grateful and accepting of that. Or that you are open to having children in your marriage, even if that seems impossible :slight_smile:

Basically, don’t worry. You are fine. The church in all of her love, graciousness, and charity understands that some women have insurmountable health issues than can only be treated a certain way. Makes sense, since she was founded by Jesus himself! :thumbsup:


#4

Not sure where the other posts have come to the knowledge they are passing on to you.

Yes you may take a contraceptive pill ofr theraputic reasons under only two conditions...

  1. You are a single women.
  2. You are a married women who is abstaining from the marital embrace while taking the pill.

The Church is clear that you may not be married, open to life (as one states in their wedding vows) and contracept. There are much healthier ways to take care of the monthly struggles that women experience....Dr. Hilgers in Omaha is a great example. Besides the fact that being married, having a regular marital embrace and using contraception is immoral - it also is not the best choice for a women's health.

Seek out a Natrual Family Planning person - they have much more to offer you than a pill a day.

Please seek the truth in this matter...read Christopher West's book on Sex and Marriage. He also addresses your question.

Prayers for your situation.


#5

Since you ask, I will tell you where I got my information. The Pope John Paul VI and priests.

On the other hand, the Church does not consider at all illicit the use of those therapeutic means necessary to cure bodily diseases, even if a foreseeable impediment to procreation should result there from—provided such impediment is not directly intended for any motive whatsoever.

His language suggests that the pill is NOT a contraceptive when taken for legitimate therapeutic reasons, it is a MEDICATION that has the terrible side effect of sterilization.

Secondly, from CAF’s own apologist:

This is a very important matter that is widely misunderstood:

The Church considers a miscarriage to be a physical evil. Since abortion DELIBERATELY causes a miscarriage, it is therefore also a MORAL evil. The Church sees an UNintended miscarriage as only a physical evil since it is not deliberately caused by the couple.

The use of the pill for medical reasons may cause an UNintended miscarriage. Women often have unintended miscarriages—sometimes without even knowing it. It is only miscarriages that are INTENDED that the Church considers immoral. The Church never allows the pill to be used as an abortifacient. But it does allow the use of the pill for medical reasons with the possiblity of producing an unintended miscarriage—without obliging the couple to abstain from sexual relations during that time.

Fr. Vincent Serpa, O.P.

I am going to trust the Pope and priests on the moral nature of this matter and submit that there is no reason whatsoever to abstain from marriage or sex while taking any kind of medication or having recieved any medical treatment that renders one permanently or temporarily infertile. This is why infertile couples can marry, and why post-menopausal women may marry as well. Also, don’t forget that there are options as far as adoption too.


#6

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]
Not sure where the other posts have come to the knowledge they are passing on to you.

[/quote]

From the encyclical Humanae Vitae, written by Pope Paul VI.

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]

Yes you may take a contraceptive pill ofr theraputic reasons under only two conditions...

  1. You are a single women.
  2. You are a married women who is abstaining from the marital embrace while taking the pill.

[/quote]

This is not accurate. The Church does not require a person who takes medication that renders them sterile to abstain from sexual intercourse.

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]
The Church is clear that you may not be married, open to life (as one states in their wedding vows) and contracept.

[/quote]

A person who is taking a medication to treat a disease/condition that has an effect of making them steril, temporarily or permanently, is not contracepting

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]
There are much healthier ways to take care of the monthly struggles that women experience....Dr. Hilgers in Omaha is a great example.

[/quote]

Perhaps there is. Perhaps there isn't. We are not doctors. Certainly she can look for second opinions and other treatments, but she is not required to do so.

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]
Besides the fact that being married, having a regular marital embrace and using contraception is immoral - it also is not the best choice for a women's health.

[/quote]

A person who is taking a medication that makes them sterile is not contracepting.

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]
Seek out a Natrual Family Planning person - they have much more to offer you than a pill a day.

[/quote]

NFP cannot treat or cure an immune system illness.

[quote="jmjconder, post:4, topic:183729"]
Please seek the truth in this matter...

[/quote]

She has been given the truth. Humanae Vitae 15:

  1. On the other hand, the Church does not consider at all illicit the use of those therapeutic means necessary to cure bodily diseases, even if a foreseeable impediment to procreation should result there from—provided such impediment is not directly intended for any motive whatsoever.

#7

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