conversion of husband


#1

I asked earlier how a Catholic wife should go about helping God to convert a non-Catholic husband. I have read that some conversions came about through the simple acts of love and kindness shown by the Catholic spouse. Besides constant prayer what can one do? Sometimes my husband will accompany our children at Mass and he admits that gets something from the experience. I have recently come back sacramentally to the Church myself and have been learning about my long neglected Faith. Any advice would be appreciated.


#2

follow the Catholic teachings and moral life in Christ in every aspect of life, modelling what a good Catholic “looks like”. don’t badmouth the church and people in it. love and honor your husband. act as if the joy of the Mass is a reality for you.


#3

Speaking from my own experience, I’d say that putting all your energy into prayer on this issue is the way to go. The reason I say that is that years ago I had a very good friend who was quite anti-Catholic in his views, and called the Pope names and all sorts of bad things. When he would start ranting and raving, I just let him go on and didn’t say a word, as that was the best way to get him to stop. But every chance I got I prayed for God to show my friend the full light of truth that is the Catholic Church. We lost touch for a few years, and I never stopped praying for him. When we re-connected about five years later, my friend had already converted to Catholicism and is now very active in Church ministries! This shows you the power of prayer, and I really believe it is the most efficient way for you to see your husband’s conversion. It may feel like you aren’t doing enough, but in reality you are doing everything humanly possible. I’m sure God will answer your prayer.


#4

I agree with the other two posts. I would also suggest you practice the virtue of patience. It will happen on God’s schedule not yours. I waited over 15 years. I know a family where the wife didn’t convert until after 35 years of marriage. I also found it helpful to involve our lives in our parish as much as possible. For instance, we did Habitat for Humanity with our parish. This put my husband in an activity were he came in contact with other Catholic men. He became friends with some of these Catholic men and they invited him to other Catholic activities. When our son started school we were required to volunteer, so this meant more activities for him at our parish. But I also knew what his limits were and didn’t push. For him this would have been a turn off. On the day to day, I really tried to be an example of Christian living.


#5

[quote=want to know]I asked earlier how a Catholic wife should go about helping God to convert a non-Catholic husband. I have read that some conversions came about through the simple acts of love and kindness shown by the Catholic spouse. Besides constant prayer what can one do? Sometimes my husband will accompany our children at Mass and he admits that gets something from the experience. I have recently come back sacramentally to the Church myself and have been learning about my long neglected Faith. Any advice would be appreciated.
[/quote]

I was a non-practicing Catholic for many years…like the other posters said…pray (EVERY day) for your husband…entrust him to Christ and petition St. Joseph. In addition to the good advice you are getting here…if you have a good RCIA program…make a commitment to go yourself…learn about your faith and be excited about it…it already sounds like he’s somewhat supportive with the kids…invite him to join you at RCIA with no expectation of a commitment.

I asked my spouse to be supportive of me as I came back to the Church through RCIA…next thing I knew we were both going. It was never threatening…and we ended up finding our way home…together.

We’ll pray good things will happen and he’ll find his way home!

Don’t get discouraged! May God bless your family!


closed #6

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