Conversion


#1

If someone was baptized methodist, wanted to convert to Catholicism and had a past abortion is this possible ?


#2

Yes, very much so. The person would be able to convert :).


#3

Yes, 100%. No sin keeps us from the Church-- it is sinners for whom the church exists after all! That would be all of us!


#4

The Church recognizes one baptism and God can forgive any sin.


#5

[quote=1ke]Yes, 100%. No sin keeps us from the Church-- it is sinners for whom the church exists after all! That would be all of us!
[/quote]

Your statement is wrong.

There is a sin that keeps a convert away from the Church.

If one is divorced and remarried, if the Church does not find a way for an anullement than that convert cannot be a member of the Catholic Church.

My grandmother today would be Catholic, but the Church said no, because she was married to a Jew, then married to my grandfather whom was previosly married, becuase his marriage was done in a protestant church it was a valid marriage.

I struggle with this one.

On any other sins we can repent but when it comes to being married to a divorced man or woman this sin cannot be repented until their death.

Because my grandfather is now dead she could join the Catholic Church but why would she, she was not accepted years ago and is very happy in her Lutheran Church.


#6

[quote=John Paul III]On any other sins we can repent but when it comes to being married to a divorced man or woman this sin cannot be repented until their death.
[/quote]

This is very difficult. Repentance means giving up the sin. But can one give up one’s current spouse in order to join the Church? The alternative would be to refrain from marital relations.

I have an aunt who was married briefly in her youth, then abandoned by the husband. Apparently her request for an annulment was denied. She later married a very good man, and continued to go to Mass for years, but without receiving communion because objectively, her marriage was not recognized.

I urged her once to seek annulment again, since the revised rules had more flexibility built-in, but she would not go back for a second try. When her husband became old enough that impotence set in, she was able to go to confession and begin receiving communion again.

But to return to the OP’s question, a prior abortion would not prevent her entry into the Church.

For that matter, even a prior marriage would not prevent entry, if the previous marriage(s) were found to be null.


#7

Couldn’t they just live like celibate or they would be able to receive communion? I know a lady who is remarried in the Catholic Church who has not received an annulment and she attends Mass regularly, she just doesn’t receive communion.

God bless
Scylla


#8

[quote=John Paul III]Your statement is wrong.

There is a sin that keeps a convert away from the Church.

If one is divorced and remarried, if the Church does not find a way for an anullement than that convert cannot be a member of the Catholic Church.

My grandmother today would be Catholic, but the Church said no, because she was married to a Jew, then married to my grandfather whom was previosly married, becuase his marriage was done in a protestant church it was a valid marriage.

I struggle with this one.

On any other sins we can repent but when it comes to being married to a divorced man or woman this sin cannot be repented until their death.

Because my grandfather is now dead she could join the Catholic Church but why would she, she was not accepted years ago and is very happy in her Lutheran Church.
[/quote]

What is the reason for this? I must admit that’s hard to accept, since we believe the Church is that which Christ and the apostles founded, I would think Jesus would want everyone on earth to be a member in it, no matter their past sins as long as they’re repentant.


#9

Also, why would she be able to become Catholic once your grandfather had died?


#10

[quote=John Paul III]Your statement is wrong.

There is a sin that keeps a convert away from the Church.

If one is divorced and remarried, if the Church does not find a way for an anullement than that convert cannot be a member of the Catholic Church…
[/quote]

the only sin that can keep one out of the Catholic Church is one that is not confessed, not repented of, and given up. If a person is living with someone to whom they are not validly married, and if they are continuing marital relations, that is a sin, because they are not married. If they persist in the sin, do not repent, and do not remedy the sinful condition, no they cannot enter the Church.

This would be true of an “chronic” sin.

without going into the particulars of any individual situation, the teaching is the same for everyone. Remarried divorced Catholics are not discriminated against. We are all asked to take up our cross daily, to conform to the commandments, beatitudes, and laws of the Church, including those respecting marriage and family life. The rules don’t change just because I had a rough time in my first marriage, and found a new love interest.

it is useless to speculate about an individual case. we do not know all the details of the situation or of previous marriages of the partners, and why or why not their previous marriages were judged valid. All the family knows is what the parties reported to them, they are not privy to everything looked at in the tribunal investigation. If the individual chooses to cling to the sin of living with a man to whom she is not married, yes that will keep her from the Church. We cannot pick and choose which teachings to accept and which to reject.


#11

divorce is not necessarily a sin, and even if it were, can be forgiven. Even remarriage after divorce is not necessarily a sin, each case is unique, bystanders cannot judge, that is why the Church has a process in place to make a judgement.

anyone in such a situation, or with a family member in such a situation, is strenuously urged to approach their parish priest for a referral to the tribunal at the earliest opportunity. So many times people are acting on what they have heard from unreliable sources, not on an actual judgement by the Church.


#12

[quote=CollegeKid]What is the reason for this? I must admit that’s hard to accept, since we believe the Church is that which Christ and the apostles founded, I would think Jesus would want everyone on earth to be a member in it, no matter their past sins as long as they’re repentant.
[/quote]

The problem isn’t past sin but current sin. If a man and a woman were married illicitly in the eyes of the Church they would be considered to be living in sin even if they are married by the state. They are living in an ongoing state of mortal (grave) sin. If they repent of it and do not live as husband and wife then they can once again receive the sacraments of the Church. But, anyone, no matter what state of sin they are in can attend Mass. It is hoped they will repent of their sin(s) and want to be reunited to the Church as faithful members who are no longer flaunting God’s law.

Also, why would she be able to become Catholic once your grandfather had died?

Because any marriage, licit or not, ends at death.


#13

[quote=CollegeKid]Also, why would she be able to become Catholic once your grandfather had died?
[/quote]

Until death does us apart.

At the time of his death she is no longer married.

Therefore capable of repenting her sin.

But its too late, the Church turned her away many years ago, so there is not any reason why she would join today, the Church said no, the Lutheran Church said yes, and therefore she is Lutheran.

In our past there was a period when the Church turned away all sinners, and then came a new Pope that said we are not a house of Saints but a house of Sinners.


#14

[quote=John Paul III]Until death does us apart.

At the time of his death she is no longer married.

Therefore capable of repenting her sin.

But its too late, the Church turned her away many years ago, so there is not any reason why she would join today, the Church said no, the Lutheran Church said yes, and therefore she is Lutheran.

In our past there was a period when the Church turned away all sinners, and then came a new Pope that said we are not a house of Saints but a house of Sinners.
[/quote]

Here’s my real question, as plainly as I can put it:

Will the Church ever turn away someone who, though they divorced their first spouse and remarried, is currently living celibately/separately/not as husband or wife to the other spouse plus doing whatever else is needed to be received into the Church? Would there ever be an instance where the Church just says something to the effect of: “Sorry, even though you’re not living in a state of sin with your current spouse and you’re fulfilling all of our requirements, we can’t give you an annulment and you can’t be a member of the Church.”?


#15

[quote=puzzleannie]anyone in such a situation, or with a family member in such a situation, is strenuously urged to approach their parish priest for a referral to the tribunal at the earliest opportunity. So many times people are acting on what they have heard from unreliable sources, not on an actual judgement by the Church.
[/quote]

I can’t disagree with that. The marriage tribunal is the place to resolve individual marriage questions.


#16

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