Converting Over to been A Catholic


#1

Ok after searching for A Good Religion that I can get A Fullness Of Jesus Christ I've Choose Converting to Catholic .

I'm Moving to soon so I'm Waiting to Officially Join A Parish in CA & Join their RICA & Officially Convert Over .

But I've Bought & have been reading the Following Books to Help me On my Journey into the Catholic Church .

A Catholic Holy Bible
Catholicism For Dummies
The Cathechism Of the Catholic Church
The Cathechism Explained ( From the EWTN Website )

I've Heard the The "Cathechism Of The Catholic Church" CCC Is what Most Catholics Study By & Read as A Form of The Catholic Church Doctrine's Is this True ? .

But I'm loving reading all the Books I've Bought .


#2

The Catholicism For Dummies Should be A Must for all Converting to Catholicism & is wanting to know more about The Church & Religion , each time I Read this Book I learn something new each Day .


#3

The Cathechism Explained I Bought on the EWTN Website , Its Basically A Book explaining more about Cathechism & Cathechism Of the Catholic Church its A Really good Book , But I had No idea how Thick it is "The Cathechism Explained" Is Thicker then My Bible .......LOL I was thinking it would be Like A Book thats not Thick but In the Middle ........LOL Noooooo the Thing is Thicker then your average Bible .........LOL Like Good Lord ...........LOL

Its A Hardcover ( Blue ) with Gold Lettering Very Nice , Just so Dang Thick ..........LOL I'm like Will I ever get done reading it .........LOL

I Received the book in the mail & Thought to myself My Lord Jesus This Book is Thick & Big ........LOL .


#4

First of all - WELCOME HOME
:dancing::extrahappy::dancing:

The Catechism is THE book of Catholic teaching officially promulgated by the Church in Rome and, as it says itself is a "Sure norm for teaching..."

I agree that it seems funny that there should be so many thick books out there...I chalk it up to (what I call) the "Yea but what if..." principle.

The "yea but what if" principle refers to the tendency of humans to complicate simple lessons by asking "yea but what if..."...:D
It's sort of like in the Bible where Jesus says to forgive and somebody asks - "how many times"...:shrug:
After nearly 2000 years of "what if's" it's no wonder we have volumes of explanations....

Peace
James


#5

Heavens! Yes the mentioned books are good books. Thyese are outlines. If you need formal theology read Scott Hahn! However! Read the Saints for a real taste of the religion! Read St. Faustina! St. Francis. Read of Mary! Read of Fatima. Read what the Saints say of the Eucharist! :love:


#6

Read the Summa contra Gentiles and the Summa Theologiae so you know that your faith is rational, and not blind: that it is superior to all other faiths, and this is demonstrated through rigorous logic and good exegesis. And the Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis. And Christ Is Passing By by St Josemaria Escriva. And Fides et Ratio and Evangelium Vitae, and anything by Blessed Pope John Paul the Great or by the Holy Father. Both are copious authors compared to any other Pope in the modern era that I know of; John Paul the Great focuses more on theological, philosophical, and contemporary matters; the Holy Father focuses on exegesis and interpretation of the Bible.

I'm crazy about reading vast, vast amounts of writing, and, as a Catholic, that's included a sizable proportion of Catholic writing, so I tend to ramble on. However, for learning the basics of Catholicism, nothing beats a Catechism, whether it be the modern one, the Roman one, or the Baltimore one. I'm partial to the Roman catechism myself, but I believe the modern Catechism (the one in a rectangular white hardcover with gold on the corners) is the standard. And a good Catholic Bible, but I don't want to get in to that here - my passion for excellent Biblical translation is intense.

Scott Hahn is "formal theology"? I would have considered Balthasar "formal theology", and Scott Hahn "popular apologetics"?

Note: St Thomas Aquinas and Hans Urs von Balthasar are incredibly erudite, dense, and difficult to read if you don't already have a strong basis in classical philosophy and basic concepts of Catholic theology.

:signofcross:Welcome to the true Church of Jesus Christ, the true faith:signofcross:

We believe in one God,
the Father almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all things visible and invisible.

We believe in one Lord Jesus Christ,
the Only Begotten Son of God,
born of the Father before all ages.
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made, consubstantial with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation
he came down from heaven,
and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.

For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate,
he suffered death and was buried,
and rose again on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures.
He ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead
and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son is adored and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.

We believe in one, holy, Catholic and apostolic Church.
We confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins
and we look forward to the resurrection of the dead
and the life of the world to come.

Ave Maria,
Gratia plena,
Dominus tecum.

Benedictus tu in mulieribus
Et benedictus fructus ventris tui,
Iesus.

Sancta Maria,
Mater Dei,
Ora pro nobis peccatoribus
Nunc et in hora mortis nostrae.
**
Amen.**

Or as they say in Battlestar Galactica, "So say we all!"


#7

[quote="Khalid, post:6, topic:267660"]
Read the Summa contra Gentiles and the Summa Theologiae so you know that your faith is rational, and not blind: that it is superior to all other faiths, and this is demonstrated through rigorous logic and good exegesis. And the Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis. And Christ Is Passing By by St Josemaria Escriva. And Fides et Ratio and Evangelium Vitae, and anything by Blessed Pope John Paul the Great or by the Holy Father. Both are copious authors compared to any other Pope in the modern era that I know of; John Paul the Great focuses more on theological, philosophical, and contemporary matters; the Holy Father focuses on exegesis and interpretation of the Bible.

I'm crazy about reading vast, vast amounts of writing, and, as a Catholic, that's included a sizable proportion of Catholic writing, so I tend to ramble on. However, for learning the basics of Catholicism, nothing beats a Catechism, whether it be the modern one, the Roman one, or the Baltimore one. I'm partial to the Roman catechism myself, but I believe the modern Catechism (the one in a rectangular white hardcover with gold on the corners) is the standard. And a good Catholic Bible, but I don't want to get in to that here - my passion for excellent Biblical translation is intense.

Scott Hahn is "formal theology"? I would have considered Balthasar "formal theology", and Scott Hahn "popular apologetics"?

Note: St Thomas Aquinas and Hans Urs von Balthasar are incredibly erudite, dense, and difficult to read if you don't already have a strong basis in classical philosophy and basic concepts of Catholic theology.

:signofcross:Welcome to the true Church of Jesus Christ, the true faith:signofcross:

We believe in one God,
the Father almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all things visible and invisible.

We believe in one Lord Jesus Christ,
the Only Begotten Son of God,
born of the Father before all ages.
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made, consubstantial with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation
he came down from heaven,
and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.

For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate,
he suffered death and was buried,
and rose again on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures.
He ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead
and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son is adored and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.

We believe in one, holy, Catholic and apostolic Church.
We confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins
and we look forward to the resurrection of the dead
and the life of the world to come.

Ave Maria,
Gratia plena,
Dominus tecum.

Benedictus tu in mulieribus
Et benedictus fructus ventris tui,
Iesus.

Sancta Maria,
Mater Dei,
Ora pro nobis peccatoribus
Nunc et in hora mortis nostrae.
**
Amen.**

Or as they say in Battlestar Galactica, "So say we all!"

[/quote]

**
Catechism (the one in a rectangular white hardcover with gold on the corners) is the standard**

I Have this Standard Hardcover .............LOL & Love it .....LOL along with The "Cathecism Explained


#8

Hi Kanzaz!

I’m Also going to be a new Convert!
Congats and welcome!

I Wish you all the Best

God Bless :thumbsup:

Jamie


#9

[quote="kanzaz, post:3, topic:267660"]
The Cathechism Explained I Bought on the EWTN Website , Its Basically A Book explaining more about Cathechism & Cathechism Of the Catholic Church its A Really good Book , But I had No idea how Thick it is .

[/quote]

Hello Kanzaz! It's great to be HOME!

If you on the net, you may want to take a look at Catechism Class.

Merry Christmas :)

Anna


#10

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