Converts and What Holds Them Back


#61

And it can be a bit harder if I’m being honest


#62

Well if you have a chance to speak to your grandmother about this, I’d strongly recommend it. As much as possible, you should become a Catholic with your “eyes wide open”. It is important to know why your family left…sometimes the reason can be abuse. It is very important even to understand this.


#63

Sadly I’m unable to do that. She passed away. Been gone now for almost 5 years. I actually wear a cross with her name on the back


#64

I don’t think I’ll ever know exactly why she left the Church, that’s something I’ll only be able to speculate on


#65

I guess if it were me, I’d really dig on this one. Perhaps ask cousins, aunts, uncles, brothers, and sisters. I’ve found that issues related to family are cyclical. They happen generation after generation, even when the generations don’t talk about them…I don’t know your situation though…it may just be really difficult to understand why your grandmother left the church.


#66

Opinions on Mary, the Eucharist, and what kind of Bible is being used.


#67

Misunderstandings of what the Church actually teaches.


#68

Not believing in original sin.


#69

Our RCIA wasn’t like that. We didn’t “re-read the readings” and wait for a word to pop out.

Each week, we had a speaker, usually a priest, present a lecture and question-answer time on various doctrines and teachings of the Church. I especially remember the lecture on The Four Last Things, which was something new to me as a Protestant.

The person who was in charge of our RCIA also taught us about the Mass and what each part of the Mass meant and how we should respond. We learned about the Church calendar and the liturgical year and many different feast days and saints and traditions.

And finally, we had several great presentations on apologetics.

I’m sorry your RCIA is so dull.


#70

The Church has been around for a long time. For newcomers there is a lot to learn and to understand. For me it has been a lifetime of learning.
I love the Church. I cannot imagine not being a Catholic.
Welcome to you! :pray::pray::pray:


#71

I certainly feel very welome as a Catholic


#72

You seem to have had an exceptionally fruitful and interesting RCIA.


#73

Yes, we were very blessed. I’m not sure if it’s still this good or not, but I’ve heard no complaints.


#74

There aren’t doctrines that hold me back but, looking at everything right now, going through RCIA before I can be confirmed is an issue. Going would never be the problem. If my schedule permitted, I would go in a heartbeat starting this fall. I work nights though and it seems that RCIA classes always meet up one day of the week at nights.

Hopefully, as I go to Mass this morning, I will be able to speak with a priest or somebody else and talk about it. I’m sure there are some alternative ways to learn about the faith.

All my reservations about beliefs have disappeared. I used to have many questions but those have been extinguished over time due to looking for the answers. I don’t know what pulled me away from the faith in the past but I’m not going anywhere now. I used to be a protestant of quite a few different sects throughout the years. Always looking for the complete Truth. Thank God, I found it.


#75

If I were you I’d speak to your parish RCIA director. I’m sure if you explained the situation with your job they’d be willing to work with you on it. I talked to mine and told him that I couldn’t meet at regular week day times to discuss starting, and he shot me an email ASAP and we scheduled a meeting on the weekend.

Just a matter of letting them know I think


#76

inserts mic drop


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