Convincing Calvinists


#21

To make this subject more complicated.

ANother friend of mine has now joined the debate somewhat. He says he is somewhere between Calvinism, Arminianism, and Molinism.

Anyone know if the Wiki pages on these subjects are accurate for a primer?

The wiki page on Molinism appears to claim that it is compatible with Catholicism? Can anyone confirm that? I am eating lunch with this person tomorrow to discuss this very thing. Would like to be more prepared than I am at the moment.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molinism


#22

Catholic Encyclopedia:
[LIST]
*]Moninism
newadvent.org/cathen/10437a.htm
*]Congruism
newadvent.org/cathen/04251b.htm
*]Controversies on Grace
newadvent.org/cathen/06710a.htm
*]Dogmatic Theology - See Creation (de Deo creante)
newadvent.org/cathen/14580a.htm
[/LIST]


#23

Seems like one confused guy you have there.

Don’t know much about Molinism if any. Too much reading for me, if someone can maybe explain whats the difference between Molinism and Armenianism as they seem quite close as I skimmed over it?


#24

Hi!
…here’s a little take on the Catechism of the Catholic Church on Grace:

2002 God’s free initiative demands man’s free response, for God has created man in his image by conferring on him, along with freedom, the power to know him and love him. The soul only enters freely into the communion of love. God immediately touches and directly moves the heart of man. He has placed in man a longing for truth and goodness that only he can satisfy. The promises of “eternal life” respond, beyond all hope, to this desire. (vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p3s1c3a2.htm)

…so as far as man having the ability to reject God’s Gift of Grace, there is an agreement–here’s newadvent.org on the issue:

For they admitted only a conditioned predestination to glory which becomes absolute only consequent upon the foreseen merits of man (prœdestinatio post — et propter — prœvisa merita), and roundly condemned negative reprobation on the ground that it not only limited but even ran counter to the salvific will of God. (newadvent.org/cathen/10437a.htm)

Maran atha!

Angel


#25

Molina and Arminius have a different conception of middle knowledge. Just to mention two:

Arminius believed that God decreed salvation without middle knowledge so an individual that receives Christ, obligates God to his salvation.

Molina thought that Arminius belief denied God’s sovereignty because God was obligated to incarnate.


#26

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